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HIV neutralizing antibody

Miroslawa Bilska, Haili Tang, David C Montefiori
Env-pseudotyped viruses are valuable reagents for studies of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies. It is often assumed that all particles in the pseudovirus preparations are capable of only a single round of infection, making them a safe alternative to work with live HIV-1. Here we show that some Env-pseudotyped virus preparations give rise to low levels of replication-competent virus (RCV). These levels did not compromise results in the TZM-bl neutralization assay; however, their presence highlights a need to adhere to the same level of biosafety when working with Env-pseuodtyped viruses that is required for work with replication competent HIV-1...
October 19, 2016: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Susan Zolla-Pazner
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 23, 2016: AIDS
Boopathy Ramakrishnan, Karthik Viswanathan, Kannan Tharakaraman, Vlado Dančík, Rahul Raman, Gregory J Babcock, Zachary Shriver, Ram Sasisekharan
Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bNAbs) for viral infections, such as HIV, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and influenza, are increasingly entering clinical development. For influenza, most neutralizing antibodies target influenza virus hemagglutinin. These bNAbs represent an emerging, promising modality for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza due to their multiple mechanisms of antiviral action and generally safe profile. Preclinical work in other viral diseases, such as dengue, has demonstrated the potential for antibody-based therapies to enhance viral uptake, leading to enhanced viremia and worsening of disease...
October 14, 2016: Trends in Microbiology
Ming Sun, Yue Li, Huiwen Zheng, Yiming Shao
The recent discoveries of broadly potent neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies represent a new generation of antiretrovirals for the treatment and prophylaxis. Antibodies are generally considered more effective and safer and have been proved to provide passive protection against mucosal challenge in humanized mice and macaques. Several neutralizing Abs could protect animals against HIV-1 but are not effective when used in an established infected model for therapy. In order to overcome the limitation of antiviral activities, multiple antibody-engineering technologies have been explored to generate "the better" neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 since bNAbs attack viral entry by various mechanisms...
2016: Frontiers in Immunology
Mahmoud Mohammad Yaseen, Mohammad Mahmoud Yaseen, Mohammad Ali Alqudah
Although available antiretroviral therapy (ART) has changed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection to a non-fatal chronic disease, the economic burden of lifelong therapy, severe adverse ART effects, daily ART adherence, and emergence of ART-resistant HIV-1 mutants require prospecting for alternative therapeutic modalities. Indeed, a growing body of evidence suggests that broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibodies (BNAbs) may offer one such feasible alternative. To evaluate their therapeutic potential in established HIV-1 infection, we sought to address recent advances in pre-clinical and clinical investigations in this area of HIV-1 research...
October 14, 2016: International Reviews of Immunology
Tong-Cui Ma, Run-Hong Zhou, Xu Wang, Jie-Liang Li, Ming Sang, Li Zhou, Ke Zhuang, Wei Hou, De-Yin Guo, Wen-Zhe Ho
The Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI), a soybean-derived protease inhibitor, is known to have anti-inflammatory effect in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Macrophages play a key role in inflammation and immune activation, which is implicated in HIV disease progression. Here, we investigated the effect of BBI on HIV infection of peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages. We demonstrated that BBI could potently inhibit HIV replication in macrophages without cytotoxicity. Investigation of the mechanism(s) of BBI action on HIV showed that BBI induced the expression of IFN-β and multiple IFN stimulated genes (ISGs), including Myxovirus resistance protein 2 (Mx2), 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS-1), Virus inhibitory protein (viperin), ISG15 and ISG56...
October 13, 2016: Scientific Reports
Cătălin Buiu, Mihai V Putz, Speranta Avram
The dependency between the primary structure of HIV envelope glycoproteins (ENV) and the neutralization data for given antibodies is very complicated and depends on a large number of factors, such as the binding affinity of a given antibody for a given ENV protein, and the intrinsic infection kinetics of the viral strain. This paper presents a first approach to learning these dependencies using an artificial feedforward neural network which is trained to learn from experimental data. The results presented here demonstrate that the trained neural network is able to generalize on new viral strains and to predict reliable values of neutralizing activities of given antibodies against HIV-1...
October 11, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Luciano Polonelli, Tecla Ciociola, Lisa Elviri, Pier Paolo Zanello, Laura Giovati, Denise C Arruda, Julián E Muñoz, Renato A Mortara, Giulia Morace, Elisa Borghi, Serena Galati, Oriano Marin, Claudio Casoli, Elisabetta Pilotti, Paola Ronzi, Luiz R Travassos, Walter Magliani, Stefania Conti
A phosphorylated peptide, named K40H, derived from the constant region of IgMs was detected in human serum by liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry. Synthetic K40H proved to exert a potent in vitro activity against fungal pathogens, and to inhibit HIV-1 replication in vitro and ex vivo. It also showed a therapeutic effect against an experimental infection by Candida albicans in the invertebrate model Galleria mellonella. K40H represents the proof of concept of the innate role that naturally occurring antibody fragments may exert against infectious agents, shedding a new light upon the posthumous role of antibodies and opening a new scenario on the multifaceted functionality of humoral immunity...
October 11, 2016: Scientific Reports
Kevin K Ariën, Françoise Baleux, Delphine Desjardins, Françoise Porrot, Yves-Marie Coïc, Johan Michiels, Kawthar Bouchemal, David Bonnaffé, Timothée Bruel, Olivier Schwartz, Roger Le Grand, Guido Vanham, Nathalie Dereuddre-Bosquet, Hugues Lortat-Jacob
The CD4 and the cryptic coreceptor binding sites of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein are key to viral attachment and entry. We developed new molecules comprising a CD4 mimetic peptide linked to anionic compounds (mCD4.1-HS12 and mCD4.1-PS1), that block the CD4-gp120 interaction and simultaneously induce the exposure of the cryptic coreceptor binding site, rendering it accessible to HS12- or PS1- mediated inhibition. Using a cynomolgus macaque model of vaginal challenge with SHIV162P3, we report that mCD4.1-PS1, formulated into a hydroxyethyl-cellulose gel provides 83% protection (5/6 animals)...
October 10, 2016: Scientific Reports
Jianhui Tian, Cesar A López, Cynthia A Derdeyn, Morris S Jones, Abraham Pinter, Bette Korber, S Gnanakaran
Heavy glycosylation of the envelope (Env) surface subunit, gp120, is a key adaptation of HIV-1; however, the precise effects of glycosylation on the folding, conformation and dynamics of this protein are poorly understood. Here we explore the patterns of HIV-1 Env gp120 glycosylation, and particularly the enrichment in glycosylation sites proximal to the disulfide linkages at the base of the surface-exposed variable domains. To dissect the influence of glycans on the conformation these regions, we focused on an antigenic peptide fragment from a disulfide bridge-bounded region spanning the V1 and V2 hyper-variable domains of HIV-1 gp120...
October 2016: PLoS Computational Biology
Karen P Coss, Snezana Vasiljevic, Laura K Pritchard, Stefanie A Krumm, Molly Glaze, Sharon Madzorera, Penny L Moore, Max Crispin, Katie J Doores
: The HIV envelope (Env) is extensively modified with host-derived N-linked glycans. The high density of glycosylation on the viral spike limits enzymatic processing resulting in numerous under-processed oligomannose-type glycans. This extensive glycosylation not only shields conserved regions of the protein from the immune system but also act as targets for HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs). In response to the host immune system, the HIV glycan shield is constantly evolving through mutations affecting both the positions and frequencies of potential N-linked glycans (PNGSs)...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Virology
Xunqing Jiang, Max Totrov, Wei Li, Jared M Sampson, Constance Williams, Hong Lu, Xueling Wu, Shan Lu, Shixia Wang, Susan Zolla-Pazner, Xiang-Peng Kong
: The V1V2 region of HIV-1 gp120 harbors a major vulnerable site targeted by a group of broadly neutralizing mAbs such as PG9 through strand-strand recognition. However, this epitope region is structurally polymorphic, as it can also form a helical conformation recognized by RV144 vaccine-induced mAb CH58. This structural polymorphism is a potential mechanism for masking the V1V2 vulnerable site. Designing immunogens that can induce conformation-specific Ab responses may lead to vaccines targeting this vulnerable site...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Virology
Maximilian Muenchhoff, Emily Adland, Owen Karimanzira, Carol Crowther, Matthew Pace, Anna Csala, Ellen Leitman, Angeline Moonsamy, Callum McGregor, Jacob Hurst, Andreas Groll, Masahiko Mori, Smruti Sinmyee, Christina Thobakgale, Gareth Tudor-Williams, Andrew J Prendergast, Henrik Kloverpris, Julia Roider, Alasdair Leslie, Delane Shingadia, Thea Brits, Samantha Daniels, John Frater, Christian B Willberg, Bruce D Walker, Thumbi Ndung'u, Pieter Jooste, Penny L Moore, Lynn Morris, Philip Goulder
Disease-free infection in HIV-infected adults is associated with human leukocyte antigen-mediated suppression of viremia, whereas in the sooty mangabey and other healthy natural hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), viral replication continues unabated. To better understand factors preventing HIV disease, we investigated pediatric infection, where AIDS typically develops more rapidly than in adults. Among 170 nonprogressing antiretroviral therapy-naïve children aged >5 years maintaining normal-for-age CD4 T cell counts, immune activation levels were low despite high viremia (median, 26,000 copies/ml)...
September 28, 2016: Science Translational Medicine
Muntasir Alam, Takeo Kuwata, Kazuya Shimura, Masaru Yokoyama, Kristel Paola Ramirez Valdez, Kazuki Tanaka, Yasuhiro Maruta, Shinya Oishi, Nobutaka Fujii, Hironori Sato, Masao Matsuoka, Shuzo Matsushita
BACKGROUND: HIV-1 typically develops resistance to any single antiretroviral agent. Combined anti-retroviral therapy to reduce drug-resistance development is necessary to control HIV-1 infection. Here, to assess the utility of a combination of antibody and fusion inhibitor treatments, we investigated the potency of monoclonal antibodies at neutralizing HIV-1 variants that are resistant to fusion inhibitors. RESULTS: Mutations that confer resistance to four fusion inhibitors, enfuvirtide, C34, SC34, and SC34EK, were introduced into the envelope of HIV-1JR-FL, a CCR5-tropic tier 2 strain...
September 27, 2016: Retrovirology
Peter Rusert, Roger D Kouyos, Claus Kadelka, Hanna Ebner, Merle Schanz, Michael Huber, Dominique L Braun, Nathanael Hozé, Alexandra Scherrer, Carsten Magnus, Jacqueline Weber, Therese Uhr, Valentina Cippa, Christian W Thorball, Herbert Kuster, Matthias Cavassini, Enos Bernasconi, Matthias Hoffmann, Alexandra Calmy, Manuel Battegay, Andri Rauch, Sabine Yerly, Vincent Aubert, Thomas Klimkait, Jürg Böni, Jacques Fellay, Roland R Regoes, Huldrych F Günthard, Alexandra Trkola
Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) are a focal component of HIV-1 vaccine design, yet basic aspects of their induction remain poorly understood. Here we report on viral, host and disease factors that steer bnAb evolution using the results of a systematic survey in 4,484 HIV-1-infected individuals that identified 239 bnAb inducers. We show that three parameters that reflect the exposure to antigen-viral load, length of untreated infection and viral diversity-independently drive bnAb evolution. Notably, black participants showed significantly (P = 0...
September 26, 2016: Nature Medicine
Myron J Levin, Jane C Lindsey, Susan S Kaplan, Werner Schimana, Jody Lawrence, Monica M McNeal, Mutsa Bwakura-Dangarembizi, Anthony Ogwu, Evans M Mpabalwani, Paul Sato, George Siberry, Margaret Nelson, Darcy Hille, Geoffrey A Weinberg, Adriana Weinberg
OBJECTIVE: Although many HIV-infected (HIV+) and HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) infants have received live rotavirus vaccines since the World Health Organization recommended universal administration of these vaccines to infants, there has been limited prospective information on their safety and immunogenicity in either group of infants. DESIGN/METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial of the safety and immunogenicity of oral pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) administered to HIV+ and HEU infants in 4 African countries...
September 20, 2016: AIDS
Marlies M van Haaren, Tom L G M van den Kerkhof, Marit J van Gils
So far, the development of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine has been unsuccessful. However, recent progress in the field of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) has reinvigorated the search for an HIV vaccine. bNAbs develop in a minority of HIV infected individuals and passive transfer of these bNAbs to non-human primates provides protection from HIV infection. Studies in a number of HIV infected individuals on bNAb maturation alongside viral evolution and escape have shed light on the features important for bNAb elicitation...
September 20, 2016: Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics
Muzamil Ashraf Makhdoomi, Deepti Singh, Ambili Nair Pananghat, Rakesh Lodha, Sushil Kumar Kabra, Kalpana Luthra
Anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) have been extensively tested against pesudoviruses of diverse strains. We generated and characterized HIV-1 primary isolates from antiretroviral naïve infected Indian children, and determined their susceptibility to known NAbs. All the 8 isolates belonged to subtype-C and were R5 tropic. Majority of these viruses were resistant to neutralization by NAbs, suggesting that the bnAbs, known to efficiently neutralize pseudoviruses (adult and pediatric) of different strains, are less effective against pediatric primary isolates...
September 16, 2016: Virology
Toshana L Foster, Harry Wilson, Shilpa S Iyer, Karen Coss, Katie Doores, Sarah Smith, Paul Kellam, Andrés Finzi, Persephone Borrow, Beatrice H Hahn, Stuart J D Neil
Interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) restrict the entry of diverse enveloped viruses through incompletely understood mechanisms. While IFITMs are reported to inhibit HIV-1, their in vivo relevance is unclear. We show that IFITM sensitivity of HIV-1 strains is determined by the co-receptor usage of the viral envelope glycoproteins as well as IFITM subcellular localization within the target cell. Importantly, we find that transmitted founder HIV-1, which establishes de novo infections, is uniquely resistant to the antiviral activity of IFITMs...
October 12, 2016: Cell Host & Microbe
Jeffrey T Safrit, Wayne C Koff
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose is to review recent novel approaches in HIV vaccine research and development being undertaken in the preclinical and early clinical space, as well as related and novel nonvaccine approaches such as genetic delivery of broadly neutralizing antibodies for protection from HIV infection and AIDS. RECENT FINDINGS: We review novel HIV envelope immunogen design, including native trimer and germline targeting approaches as well as genetic delivery of broadly neutralizing antibodies and replicating vector vaccinesSUMMARY: Despite 30+ years of research and development, and billions of dollars spent, a well tolerated and effective HIV vaccine remains a public health priority for any chance of ending the AIDS pandemic...
November 2016: Current Opinion in HIV and AIDS
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