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Dyslexia speech perception

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29879142/short-term-adaptation-to-sound-statistics-is-unimpaired-in-developmental-dyslexia
#1
Yafit Gabay, Lori L Holt
Developmental dyslexia is presumed to arise from phonological impairments. Accordingly, people with dyslexia show speech perception deficits taken as indication of impoverished phonological representations. However, the nature of speech perception deficits in those with dyslexia remains elusive. Specifically, there is no agreement as to whether speech perception deficits arise from speech-specific processing impairments, or from general auditory impairments that might be either specific to temporal processing or more general...
2018: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29609008/atypical-cortical-entrainment-to-speech-in-the-right-hemisphere-underpins-phonemic-deficits-in-dyslexia
#2
Giovanni M Di Liberto, Varghese Peter, Marina Kalashnikova, Usha Goswami, Denis Burnham, Edmund C Lalor
Developmental dyslexia is a multifaceted disorder of learning primarily manifested by difficulties in reading, spelling, and phonological processing. Neural studies suggest that phonological difficulties may reflect impairments in fundamental cortical oscillatory mechanisms. Here we examine cortical mechanisms in children (6-12 years of age) with or without dyslexia (utilising both age- and reading-level-matched controls) using electroencephalography (EEG). EEG data were recorded as participants listened to an audio-story...
July 15, 2018: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29587419/enhanced-sensitivity-to-subphonemic-segments-in-dyslexia-a-new-instance-of-allophonic-perception
#3
Willy Serniclaes, M'ballo Seck
Although dyslexia can be individuated in many different ways, it has only three discernable sources: a visual deficit that affects the perception of letters, a phonological deficit that affects the perception of speech sounds, and an audio-visual deficit that disturbs the association of letters with speech sounds. However, the very nature of each of these core deficits remains debatable. The phonological deficit in dyslexia, which is generally attributed to a deficit of phonological awareness, might result from a specific mode of speech perception characterized by the use of allophonic (i...
March 26, 2018: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29352968/children-with-dyslexia-show-a-reduced-processing-benefit-from-bimodal-speech-information-compared-to-their-typically-developing-peers
#4
Gesa Schaadt, Elke van der Meer, Ann Pannekamp, Regine Oberecker, Claudia Männel
During information processing, individuals benefit from bimodally presented input, as has been demonstrated for speech perception (i.e., printed letters and speech sounds) or the perception of emotional expressions (i.e., facial expression and voice tuning). While typically developing individuals show this bimodal benefit, school children with dyslexia do not. Currently, it is unknown whether the bimodal processing deficit in dyslexia also occurs for visual-auditory speech processing that is independent of reading and spelling acquisition (i...
January 17, 2018: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29157996/longitudinal-interactions-between-brain-and-cognitive-measures-on-reading-development-from-6-months-to-14-years
#5
Kaisa Lohvansuu, Jarmo A Hämäläinen, Leena Ervast, Heikki Lyytinen, Paavo H T Leppänen
Dyslexia is a neurobiological disorder impairing learning to read. Brain responses of infants at genetic risk for dyslexia are abnormal already at birth, and associations from infant speech perception to preschool cognitive skills and reading in early school years have been documented, but there are no studies showing predicting power until adolescence. Here we show that in at-risk infants, brain activation to pseudowords at left hemisphere predicts 44% of reading speed at 14 years, and even improves the prediction after taking into account neurocognitive preschool measures of letter naming, phonology, and verbal short-term memory...
January 8, 2018: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28938227/do-prereaders-auditory-processing-and-speech-perception-predict-later-literacy
#6
Sophie Vanvooren, Hanne Poelmans, Astrid De Vos, Pol Ghesquière, Jan Wouters
Developmental dyslexia has frequently been linked to deficits in auditory processing and speech perception. However, the presence and precise nature of these deficits and the direction of their relation with reading, remains debated. In this longitudinal study, 87 five-year-olds at high and low family risk for dyslexia were followed before and during different stages of reading acquisition. The processing of different auditory cues was investigated, together with performance on speech perception and phonology and reading...
September 19, 2017: Research in Developmental Disabilities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28712970/cortical-responses-to-tone-and-phoneme-mismatch-as-a-predictor-of-dyslexia-a-systematic-review
#7
Susanne Volkmer, Gerd Schulte-Körne
Evidence from event-related-potential (ERP) studies has repeatedly shown differences in the perception and processing of auditory stimuli in children with dyslexia compared to control children. The mismatch negativity (MMN) - an ERP component reflecting passive auditory change detection ability - has been found to be reduced, not only in children with a diagnosis of dyslexia, but also in infants and preschool children at risk of developing dyslexia. However, the results are controversial due to the different methods, age of the children and stimuli used...
January 2018: Schizophrenia Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28608732/beyond-auditory-sensory-processing-deficits-lexical-tone-perception-deficits-in-chinese-children-with-developmental-dyslexia
#8
Xiuhong Tong, Xiuli Tong, Fung King Yiu
Increasing evidence suggests that children with developmental dyslexia exhibit a deficit not only at the segmental level of phonological processing but also, by extension, at the suprasegmental level. However, it remains unclear whether such a suprasegmental phonological processing deficit is due to a difficulty in processing acoustic cues of speech rhythm, such as rise time and intensity. This study set out to investigate to what extent suprasegmental phonological processing (i.e., Cantonese lexical tone perception) and rise time sensitivity could distinguish Chinese children with dyslexia from typically developing children...
May 2018: Journal of Learning Disabilities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406683/evaluating-the-sources-and-functions-of-gradiency-in-phoneme-categorization-an-individual-differences-approach
#9
Efthymia C Kapnoula, Matthew B Winn, Eun Jong Kong, Jan Edwards, Bob McMurray
During spoken language comprehension listeners transform continuous acoustic cues into categories (e.g., /b/ and /p/). While long-standing research suggests that phonetic categories are activated in a gradient way, there are also clear individual differences in that more gradient categorization has been linked to various communication impairments such as dyslexia and specific language impairments (Joanisse, Manis, Keating, & Seidenberg, 2000; López-Zamora, Luque, Álvarez, & Cobos, 2012; Serniclaes, Van Heghe, Mousty, Carré, & Sprenger-Charolles, 2004; Werker & Tees, 1987)...
September 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383990/revisiting-the-enigma-of-musicians-with-dyslexia-auditory-sequencing-and-speech-abilities
#10
Jennifer Zuk, Paula Bishop-Liebler, Ola Ozernov-Palchik, Emma Moore, Katie Overy, Graham Welch, Nadine Gaab
Previous research has suggested a link between musical training and auditory processing skills. Musicians have shown enhanced perception of auditory features critical to both music and speech, suggesting that this link extends beyond basic auditory processing. It remains unclear to what extent musicians who also have dyslexia show these specialized abilities, considering often-observed persistent deficits that coincide with reading impairments. The present study evaluated auditory sequencing and speech discrimination in 52 adults comprised of musicians with dyslexia, nonmusicians with dyslexia, and typical musicians...
April 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28290075/audio-visual-speech-perception-in-adult-readers-with-dyslexia-an-fmri-study
#11
Jascha Rüsseler, Zheng Ye, Ivonne Gerth, Gregor R Szycik, Thomas F Münte
Developmental dyslexia is a specific deficit in reading and spelling that often persists into adulthood. In the present study, we used slow event-related fMRI and independent component analysis to identify brain networks involved in perception of audio-visual speech in a group of adult readers with dyslexia (RD) and a group of fluent readers (FR). Participants saw a video of a female speaker saying a disyllabic word. In the congruent condition, audio and video input were identical whereas in the incongruent condition, the two inputs differed...
April 2018: Brain Imaging and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28256107/peripheral-and-central-contribution-to-the-difficulty-of-speech-in-noise-perception-in-dyslexic-children
#12
Axelle Calcus, Paul Deltenre, Cécile Colin, Régine Kolinsky
Noise typically induces both peripheral and central masking of an auditory target. Whereas the idea that a deficit of speech in noise perception is inherent to dyslexia is still debated, most studies have actually focused on the peripheral contribution to the dyslexics' difficulties of perceiving speech in noise. Here, we investigated the respective contribution of both peripheral and central noise in three groups of children: dyslexic, chronological age matched controls (CA), and reading-level matched controls (RL)...
May 2018: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28223953/predicting-future-reading-problems-based-on-pre-reading-auditory-measures-a-longitudinal-study-of-children-with-a-familial-risk-of-dyslexia
#13
Jeremy M Law, Maaike Vandermosten, Pol Ghesquière, Jan Wouters
Purpose: This longitudinal study examines measures of temporal auditory processing in pre-reading children with a family risk of dyslexia. Specifically, it attempts to ascertain whether pre-reading auditory processing, speech perception, and phonological awareness (PA) reliably predict later literacy achievement. Additionally, this study retrospectively examines the presence of pre-reading auditory processing, speech perception, and PA impairments in children later found to be literacy impaired. Method: Forty-four pre-reading children with and without a family risk of dyslexia were assessed at three time points (kindergarten, first, and second grade)...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28056152/a-general-audiovisual-temporal-processing-deficit-in-adult-readers-with-dyslexia
#14
Ana A Francisco, Alexandra Jesse, Margriet A Groen, James M McQueen
Purpose: Because reading is an audiovisual process, reading impairment may reflect an audiovisual processing deficit. The aim of the present study was to test the existence and scope of such a deficit in adult readers with dyslexia. Method: We tested 39 typical readers and 51 adult readers with dyslexia on their sensitivity to the simultaneity of audiovisual speech and nonspeech stimuli, their time window of audiovisual integration for speech (using incongruent /aCa/ syllables), and their audiovisual perception of phonetic categories...
January 1, 2017: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27990724/audio-visual-speech-in-noise-perception-in-dyslexia
#15
Thijs van Laarhoven, Mirjam Keetels, Lemmy Schakel, Jean Vroomen
Individuals with developmental dyslexia (DD) may experience, besides reading problems, other speech-related processing deficits. Here, we examined the influence of visual articulatory information (lip-read speech) at various levels of background noise on auditory word recognition in children and adults with DD. We found that children with a documented history of DD have deficits in their ability to gain benefit from lip-read information that disambiguates noise-masked speech. We show with another group of adult individuals with DD that these deficits persist into adulthood...
January 2018: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27942706/the-role-of-categorical-speech-perception-and-phonological-processing-in-familial-risk-children-with-and-without-dyslexia
#16
Britt Hakvoort, Elise de Bree, Aryan van der Leij, Ben Maassen, Ellie van Setten, Natasha Maurits, Titia L van Zuijen
Purpose: This study assessed whether a categorical speech perception (CP) deficit is associated with dyslexia or familial risk for dyslexia, by exploring a possible cascading relation from speech perception to phonology to reading and by identifying whether speech perception distinguishes familial risk (FR) children with dyslexia (FRD) from those without dyslexia (FRND). Method: Data were collected from 9-year-old FRD (n = 37) and FRND (n = 41) children and age-matched controls (n = 49) on CP identification and discrimination and on the phonological processing measures rapid automatized naming, phoneme awareness, and nonword repetition...
December 1, 2016: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27785865/mothers-speak-differently-to-infants-at-risk-for-dyslexia
#17
Marina Kalashnikova, Usha Goswami, Denis Burnham
Dyslexia is a neurodevelopmental disorder manifested in deficits in reading and spelling skills that is consistently associated with difficulties in phonological processing. Dyslexia is genetically transmitted, but its manifestation in a particular individual is thought to depend on the interaction of epigenetic and environmental factors. We adopt a novel interactional perspective on early linguistic environment and dyslexia by simultaneously studying two pre-existing factors, one maternal and one infant, that may contribute to these interactions; and two behaviours, one maternal and one infant, to index the effect of these factors...
January 2018: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27648974/dichotic-listening-as-an-index-of-lateralization-of-speech-perception-in-familial-risk-children-with-and-without-dyslexia
#18
Britt Hakvoort, Aryan van der Leij, Ellie van Setten, Natasha Maurits, Ben Maassen, Titia van Zuijen
Atypical language lateralization has been marked as one of the factors that may contribute to the development of dyslexia. Indeed, atypical lateralization of linguistic functions such as speech processing in dyslexia has been demonstrated using neuroimaging studies, but also using the behavioral dichotic listening (DL) method. However, so far, DL results have been mixed. The current study assesses lateralization of speech processing by using DL in a sample of children at familial risk (FR) for dyslexia. In order to determine whether atypical lateralization of speech processing relates to reading ability, or is a correlate of being at familial risk, the current study compares the laterality index of FR children who did and did not become dyslexic, and a control group of readers without dyslexia...
November 2016: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27628699/people-with-dyslexia-and%C3%A2-heart-chest-skin-digestive-musculoskeletal-vision-learning-speech-and-mental-disorders-were-more-dissatisfied-with-neighbourhoods-scottish-household-survey-2007-2008
#19
Ivy Shiue
Rarely do we know the perception toward neighbourhoods in people specifically with health conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to understand the perception toward neighbourhoods among adults with a series of the existing health conditions in a country-wide and population-based setting. Data were retrieved from and analysed in Scottish Household Survey, 2007-2008. Information on demographics, self-reported health conditions and perception toward neighbourhoods and the surrounding facilities was obtained by household interview...
December 2016: Environmental Science and Pollution Research International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27556908/is-there-a-relationship-between-speech-identification-in-noise-and-categorical-perception-in-children-with-dyslexia
#20
Axelle Calcus, Christian Lorenzi, Gregory Collet, Cécile Colin, Régine Kolinsky
PURPOSE: Children with dyslexia have been suggested to experience deficits in both categorical perception (CP) and speech identification in noise (SIN) perception. However, results regarding both abilities are inconsistent, and the relationship between them is still unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the relationship between CP and the psychometric function of SIN perception. METHOD: Sixteen children with dyslexia, 16 chronological-age controls, and 16 reading-level controls were evaluated in CP of a voicing continuum and in consonant identification in both stationary and fluctuating noises...
August 1, 2016: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
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