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Driver mutation lung cancer

Tongtong Zhang, Junling Li
BACKGROUND: It has been proven that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), and KRAS are common driver genes in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Molecular targeted therapy increases the overall response rate and progression-free survival (PFS) of patients with EGFR-sensitive mutation or echinoderm microtubule-associated protein like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) fusion. However, target and targeted drugs for lung squamous cell carcinoma to indicate clinical therapy remain to be confirmed...
October 20, 2016: Zhongguo Fei Ai za Zhi, Chinese Journal of Lung Cancer
Kiyohiro Sakai, Masayuki Takeda, Hidetoshi Hayashi, Kaoru Tanaka, Takeshi Okuda, Amami Kato, Yasumasa Nishimura, Tetsuya Mitsudomi, Atsuko Koyama, Kazuhiko Nakagawa
INTRODUCTION: The concept of "oligometastasis" has emerged as a basis on which to identify patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who might be most amenable to curative treatment. Limited data have been available regarding the survival of patients with node-negative oligometastatic NSCLC. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Consecutive patients with advanced NSCLC who attended Kindai University Hospital between January 2007 and January 2016 were recruited to this retrospective study...
September 12, 2016: Thoracic Cancer
Masato Chiba, Yosuke Togashi, Shuta Tomida, Hiroshi Mizuuchi, Yu Nakamura, Eri Banno, Hidetoshi Hayashi, Masato Terashima, Marco A De Velasco, Kazuko Sakai, Yoshihiko Fujita, Tetsuya Mitsudomi, Kazuto Nishio
Several receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) including EGFR, ALK, and MET have been identified as therapeutic targets in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Among the downstream pathways of RTKs, the MAPK pathway is particularly important for cancer cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. In this study, the effects of MEK inhibitors (trametinib and PD0325901) in several NSCLC cell lines with driver gene alterations, especially RTK genes, were tested in vitro using an MTT assay, and a wide range of sensitivities was found...
October 17, 2016: International Journal of Oncology
Sana Saif Ur Rehman, Suresh S Ramalingam
Advanced stage nonsmall cell lung cancer had been treated mainly with platinum-based doublet chemotherapy, and other cytotoxic agents that offered significant survival advantage over best supportive care, until recently. Modest improvements were achieved with the addition of antibodies targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor, and the introduction of maintenance chemotherapy. Improvements in our knowledge of lung cancer biology have shifted the current treatment paradigm from being based on histology to one based on molecular biomarkers...
October 2016: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Ana B Pavel, Cristian I Vasile
Cancer is a complex and heterogeneous genetic disease. Different mutations and dysregulated molecular mechanisms alter the pathways that lead to cell proliferation. In this paper, we explore a method which classifies genes into oncogenes (ONGs) and tumor suppressors. We optimize this method to identify specific (ONGs) and tumor suppressors for breast cancer, lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD), lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC) and colon adenocarcinoma (COAD), using data from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). A set of genes were previously classified as ONGs and tumor suppressors across multiple cancer types (Science 2013)...
August 31, 2016: Journal of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology
David G McFadden, Katerina Politi, Arjun Bhutkar, Frances K Chen, Xiaoling Song, Mono Pirun, Philip M Santiago, Caroline Kim-Kiselak, James T Platt, Emily Lee, Emily Hodges, Adam P Rosebrock, Roderick T Bronson, Nicholas D Socci, Gregory J Hannon, Tyler Jacks, Harold Varmus
Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of cancer are increasingly being used to assess putative driver mutations identified by large-scale sequencing of human cancer genomes. To accurately interpret experiments that introduce additional mutations, an understanding of the somatic genetic profile and evolution of GEMM tumors is necessary. Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing of tumors from three GEMMs of lung adenocarcinoma driven by mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mutant Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras), or overexpression of MYC proto-oncogene...
October 4, 2016: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Magda Bahcall, Taebo Sim, Cloud P Paweletz, Jyoti D Patel, Ryan S Alden, Yanan Kuang, Adrian G Sacher, Nam Doo Kim, Christine Lydon, Mark M Awad, Michael T Jaklitsch, Lynette M Sholl, Pasi A Jänne, Geoffrey R Oxnard
Amplified and/or mutated MET can act as both a primary oncogenic driver and as a promoter of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the landscape of MET-specific targeting agents remains underdeveloped and understanding of mechanisms of resistance to MET TKIs is limited. Here we present a case of a patient with lung adenocarcinoma harboring both a mutation in EGFR and an amplification of MET, who after progression on erlotinib, responded dramatically to combined MET and EGFR inhibition with savolitinib and osimertinib...
September 30, 2016: Cancer Discovery
Toshihide Nishimura, Haruhiko Nakamura
Molecular therapies targeting lung cancers with mutated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by EGFR-tyrosin kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), gefitinib and erlotinib, changed the treatment system of lung cancer. It was revealed that drug efficacy differs by race (e.g., Caucasians vs. Asians) due to oncogenic driver mutations specific to each race, exemplified by gefitinib / erlotinib. The molecular target drugs for lung cancer with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene translocation (the fusion gene, EML4-ALK) was approved, and those targeting lung cancers addicted ROS1, RET, and HER2 have been under development...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Sai-Hong Ignatius Ou, Lauren Young, Alexa B Schrock, Adrienne Johnson, Samuel J Klempner, Viola W Zhu, Vincent A Miller, Siraj M Ali
INTRODUCTION: MET exon14 skipping (METex14) alterations represent a unique subset of oncogenic drivers in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Preliminary clinical activity of crizotinib against METex14+ NSCLC has been reported. The full spectrum of resistance mechanisms to crizotinib in METex14+ NSCLC remains to be identified. METHODS: Hybrid-capture based comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) performed on a tumor specimen obtained at diagnosis and a hybrid capture-based assay of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) at the time of progression on crizotinib was assessed in a pairwise fashion...
September 22, 2016: Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Laura J Tafe, Kirsten J Pierce, Jason D Peterson, Francine de Abreu, Vincent A Memoli, Candice C Black, Jason R Pettus, Jonathan D Marotti, Edward J Gutmann, Xiaoying Liu, Keisuke Shirai, Konstantin H Dragnev, Christopher I Amos, Gregory J Tsongalis
Detection of somatic mutations in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs), especially adenocarcinomas, is important for directing patient care when targeted therapy is available. Here, we present our experience with genotyping NSCLC using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) and the AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel v2. We tested 453 NSCLC samples from 407 individual patients using the 50 gene AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 from May 2013 to July 2015. Using 10 ng of DNA, up to 11 samples were simultaneously sequenced on the Ion Torrent PGM (316 and 318 chips)...
September 2016: Neoplasia: An International Journal for Oncology Research
Le-Le Zhang, Mengyuan Kan, Man-Man Zhang, Sha-Sha Yu, Hui-Jun Xie, Zhao-Hui Gu, Hai-Ning Wang, Shuang-Xia Zhao, Guang-Biao Zhou, Huai-Dong Song, Cui-Xia Zheng
Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may account for resistance after a period of targeted therapies because drugs destroy only a portion of tumor cells. The recognition of ITH helps identify high-risk patients to make effective treatment decisions. However, ITH studies are confounded by interpatient heterogeneity in NSCLC and a large amount of passenger mutations. To address these issues, we recruited NSCLC patients carrying TP53 mutations and selected driver mutations within recurrently mutated genes in NSCLC...
September 20, 2016: International Journal of Cancer. Journal International du Cancer
Nannan Guo, Feng Lou, Yongfu Ma, Jie Li, Bo Yang, Wei Chen, Hua Ye, Jing-Bo Zhang, Ming-Yu Zhao, Wen-Jun Wu, Rong Shi, Lindsey Jones, Katherine S Chen, Xue F Huang, Si-Yi Chen, Yang Liu
Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in peripheral blood is a "liquid biopsy" that contains representative tumor information including gene mutations. Additionally, repeated ctDNA samples can be easily obtained to monitor response to treatment and disease progression, which may be especially valuable to lung cancer patients with tumors that cannot be easily biopsied or removed. To investigate the changes in ctDNA after surgical tumor resection, tumor and blood samples obtained before and after surgery were collected prospectively from 41 non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) patients...
2016: Scientific Reports
Dong Hoon Shin, Donghoon Lee, Dong Wan Hong, Seung Hyun Hong, Jung-Ah Hwang, Byung Il Lee, Hye Jin You, Geon Kook Lee, In-Hoo Kim, Yeon-Su Lee, Ji-Youn Han
The neuregulin 1 (NRG1) fusion is a recently identified novel driver oncogene in invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma of the lung (IMA). After identification of a case of SLC3A2-NRG1 in a patient with IMA, we verified this fusion gene in a cohort of 59 patients with IMA. Targeted cancer panel sequencing and RT-PCR identified the possible coexistence of other driver oncogenes. Among 59 IMAs, we found 16 NRG1 fusions (13 SLC3A2-NRG1 and 3 CD74-NRG1). Of 16 patients with NRG1 fusions, concurrent KRAS codon 12 mutations were found in 10 cases...
September 8, 2016: Oncotarget
Shiyong Li, Yoon-La Choi, Zhuolin Gong, Xiao Liu, Maruja Lira, Zhengyan Kan, Ensel Oh, Jian Wang, Jason C Ting, Xiangsheng Ye, Christoph Reinhart, Xiaoqiao Liu, Yunfei Pei, Wei Zhou, Ronghua Chen, Shijun Fu, Gang Jin, Awei Jiang, Julio Fernandez, James Hardwick, Min Woong Kang, Hoseok I, Hancheng Zheng, Jhingook Kim, Mao Mao
INTRODUCTION: The incidence rate of lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD), the predominant histological subtype of lung cancer, is elevated in Asians, particularly in female nonsmokers. The mutation patterns in LUAD in Asians might be distinct from those in LUAD in whites. METHODS: We profiled 271 resected LUAD tumors (mainly stage I) to characterize the genomic landscape of LUAD in Asians with a focus on female nonsmokers. RESULTS: Mutations in EGFR, KRAS, erb-b2 receptor tyrosine kinase 2 gene (ERBB2), and BRAF; gene fusions involving anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase gene (ALK), ROS1, and ret proto-oncogene (RET); and Met Proto-Oncogene Tyrosine Kinase (MET) exon 14 skipping were the major drivers in LUAD in Asians, exhibiting mutually exclusive and differing prevalence from those reported in studies of LUAD in non-Asians...
September 9, 2016: Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Michael K Kiessling, Sven Schuierer, Silke Stertz, Martin Beibel, Sebastian Bergling, Judith Knehr, Walter Carbone, Cheryl de Vallière, Joelle Tchinda, Tewis Bouwmeester, Klaus Seuwen, Gerhard Rogler, Guglielmo Roma
BACKGROUND: Genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 dropout screens can identify genes whose knockout affects cell viability. Recent CRISPR screens detected thousands of essential genes required for cellular survival and key cellular processes; however discovering novel lineage-specific genetic dependencies from the many hits still remains a challenge. RESULTS: To assess whether CRISPR-Cas9 dropout screens can help identify cancer dependencies, we screened two human cancer cell lines carrying known and distinct oncogenic mutations using a genome-wide sgRNA library...
2016: BMC Genomics
Victoria Villaflor, Brian Won, Rebecca Nagy, Kimberly Banks, Richard B Lanman, AmirAli Talasaz, Ravi Salgia
INTRODUCTION: The potential of oncogene-driven targeted therapy is perhaps most fully realized in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), given the number of genomic targets and approved matched therapies. However, invasive tissue biopsy at the time of each disease progression may not be possible and is associated with high morbidity and cost. Use of newly available "liquid biopsies" can circumvent these issues. RESULTS: 83% of subjects had at least one genomic alteration identified in plasma...
September 1, 2016: Oncotarget
Jeffrey C Thompson, Stephanie S Yee, Andrea B Troxel, Samantha L Savitch, Ryan Fan, David Balli, David B Lieberman, Jennifer D Morrissette, Tracey L Evans, Joshua Bauml, Charu Aggarwal, John A Kosteva, Evan Alley, Christine Ciunci, Roger B Cohen, Stephen Bagley, Susan Stonehouse-Lee, Victoria E Sherry, Elizabeth Gilbert, Corey Langer, Anil Vachani, Erica L Carpenter
PURPOSE: The expanding number of targeted therapeutics for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) necessitates real-time tumor genotyping, yet tissue biopsies are difficult to perform serially and often yield inadequate DNA for next-generation sequencing (NGS). We evaluated the feasibility of using cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) NGS as a complement or alternative to tissue NGS. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: 112 plasma samples obtained from a consecutive study of 102 prospectively enrolled patients with advanced NSCLC were subjected to ultra-deep sequencing of up to 70 genes and matched with tissue samples, when possible...
September 6, 2016: Clinical Cancer Research: An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Fred R Hirsch, Kenichi Suda, Jacinta Wiens, Paul A Bunn
Targeted therapies are substantially changing the management of lung cancers. These treatments include drugs that target driver mutations, those that target presumed important molecules in cancer cell proliferation and survival, and those that inhibit immune checkpoint molecules. This area of research progresses day by day, with novel target discoveries, novel drug development, and use of novel combination treatments. Researchers and clinicians have also extensively investigated the predictive biomarkers and the molecular mechanisms underlying inherent or acquired resistance to these targeted therapies...
September 3, 2016: Lancet
P Neumair, L Joos, R Warschkow, A Dutly, S Ess, F Hitz, M Früh, M Brutsche, F Baty, S Krähenbühl, T Cerny, M Joerger
OBJECTIVES: Controversy exists about the integration of erlotinib in patients with EGFR wildtype, advanced NSCLC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We included patients with advanced NSCLC receiving at least two lines of palliative systemic treatment between January 2005 and December 2014 and not harbouring targetable driver mutations. Primary study endpoint was overall survival (OS), secondary endpoint progression-free survival (PFS). We used Kaplan-Meier statistics, multivariate Cox regression and Propensity score or Inverse Probability Weights (IPW) matching to compare clinical outcome between patients receiving erlotinib in second or further line and those receiving chemotherapy only...
October 2016: Lung Cancer: Journal of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer
Nicolas Guibert, Anne Pradines, Magali Farella, Anne Casanova, Sandrine Gouin, Laura Keller, Gilles Favre, Julien Mazieres
Liquid biopsies are a new non-invasive strategy to detect and monitor the biology of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the era of personalized medicine. KRAS is an oncogenic driver that is mutated in 30% of NSCLCs and is associated with a poor prognosis. 62 samples from 32 patients, treated for metastatic KRAS-mutated lung adenocarcinoma, had DNA extracted from plasma and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) prospectively tested for the presence of KRAS mutations using droplet digital PCR. A KRAS mutation was detected in 82% of patients...
October 2016: Lung Cancer: Journal of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer
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