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Chimeric antigen therapy

Erhao Zhang, Jieyi Gu, Jianpeng Xue, Chenyu Lin, Chen Liu, Mengwei Li, Jingchao Hao, Sarra Setrerrahmane, Xiaowei Chi, Weiyan Qi, Jialiang Hu, Hanmei Xu
BACKGROUND: Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) presented on T cell surfaces enable redirection of T cell specificity, which has enormous promise in antitumor therapy. However, excessive activity and poor control over such engineered T cells cause significant safety challenges, such as cytokine release syndrome and organ toxicities. To enhance the specificity and controllable activity of CAR-T cells, we report a novel switchable dual-receptor CAR-engineered T (sdCAR-T) cell and a new switch molecule of FITC-HM-3 bifunctional molecule (FHBM) in this study...
March 20, 2018: Journal of Hematology & Oncology
Sinem Civriz Bozdağ, Meltem Kurt Yüksel, Taner Demirer
Stem cells can be either totipotent, pluripotent, multipotent or unipotent. Totipotent cells have the capability to produce all cell types of the developing organism, including both embryonic and extraembryonic tissues. The Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSC) are the first defined adult stem cells (ASC) that give rise to all blood cells and immune system. Use of HSCs for treatment of hematologic malignancies, which is also called bone marrow (BM) transplantation or peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) transplantation is the pioneer of cellular therapy and translational research...
March 20, 2018: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Nan Chen, Xiaoyu Li, Navin K Chintala, Zachary E Tano, Prasad S Adusumilli
Uniform and strong expression of CD19, a cell surface antigen, on cells of B-cell lineage is unique to hematologic malignancies. Tumor-associated antigen (TAA) targets in solid tumors exhibit heterogeneity with regards to intensity and distribution, posing a challenge for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. Novel CAR designs, such as dual TAA-targeted CARs, tandem CARs, and switchable CARs, in conjunction with inhibitory CARs, are being investigated as means to overcome antigen heterogeneity. In addition to heterogeneity in cancer-cell antigen expression, the key determinants for antitumor responses are CAR expression levels and affinity in T cells...
March 16, 2018: Current Opinion in Immunology
Zhongzhen Yi, Brooke L Prinzing, Felicia Cao, Stephen Gottschalk, Giedre Krenciute
Glioblastoma is the most aggressive primary brain tumor in humans and is virtually incurable with conventional therapies. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy targeting the glioblastoma antigen EphA2 is an attractive approach to improve outcomes because EphA2 is expressed highly in glioblastoma but only at low levels in normal brain tissue. Building upon our previous findings in this area, we generated and evaluated a panel of EphA2-specific CARs. We demonstrate here that T cells expressing CD28...
June 15, 2018: Molecular Therapy. Methods & Clinical Development
Michael C Milone, Vijay G Bhoj
Adoptive cellular therapy using T cells with tumor specificity derived from either natural T cell receptors (TCRs) or an artificial chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has reached late phase clinical testing, with two CAR T cell therapies achieving regulatory approval within the United States in 2017. The effective use of these therapies depends upon an understanding of their pharmacology, which is quite divergent from traditional small molecule or biologic drugs. We review the different types of T cell therapy under clinical development, the factors affecting cellular kinetics following infusion, and the relationship between these cellular kinetics and anti-cancer activity...
March 16, 2018: Molecular Therapy. Methods & Clinical Development
Hamid Reza Mirzaei, Hossein Pourghadamyari, Majid Rahmati, Abbas Mohammadi, Javid Sadri Nahand, Abbas Rezaei, Hamed Mirzaei, Jamshid Hadjati
Recently clinical trials utilizing genetically engineered T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) that is half monoclonal antibody and half T-cell receptor have demonstrated remarkable response in patients with advanced cancers like relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and lymphoma. Moreover, emerging chimeric genome editing tools such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZNFs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas composed of sequence-specific DNA binding module(s) linked to a non-specific DNA cleavage domain have made possible to dramatically expand the ability to manipulate cells aim to treat and/or study a wide range of diseases including cancer...
March 12, 2018: Cancer Letters
Li-Na Zhang, Yongping Song, Delong Liu
The prognosis of adults with relapsed/refractory (R/R) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains dismal even at this day and age. With salvage chemotherapy, only 29% (range 18 to 44%) of the patients with R/R ALL can be induced into complete remission (CR), with a median overall survival (OS) of 4 months (range 2-6 months). Blinatumomab and inotuzumab ozogamycin (IO) are immunotherapeutic agents that increased CR to 80% and extended survival to 7.7 months in this high-risk population of patients. In the last few years, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)--engineered T cells have led to major progress in cancer immunotherapy...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Hematology & Oncology
Lisa M Ebert, Wenbo Yu, Tessa Gargett, Michael P Brown
Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell therapy has been clinically validated as a curative treatment for the difficult to treat malignancies of relapsed/refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and lymphoma. Here, the CAR-T cells are re-directed towards a single antigen, CD19, which is recognised as a virtually ideal CAR target antigen because it has strong, uniform expression on cancer cells, and is otherwise expressed only on healthy B cells, which are 'dispensable'. Notwithstanding the clinical success of CD19-CAR-T cell therapy, its single specificity has driven therapeutic resistance in 30% or more of cases with CD19-negative leukaemic relapses...
March 14, 2018: Biochemical Society Transactions
Francesco Ceppi, Julie Rivers, Colleen Annesley, Navin Pinto, Julie R Park, Catherine Lindgren, Stephanie Mgebroff, Naomi Linn, Meghan Delaney, Rebecca A Gardner
BACKGROUND: The first step in the production of chimeric antigen receptor T cells is the collection of autologous T cells using apheresis technology. The procedure is technically challenging, because patients often have low leukocyte counts and are heavily pretreated with multiple lines of chemotherapy, marrow transplantation, and/or radiotherapy. Here, we report our experience of collecting T lymphocytes for chimeric antigen receptor T-cell manufacturing in pediatric and young adult patients with leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or neuroblastoma...
March 13, 2018: Transfusion
Mei Zhang, Julian A Kim, Alex Yee-Chen Huang
Immunotherapy is revolutionizing cancer treatment. Recent clinical success with immune checkpoint inhibitors, chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy, and adoptive immune cellular therapies has generated excitement and new hopes for patients and investigators. However, clinically efficacious responses to cancer immunotherapy occur only in a minority of patients. One reason is the tumor microenvironment (TME), which potently inhibits the generation and delivery of optimal antitumor immune responses. As our understanding of TME continues to grow, strategies are being developed to change the TME toward one that augments the emergence of strong antitumor immunity...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Brooke L Prinzing, Stephen M Gottschalk, Giedre Krenciute
The outcome for patients with glioblastoma (GBM) remains poor, and there is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutic approaches. T cells genetically modified with chimeric antigen receptor (CARs) hold the promise to improve outcomes since they recognize and kill cells through different mechanisms than conventional therapeutics. Areas covered: This article reviews CAR design, tumor associated antigens expressed by GBMs that can be targeted with CAR T cells, preclinical and clinical studies conducted with CAR T cells, and genetic approaches to enhance their effector function...
March 13, 2018: Expert Review of Anticancer Therapy
Jeannine S McCune
Immunotherapy is now the fourth pillar of cancer therapy, with surgery, radiation, and traditional chemotherapy being the remaining pillars. Over the past decade, enthusiasm for immunotherapy has increased because of, in part, data showing that it consistently improves overall survival in select patients with historically refractory cancers. This issue covers various aspects of immunotherapy ranging from use of 1) chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells to treat patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia; 2) population pharmacokinetic/dynamic modeling to develop new immune checkpoint inhibitors; and 3) simulations of existing population pharmacokinetic models of immunotherapy to minimize waste without compromising exposure and efficacy...
April 2018: Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Vishal Jindal
Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary malignant cancer of brain, which is extremely aggressive and carries a dreadful prognosis. Current treatment protocol runs around radiotherapy, surgical resection, and temozolomide with median overall survival of around 12-15 months. Due to its heterogeneity and mutational load, immunotherapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy can be a promising treatment option for recurrent glioblastoma. Initial phase 1 studies have shown that this therapy is safe without dose-limiting side effects and it also has a better clinical outcome...
March 9, 2018: Molecular Neurobiology
Kenar D Jhaveri, Mitchell H Rosner
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 9, 2018: Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology: CJASN
Meghdad Abdollahpour-Alitappeh, Seyed Masoud Hashemi Karouei, Majid Lotfinia, Amir Amanzadeh, Mahdi Habibi-Anbouhi
Rituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against B-lymphocyte specific antigen CD20, which is used for the treatment of B-cell malignancies. However, the effectiveness of rituximab is limited partly due to treatment resistance. The aim of this study was to develop rituximab-based antibody drug conjugate (ADC) to enhance rituximab activity. In this study, monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE) was covalently conjugated to dithiothreitol -reduced rituximab via a valine-citrulline peptide linker (rituximab-vcMMAE)...
March 9, 2018: Artificial Cells, Nanomedicine, and Biotechnology
Kendra C Foley, Michael I Nishimura, Tamson V Moore
Immunotherapy is a promising method of treatment for a number of cancers. Many of the curative results have been seen specifically in advanced-stage melanoma. Despite this, single-agent therapies are only successful in a small percentage of patients, and relapse is very common. As chemotherapy is becoming a thing of the past for treatment of melanoma, the combination of cellular therapies with immunotherapies appears to be on the rise in in-vivo models and in clinical trials. These forms of therapies include tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, T-cell receptor, or chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells, cytokines [interleukin (IL-2), IL-15, IL-12, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-α, interferon-γ], antibodies (αPD-1, αPD-L1, αTIM-3, αOX40, αCTLA-4, αLAG-3), dendritic cell-based vaccines, and chemokines (CXCR2)...
March 8, 2018: Melanoma Research
Ciprian Tomuleasa, Shigeo Fuji, Cristian Berce, Anca Onaciu, Sergiu Chira, Bobe Petrushev, Wilhelm-Thomas Micu, Vlad Moisoiu, Ciprian Osan, Catalin Constantinescu, Sergiu Pasca, Ancuta Jurj, Laura Pop, Ioana Berindan-Neagoe, Delia Dima, Shigehisa Kitano
Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell technology has seen a rapid development over the last decade mostly due to the potential that these cells may have in treating malignant diseases. It is a generally accepted principle that very few therapeutic compounds deliver a clinical response without treatment-related toxicity, and studies have shown that CAR T-cells are not an exception to this rule. While large multinational drug companies are currently investigating the potential role of CAR T-cells in hematological oncology, the potential of such cellular therapies are being recognized worldwide as they are expected to expand in the patient to support the establishment of the immune memory, provide a continuous surveillance to prevent and/or treat a relapse, and keep the targeted malignant cell subpopulation in check...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Albert T Gacerez, Charles L Sentman
Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapy has shown promise against B cell malignancies in the clinic. However, limited success in patients with solid tumors has prompted the development of new CAR strategies. In this study, a B7H6-specific CAR was combined with different variants of T-bet, a transcription factor that acts as the master regulator to induce a Th1 phenotype in CD4+ T cells, to create more effective CAR T cells. Skewing CD4+ CAR T cells into a Th1 improved CAR T cell functional activity while promoting a robust proinflammatory response against B7H6-expressing tumors...
March 7, 2018: Cancer Gene Therapy
Xiuhua Kang, Li Zhou, Ya-Mei Jian, Shao-An Lan, Fei Xu
BACKGROUND Human lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer-related mortality around the world, although a variety of new therapies have been used in the treatment of this disease. Antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) has revolutionized the field of cancer therapy in recent decades. Unlike traditional chemotherapy that damages the healthy cells, ADC first utilizes monoclonal antibodies to bind tumor-specific antigen targets and then deliver a highly potent cytotoxic agent to kill tumor cells. Thus, ADC can benefit cancer patients because this drug has less severe adverse effects...
March 8, 2018: Medical Science Monitor: International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research
Shinichi Kageyama
Cancer immunotherapies using gene-engineered T cells comprise adoptive transfer of T-cell receptor (TCR) and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) gene-transduced T cells. Although CD19-targeting CAR-T cell therapy is the most progressed, wherein B-cell malignancy is treated efficiently, it also induces cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity, which frequently leads to serious adverse events. Of note, TCR-T cell therapy has been primarily used to target melanoma, resulting in 30%-50% of tumor responses. In clinical trials that target NY-ESO-1-expressing synovial sarcoma, a high efficacy of 50%-60% has been obtained...
2018: [Rinshō Ketsueki] the Japanese Journal of Clinical Hematology
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