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plant-based diet and diabetes

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28394274/vegetarian-diet-in-chronic-kidney-disease-a-friend-or-foe
#1
REVIEW
Anna Gluba-Brzózka, Beata Franczyk, Jacek Rysz
Healthy diet is highly important, especially in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Proper nutrition provides the energy to perform everyday activities, prevents infection, builds muscle, and helps to prevent kidney disease from getting worse. However, what does a proper diet mean for a CKD patient? Nutrition requirements differ depending on the level of kidney function and the presence of co-morbid conditions, including hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The diet of CKD patients should help to slow the rate of progression of kidney failure, reduce uremic toxicity, decrease proteinuria, maintain good nutritional status, and lower the risk of kidney disease-related secondary complications (cardiovascular disease, bone disease, and hypertension)...
April 10, 2017: Nutrients
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28372259/medicinal-plants-and-phytochemicals-with-anti-obesogenic-potentials-a-review
#2
REVIEW
Ramgopal Mopuri, Md Shahidul Islam
Human mortality has been significantly increased in last few decades due to the increased prevalence of obesity and associated chronic disorders such as type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis. Apart from genetic and medicine or drug related side effects, nearly 90-95% people became obese due to the imbalanced calorie intake and lack of nutritional knowledge. The anti-obesogenic drugs, Orlistat and Sibutramine, which have been duly approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA), USA, work very well on diet-induced obesity however they are not getting popular to the people with overweight/obesity due to the higher cost and severe side effects...
March 29, 2017: Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy, Biomédecine & Pharmacothérapie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28319109/the-broad-study-a-randomised-controlled-trial-using-a-whole-food-plant-based-diet-in-the-community-for-obesity-ischaemic-heart-disease-or-diabetes
#3
N Wright, L Wilson, M Smith, B Duncan, P McHugh
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: There is little randomised evidence using a whole food plant-based (WFPB) diet as intervention for elevated body mass index (BMI) or dyslipidaemia. We investigated the effectiveness of a community-based dietary programme. Primary end points: BMI and cholesterol at 6 months (subsequently extended). SUBJECTS: Ages 35-70, from one general practice in Gisborne, New Zealand. Diagnosed with obesity or overweight and at least one of type 2 diabetes, ischaemic heart disease, hypertension or hypercholesterolaemia...
March 20, 2017: Nutrition & Diabetes
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28271467/diet-and-diabetic-kidney-disease-plant-versus-animal-protein
#4
REVIEW
Ranjani N Moorthi, Colby J Vorland, Kathleen M Hill Gallant
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The goal of this review is to present an overview of the evidence on the effectiveness of plant-based diets in delaying progression of diabetic kidney disease (DKD). RECENT FINDINGS: The ideal quantity of dietary protein has been a controversial topic for patients with DKD. Smaller studies have focused on protein source, plant versus animal, for preventing progression. Limited evidence suggests that dietary patterns that focus on plant-based foods, those that are lower in processed foods, or those that are lower in advanced glycation end products (AGE) may be useful in prevention of DKD progression...
March 2017: Current Diabetes Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28181738/a-comparison-of-the-effects-of-diets-high-in-animal-or-plant-protein-on-metabolic-and-cardiovascular-markers-in-type-2-diabetes-a-randomized-clinical-trial
#5
Stephanie Sucher, Mariya Markova, Silke Hornemann, Olga Pivovarova, Natalia Rudovich, Ralph Thomann, Rosemarie Schneeweiss, Sascha Rohn, Andreas F H Pfeiffer
AIMS: High animal protein diets support body weight and glucose control but may induce insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) while plant protein based diets appear to be metabolically advantageous and reduce cardiovascular events. We therefore compared high animal versus plant protein diets differing in amino acid composition in people with T2DM. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We compared isocaloric diets containing 30% of energy (E%) either as animal (AP) or plant (PP) protein, using newly developed plant protein enriched foods, both combined with 30 E% fat and 40 E% carbohydrates in 44 patients with T2DM over six weeks in a randomized parallel group study...
February 9, 2017: Diabetes, Obesity & Metabolism
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28146277/dietary-guidance-for-pulses-the-challenge-and-opportunity-to-be-part-of-both-the-vegetable-and-protein-food-groups
#6
REVIEW
Stefanie Havemeier, Jennifer Erickson, Joanne Slavin
Pulses are a dry, edible variety of beans, peas, and lentils that have been consumed for 10,000 years. Pulses are rich in plant-based protein and fiber, as well as micronutrients such as iron and potassium. The satiating effect of both fiber and protein assists in managing weight and combating obesity. The high fiber content and low glycemic index of pulses aid people with diabetes in maintaining blood glucose and insulin levels. Pulse consumption may improve serum lipid levels to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease...
March 2017: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28071023/effect-of-food-processing-on-the-physicochemical-properties-of-dietary-fibre
#7
REVIEW
Vasfiye Hazal Ozyurt, Semih Ötles
Products derived from the manufacturing or processing of plant based foods: cereals, fruits, vegetables, as well as algae, are sources of abundant dietary fibre. Diets high in dietary fibre have been associated with the reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and gastrointestinal disorders. These fibre-rich products and byproducts can also fortify foods, increase their dietary fibre content and result in healthy products, low in calories, cholesterol and fat. Traditionally, consumers have chosen foods such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables as sources of dietary fibre...
July 2016: Acta Scientiarum Polonorum. Technologia Alimentaria
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886704/position-of-the-academy-of-nutrition-and-dietetics-vegetarian-diets
#8
Vesanto Melina, Winston Craig, Susan Levin
It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that appropriately planned vegetarian, including vegan, diets are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits for the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. These diets are appropriate for all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, older adulthood, and for athletes. Plant-based diets are more environmentally sustainable than diets rich in animal products because they use fewer natural resources and are associated with much less environmental damage...
December 2016: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27754409/diet-quality-the-greeks-had-it-right
#9
John J B Anderson, David C Nieman
The Mediterranean diet is upheld in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines as an example of an eating pattern that promotes good health, a healthy body weight, and disease prevention throughout the lifespan. The Mediterranean eating pattern is based on a variety of unprocessed plant foods including fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds that are high in polyphenols. The majority of polyphenols arrive in the colon where bacteria degrade them into smaller phenolics that can be translocated via the portal vein to the liver...
October 14, 2016: Nutrients
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27729921/dietary-interventions-for-type-2-diabetes-how-millet-comes-to-help
#10
Jason Kam, Swati Puranik, Rama Yadav, Hanna R Manwaring, Sandra Pierre, Rakesh K Srivastava, Rattan S Yadav
Diabetes has become a highly problematic and increasingly prevalent disease world-wide. It has contributed toward 1.5 million deaths in 2012. Management techniques for diabetes prevention in high-risk as well as in affected individuals, beside medication, are mainly through changes in lifestyle and dietary regulation. Particularly, diet can have a great influence on life quality for those that suffer from, as well as those at risk of, diabetes. As such, considerations on nutritional aspects are required to be made to include in dietary intervention...
2016: Frontiers in Plant Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27697077/medicinal-plants-for-diabetes-treatment-during-pregnancy
#11
Debora Cristina Damasceno, Thais Leal-Silva, Thaigra Sousa Soares, Rafaianne Queiroz Moraes-Souza, Gustavo Tadeu Volpato
Diabetes mellitus is a syndrome of great importance that affects an increasing number of people every day. In particular, diabetes is a common and important disease during pregnancy and is marked by complications, both fetal and maternal, that increase the risks of morbidity and mortality for diabetic pregnant women and their offspring. Drugs such as insulin and hypoglycemic drugs are given to treat diabetes, but regular exercise and adequate diet have also been indicated. Furthermore, coadjutant therapies such as medicinal plants are popularly used to reduce diabetes-induced hyperglycemia, either within or outside the context of pregnancy...
2017: Current Medicinal Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27597745/can-families-eat-better-without-spending-more-improving-diet-quality-does-not-increase-diet-cost-in-a-randomized-clinical-trial-among-youth-with-type-1-diabetes-and-their-parents
#12
Tonja R Nansel, Leah M Lipsky, Miriam H Eisenberg, Aiyi Liu, Sanjeev N Mehta, Lori M B Laffel
BACKGROUND: Although cost is a frequently cited barrier to healthful eating, limited prospective data exist. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association of diet cost with diet quality change. DESIGN: An 18-month randomized clinical trial evaluated a dietary intervention. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: Youth with type 1 diabetes duration ≥1 year, age 8.0 to 16.9 years, receiving care at an outpatient tertiary diabetes center in Boston, MA, participated along with a parent from 2010 to 2013 (N=136)...
November 2016: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27476051/a-comprehensive-review-of-the-literature-supporting-recommendations-from-the-canadian-diabetes-association-for-the-use-of-a-plant-based-diet-for-management-of-type-2-diabetes
#13
REVIEW
Sylvia Rinaldi, Emily E Campbell, John Fournier, Colleen O'Connor, Janet Madill
Type 2 diabetes mellitus is considered one of the fastest growing diseases in Canada, representing a serious public health concern. Thus, clinicians have begun targeting modifiable risk factors to manage type 2 diabetes, including dietary patterns such as a plant-based diets (PBDs). The Canadian Diabetes Association has included PBDs among the recommended dietary patterns to be used in medical nutrition therapy for persons with type 2 diabetes. To support knowledge translation, this review summarizes the current literature relating to PBDs and the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, its clinical applications and its acceptability in the management of type 2 diabetes as well as its application in community settings...
October 2016: Canadian Journal of Diabetes
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27472311/structure-bioactivity-relationships-of-methylxanthines-trying-to-make-sense-of-all-the-promises-and-the-drawbacks
#14
REVIEW
João P Monteiro, Marco G Alves, Pedro F Oliveira, Branca M Silva
Methylxanthines are a group of phytochemicals derived from the purine base xanthine and obtained from plant secondary metabolism. They are unobtrusively included in daily diet in common products as coffee, tea, energetic drinks, or chocolate. Caffeine is by far the most studied methylxanthine either in animal or epidemiologic studies. Theophylline and theobromine are other relevant methylxanthines also commonly available in the aforementioned sources. There are many disseminated myths about methylxanthines but there is increased scientific knowledge to discuss all the controversy and promise shown by these intriguing phytochemicals...
July 27, 2016: Molecules: a Journal of Synthetic Chemistry and Natural Product Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27395419/mediterranean-diet-for-type-2-diabetes-cardiometabolic-benefits
#15
Katherine Esposito, Maria Ida Maiorino, Giuseppe Bellastella, Demosthenes B Panagiotakos, Dario Giugliano
Dietary patterns influence various cardiometabolic risk factors, including body weight, lipoprotein concentrations, and function, blood pressure, glucose-insulin homeostasis, oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial health. The Mediterranean diet can be described as a dietary pattern characterized by the high consumption of plant-based foods, olive oil as the main source of fat, low-to-moderate consumption of fish, dairy products and poultry, low consumption of red and processed meat, and low-to-moderate consumption of wine with meals...
July 9, 2016: Endocrine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27299701/plant-based-dietary-patterns-and-incidence-of-type-2-diabetes-in-us-men-and-women-results-from-three-prospective-cohort-studies
#16
Ambika Satija, Shilpa N Bhupathiraju, Eric B Rimm, Donna Spiegelman, Stephanie E Chiuve, Lea Borgi, Walter C Willett, JoAnn E Manson, Qi Sun, Frank B Hu
BACKGROUND: Plant-based diets have been recommended to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, not all plant foods are necessarily beneficial. We examined the association of an overall plant-based diet and hypothesized healthful and unhealthful versions of a plant-based diet with T2D incidence in three prospective cohort studies in the US. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We included 69,949 women from the Nurses' Health Study (1984-2012), 90,239 women from the Nurses' Health Study 2 (1991-2011), and 40,539 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1986-2010), free of chronic diseases at baseline...
June 2016: PLoS Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27289540/amino-acid-changes-during-transition-to-a-vegan-diet-supplemented-with-fish-in-healthy-humans
#17
Amany Elshorbagy, Fredrik Jernerén, Marianne Basta, Caroline Basta, Cheryl Turner, Maram Khaled, Helga Refsum
PURPOSE: To explore whether changes in dietary protein sources can lower plasma branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), aromatic amino acids and sulfur amino acids (SAAs) that are often elevated in the obese, insulin-resistant state and in type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Thirty-six subjects (mean age 31 ± 2 years) underwent a voluntary abstinence from meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products for 6 weeks, while enriching the diet with fish, in fulfillment of a religious fast...
June 11, 2016: European Journal of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27264059/international-variability-in-diet-and-requirements-of-manganese-causes-and-consequences
#18
REVIEW
Jean H Freeland-Graves, Tamara Y Mousa, Sangyoung Kim
Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element that is critical for human health and development. At the turn of the century when diets were based on whole grains, cereals and other traditional foods, Mn intakes (8-9mg/d) were much greater than that prevalent today (2mg/d). As societies have developed, diets have shifted as part of a nutrition transition, to those that are high in processed foods, fat, and sugar. These foods are virtually devoid of Mn. Thus, dietary Mn has declined substantially throughout the world, as confirmed by several wide-scale, total diet studies...
December 2016: Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27253526/effect-of-a-brown-rice-based-vegan-diet-and-conventional-diabetic-diet-on-glycemic-control-of-patients-with-type-2-diabetes-a-12-week-randomized-clinical-trial
#19
Yu-Mi Lee, Se-A Kim, In-Kyu Lee, Jung-Guk Kim, Keun-Gyu Park, Ji-Yun Jeong, Jae-Han Jeon, Ji-Yeon Shin, Duk-Hee Lee
OBJECTIVE: Several intervention studies have suggested that vegetarian or vegan diets have clinical benefits, particularly in terms of glycemic control, in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D); however, no randomized controlled trial has been conducted in Asians who more commonly depend on plant-based foods, as compared to Western populations. Here, we aimed to compare the effect of a vegan diet and conventional diabetic diet on glycemic control among Korean individuals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Participants diagnosed with T2D were randomly assigned to follow either a vegan diet (excluding animal-based food including fish; n = 46) or a conventional diet recommended by the Korean Diabetes Association 2011 (n = 47) for 12 weeks...
2016: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27159643/whole-food-approach-for-type-2-diabetes-prevention
#20
REVIEW
Pan Xi, Rui Hai Liu
Diet is intimately associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Recently, attention has focused on the contributions of individual nutrients, food groups and eating patterns to the outcome of T2D. High consumption of coffee, whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and nuts are each independently associated with the reduced risk of T2D in high risk, glucose intolerant individuals. Experimental and clinical trials have given insight to the diverse mechanisms that may be responsible for the observed protective effects of certain foods on T2D, including nutrients, phytochemicals and dietary fiber, weight control, enhanced satiety and improvement in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in diabetic patients...
August 2016: Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
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