Read by QxMD icon Read

neurally assist ventilatory assist

Giovanna Chidini, Daniele De Luca, Giorgio Conti, Paolo Pelosi, Stefano Nava, Edoardo Calderini
OBJECTIVE: Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist has been shown to improve patient-ventilator interaction in children with acute respiratory failure. Objective of this study was to compare the effect of noninvasive neurally adjusted ventilatory assist versus noninvasive flow-triggered pressure support on patient-ventilator interaction in children with acute respiratory failure, when delivered as a first-line respiratory support. DESIGN: Prospective randomized crossover physiologic study...
September 30, 2016: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
Jonne Doorduin, Joeke L Nollet, Lisanne H Roesthuis, Hieronymus W H van Hees, Laurent J Brochard, Christer A Sinderby, Johannes G van der Hoeven, Leo M A Heunks
RATIONALE: Controlled mechanical ventilation is used to deliver lung-protective ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Despite recognized benefits, such as preserved diaphragm activity, partial support ventilation modes may be incompatible with lung-protective ventilation due to high tidal volume and high transpulmonary pressure. As an alternative to high dose sedatives and controlled mechanical ventilation, pharmacologically induced neuromechanical uncoupling of the diaphragm should facilitate lung-protective ventilation under partial support modes...
October 17, 2016: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Jesús Villar, Javier Belda, Jesús Blanco, Fernando Suarez-Sipmann, José Manuel Añón, Lina Pérez-Méndez, Carlos Ferrando, Dácil Parrilla, Raquel Montiel, Ruth Corpas, Elena González-Higueras, David Pestaña, Domingo Martínez, Lorena Fernández, Marina Soro, Miguel Angel García-Bello, Rosa Lidia Fernández, Robert M Kacmarek
BACKGROUND: Patient-ventilator asynchrony is a common problem in mechanically ventilated patients with acute respiratory failure. It is assumed that asynchronies worsen lung function and prolong the duration of mechanical ventilation (MV). Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) is a novel approach to MV based on neural respiratory center output that is able to trigger, cycle, and regulate the ventilatory cycle. We hypothesized that the use of NAVA compared to conventional lung-protective MV will result in a reduction of the duration of MV...
October 13, 2016: Trials
A Demoule, M Clavel, C Rolland-Debord, S Perbet, N Terzi, A Kouatchet, F Wallet, H Roze, F Vargas, C Guerin, J Dellamonica, S Jaber, L Brochard, T Similowski
PURPOSE: Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) is a ventilatory mode that tailors the level of assistance delivered by the ventilator to the electromyographic activity of the diaphragm. The objective of this study was to compare NAVA and pressure support ventilation (PSV) in the early phase of weaning from mechanical ventilation. METHODS: A multicentre randomized controlled trial of 128 intubated adults recovering from acute respiratory failure was conducted in 11 intensive care units...
September 30, 2016: Intensive Care Medicine
Paolo Navalesi, Federico Longhini
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 30, 2016: Intensive Care Medicine
Gianmaria Cammarota, Federico Longhini, Raffaella Perucca, Chiara Ronco, Davide Colombo, Antonio Messina, Rosanna Vaschetto, Paolo Navalesi
BACKGROUND: Compared to pneumatically controlled pressure support (PSP), neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) was proved to improve patient-ventilator interactions, while not affecting comfort, diaphragm electrical activity (EAdi), and arterial blood gases (ABGs). This study compares neurally controlled pressure support (PSN) with PSP and NAVA, delivered through two different helmets, in hypoxemic patients receiving noninvasive ventilation for prevention of extubation failure. METHODS: Fifteen patients underwent three (PSP, NAVA, and PSN) 30-min trials in random order with both helmets...
September 19, 2016: Anesthesiology
B LoVerde, K S Firestone, H M Stein
OBJECTIVE: Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) is a mode of mechanical ventilation that delivers ventilatory support in synchrony to the patient's respiratory needs using NAVA level, a proportionality constant that converts the electrical activity of the diaphragm (Edi) into a peak pressure (PIP). Recent published studies suggest that neonates can control the delivered ventilatory support through neural feedback. Systematically increasing the NAVA level initially increases the PIP while maintaining a constant Edi until an inflection point or breakpoint (BrP) is reached, at which time the PIP plateaus and the Edi signal decreases...
September 15, 2016: Journal of Perinatology: Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association
Merja Kallio, Ulla Koskela, Outi Peltoniemi, Tero Kontiokari, Tytti Pokka, Maria Suo-Palosaari, Timo Saarela
UNLABELLED: Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) improves patient-ventilator synchrony during invasive ventilation and leads to lower peak inspiratory pressures (PIP) and oxygen requirements. The aim of this trial was to compare NAVA with current standard ventilation in preterm infants in terms of the duration of invasive ventilation. Sixty infants born between 28 + 0 and 36 + 6 weeks of gestation and requiring invasive ventilation due to neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) were randomized to conventional ventilation or NAVA...
September 2016: European Journal of Pediatrics
Milind Baldi, Inderpaul Singh Sehgal, Sahajal Dhooria, Digambar Behera, Ritesh Agarwal
Invasive mechanical ventilation is an integral component in the management of critically ill patients. In certain situations, liberation from mechanical ventilation becomes difficult resulting in prolonged ventilation. Patient-ventilator dyssynchrony is a frequently encountered reason for difficult weaning. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) is a novel mode of ventilation that utilizes the electrical activity of diaphragm to pick up respiratory signals and delivers assistance in proportion to the ventilatory requirement of a patient...
June 2016: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
Jianheng Zhang, Qun Luo, Huijin Zhang, Rongchang Chen
The inspiratory pressure is often set by tolerance of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patient during noninvasive pressure support ventilation (PSV). However, physiological effects of this setting remain unclear. This study was undertaken to assess the physiological effect of highest tolerated assist level on COPD patient.  The baseline inspiratory pressure (PS) was titrated by tolerance in 15 severe COPD patients with hypercapnia during acute exacerbation. In addition to the baseline PS, an additional decrease by 25% (PS- = 75% PS) or increase by 25% (PS+ = 125% PS) of PS was applied to the patients...
July 6, 2016: COPD
Adeline Zbrzeski, Yannick Bornat, Brian Hillen, Ricardo Siu, James Abbas, Ranu Jung, Sylvie Renaud
Cervical spinal cord injury can disrupt connections between the brain respiratory network and the respiratory muscles which can lead to partial or complete loss of ventilatory control and require ventilatory assistance. Unlike current open-loop technology, a closed-loop diaphragmatic pacing system could overcome the drawbacks of manual titration as well as respond to changing ventilation requirements. We present an original bio-inspired assistive technology for real-time ventilation assistance, implemented in a digital configurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)...
2016: Frontiers in Neuroscience
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2016: Annals of Intensive Care
R Di Mussi, S Spadaro, C A Volta, T Stripoli, A Armenise, L Pisani, R G Renna, A Civita, G Altamura, F Bruno, S Grasso
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2015: Intensive Care Medicine Experimental
A Demoule, M Clavel, C Rolland-Debord, S Perbet, N Terzi, A Kouatchet, F Wallet, C Guerin, H Roze, F Vargas, J Dellamonica, S Jaber, T Similowski
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2015: Intensive Care Medicine Experimental
Nai-Ying Kuo, Mei-Lien Tu, Tsai-Yi Hung, Shih-Feng Liu, Yu-Hsiu Chung, Meng-Chih Lin, Chao-Chien Wu
BACKGROUND: Patient-ventilator asynchrony is a common problem in mechanically ventilated patients; the problem is especially obvious in COPD. Neutrally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) can improve patient-ventilator asynchrony; however, the effect in COPD patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation is still unknown. The goals of this study are to evaluate the effect of NAVA and conventional weaning mode in patients with COPD during prolonged mechanical ventilation. METHODS: The study enrolled a total of 33 COPD patients with ventilator dependency for more than 21 days in the weaning center...
2016: International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Z Chen, L Z Du
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2, 2016: Zhonghua Er Ke za Zhi. Chinese Journal of Pediatrics
Flavio F Arbex, Maria Clara Alencar, Aline Souza, Adriana Mazzuco, Priscila A Sperandio, Alcides Rocha, Daniel M Hirai, Frederico Mancuso, Danilo C Berton, Audrey Borghi-Silva, Dirceu R Almeida, Denis E O'Donnell, J Alberto Neder
Systolic heart failure is a common and disabling co-morbidity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) which may increase exercise ventilation due to heightened neural drive and/or impaired pulmonary gas exchange efficiency. The influence of heart failure on exercise ventilation, however, remains poorly characterized in COPD. In a prospective study, 98 patients with moderate to very severe COPD [41 with coexisting heart failure; 'overlap' (left ventricular ejection fraction < 50%)] underwent an incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET)...
May 12, 2016: COPD
Sander Roosens, Frank Derriks, Filip Cools
Diaphragmatic paralysis is a rare cause of respiratory distress in the newborn. In this paper, a patient with unilateral phrenic nerve injury after traumatic delivery is presented. The child inadequately responded to standard respiratory supportive measures. Non-invasive neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NIV-NAVA®), providing an optimally synchronized respiratory support proportional to the effort of the patient, resulted in prompt clinical and biological improvement of the patient's respiratory condition...
April 19, 2016: Pediatric Pulmonology
Limin Zhu, Zhuoming Xu, Xiaolei Gong, Jinghao Zheng, Yanjun Sun, Liping Liu, Lu Han, Haibo Zhang, Zhiwei Xu, Jinfen Liu, Peter C Rimensberger
We evaluated the effects of different respiratory assist modes on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and arterial oxygenation in single-ventricle patients after bidirectional superior cavopulmonary anastomosis (BCPA). We hypothesized that preserved auto-regulation of respiration during neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) may have potential advantages for CBF and pulmonary blood flow regulation after the BCPA procedure. We enrolled 23 patients scheduled for BCPA, who underwent pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV), pressure support ventilation (PSV), and NAVA at two assist levels for all modes in a randomized order...
August 2016: Pediatric Cardiology
Yuya Goto, Shinshu Katayama, Atsuko Shono, Yosuke Mori, Yuya Miyazaki, Yoko Sato, Makoto Ozaki, Toru Kotani
BACKGROUND: Patient-ventilator asynchrony is a major cause of difficult weaning from mechanical ventilation. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) is reported useful to improve the synchrony in patients with sustained low lung compliance. However, the role of NAVA has not been fully investigated. CASE PRESENTATION: The patient was a 63-year-old Japanese man with acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to respiratory infection. He was treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for 7 days and survived...
2016: Journal of Intensive Care
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"