keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

neurally assist ventilatory assist

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28515969/application-of-selective-bronchial-intubation-versus-neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-in-the-management-of-unilateral-pulmonary-interstitial-emphysema-an-illustrative-case-and-the-literature-review
#1
Shing-Yan Robert Lee
In the treatment of left-sided pulmonary interstitial emphysema (PIE) in a 23-week neonate, we used two ventilatory strategies: selective bronchial intubation from day 10 to 15 and neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) from day 18 to 26. We compared the effects and adverse effects of these two strategies. On selective bronchial intubation, desaturation was frequent. Fentanyl infusion was required. There was an episode of carbon dioxide retention coupled with hypotension. On NAVA, the neonate was clinically stable without the requirement of sedation...
April 2017: American Journal of Perinatology Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28399118/feasibility-and-physiological-effects-of-non-invasive-neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-niv-nava-in-preterm-infants
#2
Christopher Gibu, Phillip Cheng, Raymond J Ward, Benjamin Castro, Gregory P Heldt
BACKGROUND: Non-invasive Neurally Adjusted Ventilator Assist (NIV-NAVA) was introduced to our clinical practice via a pilot and a randomized observational study to assess its safety, feasibility, and short term physiological effects. METHODS: The pilot protocol applied NIV-NAVA to 11 infants on nasal CPAP, high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC), or nasal IMV (NIMV), in multiple 2-4 h periods of NIV-NAVA for comparison. This provided the necessary data to design a randomized, controlled observational cross-over study in 8 additional infants to compare the physiological effects of NIV-NAVA to NIMV during 2-hour steady state conditions...
April 11, 2017: Pediatric Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28196820/combined-use-of-neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-nava-and-vertical-expandable-prostethic-titanium-rib-veptr-in-a-patient-with-spondylocostal-dysostosis-and-associated-bronchomalacia
#3
Martí Pons-Odena, Alba Verges, Natalia Arza, Francisco José Cambra
Jarcho-Levin syndrome is a rare disorder characterised by defects in vertebral and costal segmentation of varying severity. Respiratory complications are the main cause of death or severe comorbidity due to a restrictive rib cage. A 3 months old infant with Spondylocostal dysostosis and associated bronchomalacia experiencing severe asynchrony during the weaning process is reported. The Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) mode was used to improve adaptation to mechanical ventilation after Vertical Expandable Prosthetic Titanium Ribs (VEPTRs) were implanted...
February 14, 2017: BMJ Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28180985/crossover-study-of-assist-control-ventilation-and-neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist
#4
Sandeep Shetty, Katie Hunt, Janet Peacock, Kamal Ali, Anne Greenough
Some studies of infants with acute respiratory distress have demonstrated that neurally adjusted ventilator assist (NAVA) had better short-term results compared to non-triggered or other triggered models. We determined if very prematurely born infants with evolving or established bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) had a lower oxygenation index (OI) on NAVA compared to assist control ventilation (ACV). Infants were studied for 1 h each on each mode. At the end of each hour, blood gas analysis was performed and the OI calculated...
April 2017: European Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28063223/neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-for-infants-under-prolonged-ventilation
#5
Juyoung Lee, Han-Suk Kim, Young Hwa Jung, Chang Won Choi, Yong Hoon Jun
BACKGROUND: Severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia often leads to prolonged mechanical ventilation lasting several months. Cyanotic episodes frequently occur in these patients, necessitating long-term sedation and/or intermittent muscle paralysis. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) might provide precisely the amount of support that these patients need without sedation. METHODS: We reviewed the medical records of preterm infants who underwent tracheostomy and required mechanical ventilation for >6 months during a period of 6 years...
January 7, 2017: Pediatrics International: Official Journal of the Japan Pediatric Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28013057/neural-control-of-ventilation-prevents-both-over-distension-and-de-recruitment-of-experimentally-injured-lungs
#6
Lukas Brander, Onnen Moerer, Göran Hedenstierna, Jennifer Beck, Jukka Takala, Arthur S Slutsky, Christer Sinderby
BACKGROUND: Endogenous pulmonary reflexes may protect the lungs during mechanical ventilation. We aimed to assess integration of continuous neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (cNAVA), delivering assist in proportion to diaphragm's electrical activity during inspiration and expiration, and Hering-Breuer inflation and deflation reflexes on lung recruitment, distension, and aeration before and after acute lung injury (ALI). METHODS: In 7 anesthetised rabbits with bilateral pneumothoraces, we identified adequate cNAVA level (cNAVAAL) at the plateau in peak ventilator pressure during titration procedures before (healthy lungs with endotracheal tube, [HLETT]) and after ALI (endotracheal tube [ALIETT] and during non-invasive ventilation [ALINIV])...
March 2017: Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27940767/effective-neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-nava-ventilation-in-a-child-with-jeune-syndrome
#7
Gianluca Cosi, Giulia Genoni, Alice Monzani, Barbara Pilan, Maria Lavrano, Federica Ferrero
Jeune syndrome (asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy) is a rare skeletal dysplasia mainly characterized by dystrophy of the thoracic cage. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) is a respiratory support in which pressure assistance is provided in proportion to and synchronous with the electrical activity of the diaphragm. We present the case of a 4-month-old infant with asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy and respiratory failure successfully ventilated with NAVA. In this case, NAVA improved patient-ventilator synchrony, reducing endotracheal secretion and gastric overdistention...
November 2016: Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27919117/noninvasive-neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-in-premature-infants-postextubation
#8
Tarah T Colaizy, Gary J Kummet, Colleen M Kummet, Jonathan M Klein
Background Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) has distinct advantages when used invasively compared with conventional ventilation techniques. Evidence supporting the use of noninvasive NAVA is less robust, especially in the very low birth weight (VLBW) population. Objective To determine whether synchronized noninvasive ventilation via neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NIV NAVA) supports ventilation postextubation in premature infants. Methods A retrospective analysis of a cohort of twenty-four former VLBW (<1...
May 2017: American Journal of Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27918385/neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-in-preterm-infants-with-established-or-evolving-bronchopulmonary-dysplasia-on-high-intensity-mechanical-ventilatory-support-a-single-center-experience
#9
Young Hwa Jung, Han-Suk Kim, Juyoung Lee, Seung Han Shin, Ee-Kyung Kim, Jung-Hwan Choi
OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to report possible improvements in ventilator variables associated with a transition from synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation to neurally adjusted ventilatory assist in preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia who required a high level of mechanical ventilatory support in a single center. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: Neonatal ICU. PATIENTS: Twenty-nine preterm infants with a median gestational age of 25...
December 2016: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27866528/-effect-of-non-invasive-nava-on-the-patients-with-acute-exacerbation-of-chronic-obstructive-pulmonary-disease
#10
D Q Wang, J Luo, X H Xiong, L H Zhu, W W Zhang
Objective: To observe the effect of non-invasive neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NIV-NAVA) on patient-ventilator synchrony and effect of gas exchange in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease compared with NIV-pressure support ventilation (PSV). Methods: This was a prospective study of 40 patients with AECOPD given 30-min trials of NIV with NIV-PSV group (n=20) and NAVA group (n=20) in random order. Arterial blood gas analysis (ABGs), main asynchrony events and asynchrony index were quantified...
November 15, 2016: Zhonghua Yi Xue za Zhi [Chinese medical journal]
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27851526/1891-neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-weaning-of-neonates-with-congenital-diaphragmatic-hernia
#11
Adam Szadkowski, Michael Wilhelm, Jamie Limjoco, David Mcculley, Chuck Leys, Yousef AlAli, Awni Al-Subu
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27821162/physiological-effects-of-invasive-ventilation-with-neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-nava-in-a-crossover-study
#12
Jean-Michel Liet, François Barrière, Bénédicte Gaillard-Le Roux, Pierre Bourgoin, Arnaud Legrand, Nicolas Joram
BACKGROUND: Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) is a mode of assisted mechanical ventilation that delivers inspiratory pressure proportionally to the electrical activity of the diaphragm. To date, no pediatric study has focused on the effects of NAVA on hemodynamic parameters. This physiologic study with a randomized cross-over design compared hemodynamic parameters when NAVA or conventional ventilation (CV) was applied. METHODS: After a baseline period, infants received NAVA and CV in a randomized order during two consecutive 30-min periods...
November 8, 2016: BMC Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27749511/early-noninvasive-neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-versus-noninvasive-flow-triggered-pressure-support-ventilation-in-pediatric-acute-respiratory-failure-a-physiologic-randomized-controlled-trial
#13
Giovanna Chidini, Daniele De Luca, Giorgio Conti, Paolo Pelosi, Stefano Nava, Edoardo Calderini
OBJECTIVE: Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist has been shown to improve patient-ventilator interaction in children with acute respiratory failure. Objective of this study was to compare the effect of noninvasive neurally adjusted ventilatory assist versus noninvasive flow-triggered pressure support on patient-ventilator interaction in children with acute respiratory failure, when delivered as a first-line respiratory support. DESIGN: Prospective randomized crossover physiologic study...
November 2016: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27748627/partial-neuromuscular-blockade-during-partial-ventilatory-support-in-sedated-patients-with-high-tidal-volumes
#14
Jonne Doorduin, Joeke L Nollet, Lisanne H Roesthuis, Hieronymus W H van Hees, Laurent J Brochard, Christer A Sinderby, Johannes G van der Hoeven, Leo M A Heunks
RATIONALE: Controlled mechanical ventilation is used to deliver lung-protective ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Despite recognized benefits, such as preserved diaphragm activity, partial support ventilation modes may be incompatible with lung-protective ventilation due to high Vt and high transpulmonary pressure. As an alternative to high-dose sedatives and controlled mechanical ventilation, pharmacologically induced neuromechanical uncoupling of the diaphragm should facilitate lung-protective ventilation under partial support modes...
April 15, 2017: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27737690/neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-in-patients-with-acute-respiratory-failure-study-protocol-for-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#15
Jesús Villar, Javier Belda, Jesús Blanco, Fernando Suarez-Sipmann, José Manuel Añón, Lina Pérez-Méndez, Carlos Ferrando, Dácil Parrilla, Raquel Montiel, Ruth Corpas, Elena González-Higueras, David Pestaña, Domingo Martínez, Lorena Fernández, Marina Soro, Miguel Angel García-Bello, Rosa Lidia Fernández, Robert M Kacmarek
BACKGROUND: Patient-ventilator asynchrony is a common problem in mechanically ventilated patients with acute respiratory failure. It is assumed that asynchronies worsen lung function and prolong the duration of mechanical ventilation (MV). Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) is a novel approach to MV based on neural respiratory center output that is able to trigger, cycle, and regulate the ventilatory cycle. We hypothesized that the use of NAVA compared to conventional lung-protective MV will result in a reduction of the duration of MV...
October 13, 2016: Trials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27686347/neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-as-an-alternative-to-pressure-support-ventilation-in-adults-a-french-multicentre-randomized-trial
#16
A Demoule, M Clavel, C Rolland-Debord, S Perbet, N Terzi, A Kouatchet, F Wallet, H Roze, F Vargas, C Guerin, J Dellamonica, S Jaber, L Brochard, T Similowski
PURPOSE: Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) is a ventilatory mode that tailors the level of assistance delivered by the ventilator to the electromyographic activity of the diaphragm. The objective of this study was to compare NAVA and pressure support ventilation (PSV) in the early phase of weaning from mechanical ventilation. METHODS: A multicentre randomized controlled trial of 128 intubated adults recovering from acute respiratory failure was conducted in 11 intensive care units...
November 2016: Intensive Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27686344/no-harm-no-benefit-should-we-give-up-with-neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist
#17
EDITORIAL
Paolo Navalesi, Federico Longhini
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2016: Intensive Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27649505/new-setting-of-neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-during-noninvasive-ventilation-through-a-helmet
#18
Gianmaria Cammarota, Federico Longhini, Raffaella Perucca, Chiara Ronco, Davide Colombo, Antonio Messina, Rosanna Vaschetto, Paolo Navalesi
BACKGROUND: Compared to pneumatically controlled pressure support (PSP), neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) was proved to improve patient-ventilator interactions, while not affecting comfort, diaphragm electrical activity (EAdi), and arterial blood gases (ABGs). This study compares neurally controlled pressure support (PSN) with PSP and NAVA, delivered through two different helmets, in hypoxemic patients receiving noninvasive ventilation for prevention of extubation failure. METHODS: Fifteen patients underwent three (PSP, NAVA, and PSN) 30-min trials in random order with both helmets...
December 2016: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27629375/comparing-changing-neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-nava-levels-in-intubated-and-recently-extubated-neonates
#19
B LoVerde, K S Firestone, H M Stein
OBJECTIVE: Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) is a mode of mechanical ventilation that delivers ventilatory support in synchrony to the patient's respiratory needs using NAVA level, a proportionality constant that converts the electrical activity of the diaphragm (Edi) into a peak pressure (PIP). Recent published studies suggest that neonates can control the delivered ventilatory support through neural feedback. Systematically increasing the NAVA level initially increases the PIP while maintaining a constant Edi until an inflection point or breakpoint (BrP) is reached, at which time the PIP plateaus and the Edi signal decreases...
December 2016: Journal of Perinatology: Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27502948/neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-nava-in-preterm-newborn-infants-with-respiratory-distress-syndrome-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#20
Merja Kallio, Ulla Koskela, Outi Peltoniemi, Tero Kontiokari, Tytti Pokka, Maria Suo-Palosaari, Timo Saarela
UNLABELLED: Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) improves patient-ventilator synchrony during invasive ventilation and leads to lower peak inspiratory pressures (PIP) and oxygen requirements. The aim of this trial was to compare NAVA with current standard ventilation in preterm infants in terms of the duration of invasive ventilation. Sixty infants born between 28 + 0 and 36 + 6 weeks of gestation and requiring invasive ventilation due to neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) were randomized to conventional ventilation or NAVA...
September 2016: European Journal of Pediatrics
keyword
keyword
77846
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"