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Microbiota depression

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29031410/harnessing-gut-microbes-for-mental-health-getting-from-here-to-there
#1
REVIEW
Annadora J Bruce-Keller, J Michael Salbaum, Hans-Rudolf Berthoud
There has been an explosion of interest in the study of microorganisms inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract (gut microbiota) and their impact on host health and physiology. Accumulating data suggest that altered communication between gut microbiota and host systems could participate in disorders such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and autoimmune disorders as well as neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism, anxiety, and major depressive disorders. The conceptual development of the microbiome-gut-brain axis has facilitated understanding of the complex and bidirectional networks between gastrointestinal microbiota and their host, highlighting potential mechanisms through which this environment influences central nervous system physiology...
August 30, 2017: Biological Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29024170/steroids-stress-and-the-gut-microbiome-brain-axis
#2
REVIEW
Marc J Tetel, Geert J de Vries, Roberto C Melcangi, GianCarlo Panzica, Siobhain M O'Mahony
It is becoming well established that the gut microbiome has a profound impact on human health and disease. In this review, we explore how steroids can influence the gut microbiota, and in turn how the gut microbiota can influence hormone levels. Within the context of the gut microbiome-brain axis, we discuss how perturbations in the gut microbiota can alter the stress axis and behavior. In addition, human studies on the possible role of gut microbiota in depression and anxiety are examined. Finally, we present some of the challenges and important questions that need to be addressed by future research in this exciting new area at the intersection of steroids, stress, gut-brain axis and human health...
October 12, 2017: Journal of Neuroendocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29016169/the-microbiome-as-a-novel-paradigm-in-studying-stress-and-mental-health
#3
Richard T Liu
At the intersection between neuroscience, microbiology, and psychiatry, the enteric microbiome has potential to become a novel paradigm for studying the psychobiological underpinnings of mental illness. Several studies provide support for the view that the enteric microbiome influences behavior through the microbiota-gut-brain axis. Moreover, recent findings are suggestive of the possibility that dysregulation of the enteric microbiota (i.e., dysbiosis) and associated bacterial translocation across the intestinal epithelium may be involved in the pathophysiology of stress-related psychiatric disorders, particularly depression...
October 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28992428/inflammatory-mediators-in-mood-disorders-therapeutic-opportunities
#4
Madeline L Pfau, Caroline Ménard, Scott J Russo
Mood disorders such as depression are among the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in the United States, but they are inadequately treated in a substantial proportion of patients. Accordingly, neuropsychiatric research has pivoted from investigation of monoaminergic mechanisms to exploration of novel mediators, including the role of inflammatory processes. Subsets of mood disorder patients exhibit immune-related abnormalities, including elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines, monocytes, and neutrophils in the peripheral circulation; dysregulation of neuroglia and blood-brain barrier function; and disruption of gut microbiota...
October 6, 2017: Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28968660/innate-immune-response-and-outcome-of-clostridium-difficile-infection-are-dependent-on-fecal-bacterial-composition-in-the-aged-host
#5
Jae Hyun Shin, Yingnan Gao, John H Moore, David T Bolick, Glynis L Kolling, Martin Wu, Cirle A Warren
Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a serious threat for an aging population. Using an aged mouse model, we evaluated the effect of age and the roles of innate immunity and intestinal microbiota.Aged (18 months) and young (8 weeks) mice were infected with C. difficile and disease severity, immune response, and intestinal microbiome were compared. The same experiment was repeated with intestinal microbiota exchange between aged and young mice before infection. Higher mortality was observed in aged mice with weaker neutrophilic mobilization in blood and intestinal tissue and depressed pro-inflammatory cytokines in early infection...
August 22, 2017: Journal of Infectious Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28964773/effects-of-gut-microbiota-disturbance-induced-in-early-life-on-the-expression-of-extrasynaptic-gaba-a-receptor-%C3%AE-5-and-%C3%AE-subunits-in-the-hippocampus-of-adult-rats
#6
Liang Liang, Heng Zhou, Shiying Zhang, Jingping Yuan, Hao Wu
Previous studies have demonstrated that gut microbiota disturbance significantly increases the risk of emotional disorders via the gut-brain axis, but the mechanism is unclear. Furthermore, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) deficits were reported to be implicated in the development of depression and amnesia, but the alterations in the GABA-A receptor subunits that are involved in the pathogenetic process have not been fully elucidated. This study used juvenile rats that were fed ampicillin-Na to establish degree III dysbiosis of the intestinal flora and examined emotional change via the tail suspension test, forced swim test and Morris water maze...
September 28, 2017: Brain Research Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28943841/microglia-an-interface-between-the-loss-of-neuroplasticity-and-depression
#7
REVIEW
Gaurav Singhal, Bernhard T Baune
Depression has been widely accepted as a major psychiatric disease affecting nearly 350 million people worldwide. Research focus is now shifting from studying the extrinsic and social factors of depression to the underlying molecular causes. Microglial activity is shown to be associated with pathological conditions, such as psychological stress, pathological aging, and chronic infections. These are primary immune effector cells in the CNS and regulate the extensive dialogue between the nervous and the immune systems in response to different immunological, physiological, and psychological stressors...
2017: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28925886/the-microbiota-gut-brain-axis-in-neuropsychiatric-disorders-pathophysiological-mechanisms-and-novel-treatments
#8
Yong-Ku Kim, Cheolmin Shin
BACKGROUND: The human gut microbiome comprise a huge number of microorganisms with co-evolutionary associations with humans. It has been repeatedly revealed that bidirectional communication exists between the brain and the gut and involves neural, hormonal, and immunological pathways. Evidences from neuroscience researches over the past few years suggest that microbiota is essential for the development and maturation of brain systems that are associated to stress responses. METHOD: This review provides that the summarization of the communication among microbiota, gut and brain and the results of preclinical and clinical studies on gut microbiota used in treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders...
September 15, 2017: Current Neuropharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28901279/role-of-physical-exercise-and-omega-3-fatty-acids-on-depressive-illness-in-the-elderly
#9
Stefano Farioli-Vecchioli, Stefano Sacchetti, Vittoria Nicolis di Robilant, Debora Cutuli
BACKGROUND: In adulthood, depression is the most common type of mental illness and will be the second leading cause of disease by 2020. Major depression dramatically affects the function of the central nervous system and degrades life quality, especially during aging. Several mechanisms underlie the pathophysiology of depressive illness, given it has a multifactorial etiology. Human and animal studies have demonstrated that depression is mainly associated with imbalances in neurotransmitters and neurotrophins, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis alterations, brain volume changes, neurogenesis dysfunction, and dysregulation of inflammatory pathways...
September 11, 2017: Current Neuropharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28890155/antibiotic-induced-microbiota-perturbation-causes-gut-endocannabinoidome-changes-hippocampal-neuroglial-reorganization-and-depression-in-mice
#10
F Guida, F Turco, M Iannotta, D De Gregorio, I Palumbo, G Sarnelli, A Furiano, F Napolitano, S Boccella, L Luongo, M Mazzitelli, A Usiello, F De Filippis, F A Iannotti, F Piscitelli, D Ercolini, V de Novellis, V Di Marzo, R Cuomo, S Maione
The microbiota-gut-brain axis (MGBA) regulates the reciprocal interaction between chronic inflammatory bowel and psychiatric disorders. This interaction involves multiple pathways that are highly debated. We examined the behavioural, biochemical and electrophysiological alterations, as well as gut microbiota composition in a model of antibiotic-induced experimental dysbiosis. Inflammation of the small intestine was also assessed. Mice were exposed to a mixture of antimicrobials for 2weeks. Afterwards, they received Lactobacillus casei DG (LCDG) or a vehicle for up to 7days via oral gavage...
September 7, 2017: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28888668/effects-of-obesity-on-depression-a-role-for-inflammation-and-the-gut-microbiota
#11
REVIEW
Julieta Schachter, Jan Martel, Chuan-Sheng Lin, Chih-Jung Chang, Tsung-Ru Wu, Chia-Chen Lu, Yun-Fei Ko, Hsin-Chih Lai, David M Ojcius, John D Young
Depression is a mental disorder associated with environmental, genetic and psychological factors. Recent studies indicate that chronic neuro-inflammation may affect brain physiology and alter mood and behavior. Consumption of a high-fat diet leads to obesity and chronic systemic inflammation. The gut microbiota mediates many effects of a high-fat diet on human physiology and may also influence the mood and behavior of the host. We review here recent studies suggesting the existence of a link between obesity, the gut microbiota and depression, focusing on the mechanisms underlying the effects of a high-fat diet on chronic inflammation and brain physiology...
September 6, 2017: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28887729/intestinal-microbiome-gut-brain-axis-and-irritable-bowel-syndrome
#12
REVIEW
Gabriele Moser, Camille Fournier, Johannes Peter
Psychological comorbidity is highly present in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Recent research points to a role of intestinal microbiota in visceral hypersensitivity, anxiety, and depression. Increased disease reactivity to psychological stress has been described too. A few clinical studies have attempted to identify features of dysbiosis in IBS. While animal studies revealed strong associations between stress and gut microbiota, studies in humans are rare. This review covers the most important studies on intestinal microbial correlates of psychological and clinical features in IBS, including stress, anxiety, and depression...
September 8, 2017: Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28883460/gender-based-differences-in-host-behavior-and-gut-microbiota-composition-in-response-to-high-fat-diet-and-stress-in-a-mouse-model
#13
Laura C Bridgewater, Chenhong Zhang, Yanqiu Wu, Weiwei Hu, Qianpeng Zhang, Jing Wang, Shengtian Li, Liping Zhao
Obesity is associated with a high prevalence of mood disorders such as anxiety and depression. Both stress and high fat diet can alter the gut microbiota and contribute to obesity. To examine the interrelationships between obesity, stress, gut microbiota and mood disorders, obesity was induced in mice using a high fat diet, and the mice were subsequently stressed using a chronic unpredictable mild stress protocol. During the experiment, the composition of the gut microbiota was analyzed by 16 S rRNA gene high-throughput sequencing, and anxiety-like behaviors were measured...
September 7, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28878696/-i-am-i-and-my-bacterial-circumstances-linking-gut-microbiome-neurodevelopment-and-depression
#14
REVIEW
Juan M Lima-Ojeda, Rainer Rupprecht, Thomas C Baghai
Recently, there has been renewed interest in the role played by microbiome in both human health and human disease. A correct equilibrium between the human host and their microorganisms is important for an appropriate physiological function. Extensive research has shown that microbes that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract-or gut microbiota-are involved not only in both nutritive and digestive activities but also in immunological processes. Moreover, the gut microbiome influences both central nervous system and energy homeostasis...
2017: Frontiers in Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28852308/influence-of-gut-microbiota-on-neuropsychiatric-disorders
#15
REVIEW
María Carmen Cenit, Yolanda Sanz, Pilar Codoñer-Franch
The last decade has witnessed a growing appreciation of the fundamental role played by an early assembly of a diverse and balanced gut microbiota and its subsequent maintenance for future health of the host. Gut microbiota is currently viewed as a key regulator of a fluent bidirectional dialogue between the gut and the brain (gut-brain axis). A number of preclinical studies have suggested that the microbiota and its genome (microbiome) may play a key role in neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders...
August 14, 2017: World Journal of Gastroenterology: WJG
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28843452/the-microbiome-as-a-key-regulator-of-brain-behavior-and-immunity-commentary-on-the-2017-named-series
#16
Michael T Bailey, John F Cryan
The focus on the microbiome for the 2017 Named Series in Brain, Behavior, and Immunity reflects the rapidly growing interest in commensal microbes and the effects that they can have on physiological processes often studied in PsychoNeuroImmunology Research. The studies included in this Named Series show that commensal microbes can impact immune system activity, as well as brain and behavioral processes across the lifespan, and are involved in behavioral and immunological responses to social stresses. The studies also show that dietary effects on brain, behavior, and immunity often involve alterations of the gut microbiota...
August 23, 2017: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28816544/animal-inflammation-based-models-of-depression-and-their-application-to-drug-discovery
#17
REVIEW
Li Ma, Konstantin A Demin, Tatyana O Kolesnikova, Sergey L Kharsko, Xiaokang Zhu, Xiaodong Yuan, Cai Song, Darya A Meshalkina, Brian E Leonard, Li Tian, Allan V Kalueff
Depression, anxiety and other affective disorders are globally widespread and severely debilitating human brain diseases. Despite their high prevalence and mental health impact, affective pathogenesis is poorly understood, and often remains recurrent and resistant to treatment. The lack of efficient antidepressants and presently limited conceptual innovation necessitate novel approaches and new drug targets in the field of antidepressant therapy. Areas covered: Herein, the authors discuss the emerging role of neuro-immune interactions in affective pathogenesis, which can become useful targets for CNS drug discovery, including modulating neuroinflammatory pathways to alleviate affective pathogenesis...
October 2017: Expert Opinion on Drug Discovery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28804508/a-psychology-of-the-human-brain-gut-microbiome-axis
#18
Andrew P Allen, Timothy G Dinan, Gerard Clarke, John F Cryan
In recent years, we have seen increasing research within neuroscience and biopsychology on the interactions between the brain, the gastrointestinal tract, the bacteria within the gastrointestinal tract, and the bidirectional relationship between these systems: the brain-gut-microbiome axis. Although research has demonstrated that the gut microbiota can impact upon cognition and a variety of stress-related behaviours, including those relevant to anxiety and depression, we still do not know how this occurs. A deeper understanding of how psychological development as well as social and cultural factors impact upon the brain-gut-microbiome axis will contextualise the role of the axis in humans and inform psychological interventions that improve health within the brain-gut-microbiome axis...
April 2017: Social and Personality Psychology Compass
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28795307/sex-symptom-severity-and-quality-of-life-in-rheumatology
#19
REVIEW
Marco Krasselt, Christoph Baerwald
Inflammatory rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) show a striking female predominance ranging from 3:1 in RA up to 9:1 in SLE. The background for those gender bias is not fully understood yet, but seems to be the result of a complex interaction between sex hormones, (epi-)genetics, and possibly even the composition of gut microbiota. Moreover, time of disease onset, the clinical phenotype including co-morbidities as well as the course of the diseases during life differ between genders...
August 9, 2017: Clinical Reviews in Allergy & Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28768369/recent-developments-in-understanding-the-role-of-the-gut-microbiota-in-brain-health-and-disease
#20
REVIEW
Eoin Sherwin, Timothy G Dinan, John F Cryan
There is a growing appreciation of the role of the gut microbiota in all aspects of health and disease, including brain health. Indeed, roles for the bacterial commensals in various psychiatric and neurological conditions, such as depression, autism, stroke, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease, are emerging. Microbiota dysregulation has been documented in all of these conditions or in animal models thereof. Moreover, depletion or modulation of the gut microbiota can affect the severity of the central pathology or behavioral deficits observed in a variety of brain disorders...
August 2, 2017: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
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