keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

History of neuroscience

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28728020/neuroscience-inspired-artificial-intelligence
#1
REVIEW
Demis Hassabis, Dharshan Kumaran, Christopher Summerfield, Matthew Botvinick
The fields of neuroscience and artificial intelligence (AI) have a long and intertwined history. In more recent times, however, communication and collaboration between the two fields has become less commonplace. In this article, we argue that better understanding biological brains could play a vital role in building intelligent machines. We survey historical interactions between the AI and neuroscience fields and emphasize current advances in AI that have been inspired by the study of neural computation in humans and other animals...
July 19, 2017: Neuron
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28726177/the-reliability-paradox-why-robust-cognitive-tasks-do-not-produce-reliable-individual-differences
#2
Craig Hedge, Georgina Powell, Petroc Sumner
Individual differences in cognitive paradigms are increasingly employed to relate cognition to brain structure, chemistry, and function. However, such efforts are often unfruitful, even with the most well established tasks. Here we offer an explanation for failures in the application of robust cognitive paradigms to the study of individual differences. Experimental effects become well established - and thus those tasks become popular - when between-subject variability is low. However, low between-subject variability causes low reliability for individual differences, destroying replicable correlations with other factors and potentially undermining published conclusions drawn from correlational relationships...
July 19, 2017: Behavior Research Methods
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28708709/genetics-influence-neurocognitive-performance-at-baseline-but-not-concussion-history-in-collegiate-student-athletes
#3
Graham D Cochrane, Mark H Sundman, Eric E Hall, Matthew C Kostek, Kirtida Patel, Kenneth P Barnes, Caroline J Ketcham
OBJECTIVE: This study investigates 4 single-nucleotide polymorphisms [Apolipoprotein E (APOE), APOE promoter, catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT), and dopamine D2 receptor] that have been implicated in concussion susceptibility and/or cognitive ability in collegiate student-athletes. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Neuroscience laboratory at Elon University. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred fifty division I collegiate student-athletes (66 women, 184 men) from various sports...
July 11, 2017: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28704833/pica-in-a-child-with-anterior-cingulate-gyrus-oligodendroglioma-case-report
#4
Shivani D Rangwala, Matthew K Tobin, Daniel M Birk, Jonathan T Butts, Dimitrios C Nikas, Yoon S Hahn
The anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG) is a continued focus of research as its exact role in brain function and vast connections with other anatomical locations is not fully understood. A review of the literature illustrates the role the ACG likely plays in cognitive and emotional processing, as well as a modulating role in motor function and goal-oriented behaviors. While lesions of the cingulate gyrus are rare, each new case broadens our understanding of its role in cognitive neuroscience and higher order processing...
July 14, 2017: Pediatric Neurosurgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28697264/early-adversity-toxic-stress-and-resilience-pediatrics-for-today
#5
M Denise Dowd
Never before in the history of science have we had better insight into the factors that determine the health and well-being of a person from infancy to adulthood. An expanding body of knowledge is converging from numerous disciplines including neuroscience, education, behavioral science, public health, the social sciences, and medicine. Awareness of the impact of early childhood adversity and toxic stress is growing rapidly among both professionals and the lay public. This calls for a reevaluation of how and what we, as child health care providers, should deliver to maximize our impact on individual health and well-being across the lifespan...
July 1, 2017: Pediatric Annals
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28692700/noise-multisensory-integration-and-previous-response-in-perceptual-disambiguation
#6
Cesare V Parise, Marc O Ernst
Sensory information about the state of the world is generally ambiguous. Understanding how the nervous system resolves such ambiguities to infer the actual state of the world is a central quest for sensory neuroscience. However, the computational principles of perceptual disambiguation are still poorly understood: What drives perceptual decision-making between multiple equally valid solutions? Here we investigate how humans gather and combine sensory information-within and across modalities-to disambiguate motion perception in an ambiguous audiovisual display, where two moving stimuli could appear as either streaming through, or bouncing off each other...
July 10, 2017: PLoS Computational Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28690668/white-opioids-pharmaceutical-race-and-the-war-on-drugs-that-wasn-t
#7
Julie Netherland, Helena Hansen
The US 'War on Drugs' has had a profound role in reinforcing racial hierarchies. Although Black Americans are no more likely than Whites to use illicit drugs, they are 6-10 times more likely to be incarcerated for drug offenses. Meanwhile, a very different system for responding to the drug use of Whites has emerged. This article uses the recent history of White opioids - the synthetic opiates such as OxyContin(®) that gained notoriety starting in the 1990s in connection with epidemic prescription medication abuse among White, suburban and rural Americans and Suboxone(®) that came on the market as an addiction treatment in the 2000s - to show how American drug policy is racialized, using the lesser known lens of decriminalized White drugs...
June 2017: BioSocieties
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28667934/hit-and-brain-reward-function-a-case-of-mistaken-identity-theory
#8
Cory Wright, Matteo Colombo, Alexander Beard
This paper employs a case study from the history of neuroscience-brain reward function-to scrutinize the inductive argument for the so-called 'Heuristic Identity Theory' (HIT). The case fails to support HIT, illustrating why other case studies previously thought to provide empirical support for HIT also fold under scrutiny. After distinguishing two different ways of understanding the types of identity claims presupposed by HIT and considering other conceptual problems, we conclude that HIT is not an alternative to the traditional identity theory so much as a relabeling of previously discussed strategies for mechanistic discovery...
June 28, 2017: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28598194/the-use-of-neurocomputational-models-as-alternatives-to-animal-models-in-the-development-of-electrical-brain-stimulation-treatments
#9
Anne Beuter
Recent publications call for more animal models to be used and more experiments to be performed, in order to better understand the mechanisms of neurodegenerative disorders, to improve human health, and to develop new brain stimulation treatments. In response to these calls, some limitations of the current animal models are examined by using Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease as an illustrative example. Without focusing on the arguments for or against animal experimentation, or on the history of DBS, the present paper argues that given recent technological and theoretical advances, the time has come to consider bioinspired computational modelling as a valid alternative to animal models, in order to design the next generation of human brain stimulation treatments...
May 2017: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals: ATLA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28576567/developing-a-data-sharing-community-for-spinal-cord-injury-research
#10
REVIEW
Alison Callahan, Kim D Anderson, Michael S Beattie, John L Bixby, Adam R Ferguson, Karim Fouad, Lyn B Jakeman, Jessica L Nielson, Phillip G Popovich, Jan M Schwab, Vance P Lemmon
The rapid growth in data sharing presents new opportunities across the spectrum of biomedical research. Global efforts are underway to develop practical guidance for implementation of data sharing and open data resources. These include the recent recommendation of 'FAIR Data Principles', which assert that if data is to have broad scientific value, then digital representations of that data should be Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable (FAIR). The spinal cord injury (SCI) research field has a long history of collaborative initiatives that include sharing of preclinical research models and outcome measures...
May 30, 2017: Experimental Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28562233/relationship-of-phosphodiesterase-4d-pde4d-gene-polymorphisms-with-risk-of-ischemic-stroke-a-hospital-based-case-control-study
#11
Amit Kumar, Shubham Misra, Pradeep Kumar, Ram Sagar, Arti Gulati, Kameshwar Prasad
BACKGROUND: Stroke remains a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Ischemic stroke (IS) accounts for around 80-85% of total stroke and is a complex polygenic multi-factorial disorder which is affected by a complex combination of vascular, environmental, and genetic factors. OBJECTIVE: The study was conducted with an aim to examine the relationship of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of PDE4D (T83C, C87T, and C45T) gene with increasing risk of IS in patients in North Indian population...
May 31, 2017: Neurological Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28536548/complementarity-as-generative-principle-a-thought-pattern-for-aesthetic-appreciations-and-cognitive-appraisals-in-general
#12
Yan Bao, Alexandra von Stosch, Mona Park, Ernst Pöppel
In experimental aesthetics the relationship between the arts and cognitive neuroscience has gained particular interest in recent years. But has cognitive neuroscience indeed something to offer when studying the arts? Here we present a theoretical frame within which the concept of complementarity as a generative or creative principle is proposed; neurocognitive processes are characterized by the duality of complementary activities like bottom-up and top-down control, or logistical functions like temporal control and content functions like perceptions in the neural machinery...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28533456/colour-vision-and-coevolution-in-avian-brood-parasitism
#13
REVIEW
Mary Caswell Stoddard, Mark E Hauber
The coevolutionary interactions between avian brood parasites and their hosts provide a powerful system for investigating the diversity of animal coloration. Specifically, reciprocal selection pressure applied by hosts and brood parasites can give rise to novel forms and functions of animal coloration, which largely differ from those that arise when selection is imposed by predators or mates. In the study of animal colours, avian brood parasite-host dynamics therefore invite special consideration. Rapid advances across disciplines have paved the way for an integrative study of colour and vision in brood parasite-host systems...
July 5, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28521154/-the-world-is-upside-down-the-innsbruck-goggle-experiments-of-theodor-erismann-1883-1961-and-ivo-kohler-1915-1985
#14
Pierre Sachse, Ursula Beermann, Markus Martini, Thomas Maran, Markus Domeier, Marco R Furtner
The "Innsbruck Goggle Experiments" on long-term wearing of reversing mirrors, prismatic and half prismatic goggles, and colored half goggles represent a milestone in research on adaptation (adapting to the introduced "disturbance") and after-effects (after removal of the "disturbance"). By means of these goggles it is, for example, possible to invert or distort the visual field (such as flipping top and bottom or left and right), as well as to observe how individuals learn to change the image back to vertical or recognize left and right...
April 23, 2017: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28506440/the-wistar-audiogenic-rat-war-strain-and-its-contributions-to-epileptology-and-related-comorbidities-history-and-perspectives
#15
Norberto Garcia-Cairasco, Eduardo H L Umeoka, José A Cortes de Oliveira
In the context of modeling epilepsy and neuropsychiatric comorbidities, we review the Wistar Audiogenic Rat (WAR), first introduced to the neuroscience international community more than 25years ago. The WAR strain is a genetically selected reflex model susceptible to audiogenic seizures (AS), acutely mimicking brainstem-dependent tonic-clonic seizures and chronically (by audiogenic kindling), temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Seminal neuroethological, electrophysiological, cellular, and molecular protocols support the WAR strain as a suitable and reliable animal model to study the complexity and emergent functions typical of epileptogenic networks...
June 2017: Epilepsy & Behavior: E&B
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28497485/creating-chronicity
#16
Anna Luise Kirkengen
An authentic sickness history is the vantage point for juxtaposing a biomedical and a biographical-phenomenological reading. What, in a biomedical framework, appears to be a longstanding state of comorbidity of different and unrelated types of diseases is rendered transparent in a biographical reading. This particular reading, evidencing the shortcomings of a biomedical framework regarding identifying the social sources of an increasingly complex burden of disease, is reflected upon in light of recent research in the neurosciences...
May 12, 2017: Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28497126/vulnerability-to-depression-in-youth-advances-from-affective-neuroscience
#17
Autumn Kujawa, Katie L Burkhouse
Vulnerability models of depression posit that individual differences in trait-like vulnerabilities emerge early in life and increase risk for the later development of depression. In this review, we summarize advances from affective neuroscience using neural measures to assess vulnerabilities in youth at high risk for depression due to parental history of depression or temperament style, as well as prospective designs evaluating the predictive validity of these vulnerabilities for symptoms and diagnoses of depression across development...
January 2017: Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28468946/novel-mode-of-antagonist-binding-in-nmda-receptors-revealed-by-the-crystal-structure-of-the-glun1-glun2a-ligand-binding-domain-complexed-to-nvp-aam077
#18
Annabel Romero-Hernandez, Hiro Furukawa
Competitive antagonists against N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors have played critical roles throughout the history of neuropharmacology and basic neuroscience. There are currently numerous NMDA receptor antagonists containing a variety of chemical groups. Among those compounds, a GluN2-specific antagonist, (R)-[(S)-1-(4-bromo-phenyl)-ethylamino]-(2,3-dioxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoxalin-5-yl)-methyl-phosphonic acid (NVP-AAM077), contains a unique combination of a dioxoquinoxalinyl ring, a bromophenyl group, and a phosphono group...
July 2017: Molecular Pharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28461475/limitations-of-ex-vivo-measurements-for-in-vivo-neuroscience
#19
Alexander Opitz, Arnaud Falchier, Gary S Linn, Michael P Milham, Charles E Schroeder
A long history of postmortem studies has provided significant insight into human brain structure and organization. Cadavers have also proven instrumental for the measurement of artifacts and nonneural effects in functional imaging, and more recently, the study of biophysical properties critical to brain stimulation. However, death produces significant changes in the biophysical properties of brain tissues, making an ex vivo to in vivo comparison complex, and even questionable. This study directly compares biophysical properties of electric fields arising from transcranial electric stimulation (TES) in a nonhuman primate brain pre- and postmortem...
May 16, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28459656/a-short-guide-to-electrophysiology-and-ion-channels
#20
Hussein Nori Rubaiy
The birth and discovery of electrophysiological science took place in the 18--th century laying the path for our understanding of nerve membrane ionic currents. The pore-forming proteins, ion channels, are involved and play critical roles in very important physiological and pathological processes, such as neuronal signaling and cardiac excitability, therefore, they serve as therapeutic drug targets. The study of physiological, pharmacological and biophysical properties of ion channels can be done by patch clamp, a gold standard and powerful electrophysiological technique...
2017: Journal of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences: a Publication of the Canadian Society for Pharmaceutical Sciences
keyword
keyword
77463
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"