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Resuscitation veterinary

A J Shapiro, J M Norris, K L Bosward, J Heller
A Q fever outbreak in a small animal veterinary hospital, associated with a cat caesarean section, initiated a cat seroprevalence study (n = 712) that found circulating antibodies to Coxiella burnetii was highest in cattery-confined breeding cats (9.3%). These findings stimulated interest about potential sources of C. burnetii infection for cats and humans associated with cats. Cat breeders are potentially a group at increased risk of C. burnetii infection, and this study sought to identify potential risk factors...
September 13, 2016: Zoonoses and Public Health
J DeLay
Autopsy of animals that die in the perianesthetic period allows identification of anesthetic and surgical complications as well as preexisting disease conditions that may have contributed to mortality. In most studies to date investigating perianesthetic mortality in animals, inclusion of autopsy data is very limited. This retrospective study evaluated autopsy findings in 221 cases of perianesthetic death submitted to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory from primary care and referral hospitals. Canine (n = 105; 48%) and feline (n = 90; 41%) cases predominated in the study, involving elective (71%) and emergency (19%) procedures...
September 2016: Veterinary Pathology
Duana McBride, Giselle Hosgood, Anthea Raisis, Lisa Smart
OBJECTIVE: To measure platelet closure time (PCT) in dogs during controlled hemorrhagic shock and after fluid resuscitation with hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 130/0.4 or 0.9% sodium chloride. DESIGN: Experimental interventional study. SETTING: University veterinary teaching hospital. ANIMALS: Eleven healthy Greyhounds. INTERVENTIONS: Dogs were anesthetized and had 48 mL/kg of blood removed to induce hemorrhagic shock...
July 2016: Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care
Jennifer A Beninson, Jill M Keller, Mark J Hoenerhoff
An intact adult male guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) went into cardiopulmonary arrest during a surgical procedure, and efforts at resuscitation were unsuccessful. Gross examination revealed a gastric rupture along the greater curvature of the stomach, which was associated with free blood and ingesta in the abdominal cavity, and a 2-cm nodular, partially circumferential, soft-to-firm mass within the pyloric region. Histologically, the pyloric mass was composed of sheets of infiltrative adipocytes expanding the muscular wall...
October 2015: Comparative Medicine
Andrea C Holmes, Louise Clark
BACKGROUND: This retrospective study reviewed compliance to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) teaching at a small animal referral center from January 2009 to June 2013. CPR training commenced in October 2009. This was a lecture format by European specialists in veterinary anesthesia and analgesia. Teaching was originally based on published guidelines. Changes made to the content of the lectures after publication of the Reassessment Campaign on Veterinary Resuscitation (RECOVER) guidelines in 2012 are discussed...
November 2015: Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care
Pamela J Mouser, Jeffrey D Wilson
An apparently healthy adult female Chihuahua was presented for elective ovariohysterectomy. After induction of general anesthesia, but prior to the start of the surgery, air was inadvertently administered to the patient via the i.v. fluid line. The patient convulsed, became apneic, arrested, and died despite attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation. At necropsy, the pericardial sac was incised and filled with water to entirely submerge the intact heart. The right ventricular free wall was punctured, releasing several air bubbles from the right ventricle...
May 2015: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
Dava Cazzolli, Jennifer Prittie
OBJECTIVE: To provide a comprehensive review of the current literature in human and veterinary medicine evaluating the impact of resuscitation fluid choice on patient outcome and adverse effects. DATA SOURCES: Prospective and retrospective studies, experimental models, and review articles in both human and veterinary medicine retrieved via PubMed. HUMAN DATA SYNTHESIS: A series of recent, large, randomized controlled trials in critically ill human patients comparing crystalloid versus colloid driven fluid resuscitation algorithms have demonstrated no outcome benefit with the use of natural or synthetic colloids...
January 2015: Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care
Robin L McIntyre, Kate Hopper, Steven E Epstein
OBJECTIVE: To prospectively describe cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and evaluate factors associated with outcome in dogs and cats with cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA). DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: University teaching hospital. ANIMALS: One hundred twenty-one dogs and 30 cats that underwent CPR. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Supervising clinicians completed a data form immediately following completion of CPR...
November 2014: Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care
Pei-Jie Li, Xiao-Hua Yang, Zheng-Yi Zhang, Wen Cao, Li-Ping Zhang, Jing Qin, Xiao-Dong Wang
BACKGROUND: Recent studies have shown that α2-adrenergic agonists can reduce postresuscitation myocardial injury. This study was undertaken to observe changes of hemodynamics, myocardial injury markers cTnT and cardiac morphology by establishing a cardiopulmonary resuscitation model with rabbits, and to detect whether α-methyl norepinephrine (α-MNE) can reduce the myocardial injury after CPR and improve cardiac function. METHODS: Eighteen health rabbits, weighing 2...
2010: World Journal of Emergency Medicine
Polly A Glover, Elke Rudloff, Rebecca Kirby
OBJECTIVE: To review and summarize the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of hydroxyethyl starch (HES), as well as reported risks and benefits of HES infusion, and to provide administration and monitoring recommendations for HES use in dogs and cats. DATA SOURCES: Veterinary and human peer-reviewed medical literature, including scientific reviews, clinical and laboratory research articles, and authors' clinical experience. SUMMARY: HES solutions are the most frequently used synthetic colloid plasma volume expanders in human and veterinary medicine...
November 2014: Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care
Søren R Boysen, Patricia Dorval
OBJECTIVE: To determine if rapid intravenous administration of lactated Ringer's solution containing 28 mmol/L of l-lactate (L-LRS) can result in an increase in plasma lactate concentration in healthy dogs. DESIGN: Prospective cross over study with a 4-week washout period. SETTING: Veterinary teaching hospital. ANIMALS: Six healthy adult Beagles. INTERVENTIONS: Dogs received 180 mL/kg/h of L-LRS over 60 minutes, followed by a 4-week washout period, then 180 mL/kg/h of 0...
September 2014: Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care
Brian C Young, Jennifer E Prittie, Philip Fox, Linda J Barton
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate traditional and global perfusion parameters in clinical canine shock patients, and to evaluate for occult hypoperfusion as evidenced by low central venous oxygen saturation or high plasma lactate concentrations in clinical patients resuscitated to traditional endpoints. DESIGN: Clinical observational trial designed with a 1-year data entry period and patient follow-up of 28 days posthospital presentation. SETTING: Large, private urban teaching hospital, and emergency and critical care center...
March 2014: Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care
Autumn P Davidson
Prudent veterinary intervention in the prenatal, parturient, and postpartum periods can increase neonatal survival by controlling or eliminating factors contributing to puppy morbidity and mortality. Postresuscitation or within the first 24 hours of a natural delivery, a complete physical examination should be performed by a veterinarian, technician, or knowledgeable breeder. Adequate ingestion of colostrum must occur promptly (within 24 hours) postpartum for puppies and kittens to acquire passive immunity.
March 2014: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
Lee Palmer, Linda Martin
OBJECTIVE: To discuss the current resuscitative strategies for trauma-induced hemorrhagic shock and acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC). ETIOLOGY: Hemorrhagic shock can be acutely fatal if not immediately and appropriately treated. The primary tenets of hemorrhagic shock resuscitation are to arrest hemorrhage and restore the effective circulating volume. Large volumes of isotonic crystalloids have been the resuscitative strategy of choice; however, data from experimental animal models and retrospective human analyses now recognize that large-volume fluid resuscitation in uncontrolled hemorrhage may be deleterious...
January 2014: Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care
Lee Palmer, Linda Martin
OBJECTIVE: To review the current literature in reference to the pathophysiology and diagnostic modalities available for acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) in relationship to traumatic hemorrhagic shock. ETIOLOGY: Posttraumatic hemorrhage is responsible for one of the leading causes of preventable human deaths worldwide. Acute traumatic coagulopathy is an endogenous hypocoagulable condition that has been observed during the immediate (< 1 hour) posttraumatic period...
January 2014: Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care
A Viljoen, P C Page, G T Fosgate, M N Saulez
REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: Clinical indications for hydroxyethyl starches (HES) in horses include rapid plasma volume expansion and oncotic support during periods of hypoproteinaemia. Side effects such as coagulopathies associated with HES administration pose limitations to their use in veterinary medicine. In man, tetrastarch (130/0.4) has demonstrated less profound effects on coagulation compared with first- and second-generation HES. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the haemostatic and oncotic effects of tetrastarch (130/0...
November 2014: Equine Veterinary Journal
James H Kidwell, Gareth J Buckley, Ashley E Allen, Carsten Bandt
Ivermectin toxicosis in cats is infrequently reported. IV lipid emulsion (ILE) is a novel treatment in veterinary medicine that has been used for amelioration of adverse effects seen with multiple lipid soluble compounds. Previously, ILE has been investigated in experimental models with rats, rabbits, pigs, and dogs, mainly for resuscitation of cardiopulmonary arrest and treatment of hypotension due to local anesthetic drug overdose. There are few case reports in veterinary medicine of using ILE for drug toxicity...
January 2014: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
M Mutinati, M Pantaleo, M Roncetti, M Piccinno, A Rizzo, R L Sciorsci
Free radicals are highly reactive oxidizing agents containing one or more unpaired electrons. Both in human and veterinary neonathology, it is generally accepted that oxidative stress functions as an important catalysator of neonatal disease. Soon after birth, many sudden physiological and environmental conditions make the newborn vulnerable for the negative effects of oxidative stress, which potentially can impair neonatal vitality. As a clinician, it is important to have in depth knowledge about factors affecting maternal/neonatal oxidative status and the cascades of events that enrol when the neonate is subjected to oxidative stress...
February 2014: Reproduction in Domestic Animals, Zuchthygiene
Amanda L Abelson, Therese E O'Toole, Andrea Johnston, Meghan Respess, Armelle M de Laforcade
OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of acute traumatic coagulopathy in dogs suffering severe trauma and to investigate the association of markers of hypoperfusion with coagulation abnormalities. DESIGN: A prospective observational study performed June, 2009 to February, 2011. SETTING: A university teaching hospital. ANIMALS: Thirty client-owned dogs weighing >5 kilograms that were presented to the Tuft's Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine following severe trauma as defined by an animal trauma triage score (ATT) ≥5 and having received no resuscitation with IV fluids or blood products prior to blood sampling...
July 2013: Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care
Daniel J Fletcher, Manuel Boller
For dogs and cats that experience cardiopulmonary arrest, rates of survival to discharge are 6% to 7%, as compared with survival rates of 20% for people. The introduction of standardized cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines and training in human medicine has led to substantial improvements in outcome. The Reassessment Campaign on Veterinary Resuscitation initiative recently completed an exhaustive literature review and generated a set of evidence-based, consensus cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines in 5 domains: preparedness and prevention, basic life support, advanced life support, monitoring, and postcardiac arrest care...
July 2013: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
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