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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27712198/performance-and-physiological-effects-of-different-descending-strategies-for-cross-country-mountain-biking
#1
Matthew C Miller, Paul W Macdermid, Phil W Fink, Stephen R Stannard
This study investigated the performance-related feasibility and physiological benefits of purposefully eliminating propulsive work while descending in mountain biking and compared values to those measured during road descending. Participants cycled uphill on a road at race pace before descending over three conditions (off-road pedalling; off-road coasting; road coasting). Relatively low power output during off-road pedalling was associated with a greater oxygen uptake (p < .01) when compared with off-road coasting despite no difference in vibration exposure (p > ...
October 6, 2016: European Journal of Sport Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27676877/the-acute-effects-of-dynamic-and-static-stretching-on-the-knee-isokinetic-muscle-strength-and-balance-control-in-athletes
#2
Imen Fekhfekh, Abdelmoneem Yahia, Mokhtar Chaabene, Salma Jribi, Nizar Suissi, Mohamed Habib Elleuch, Sameh Ghroubi
OBJECTIVE: To study the acute effect of static and dynamic stretching on the knee muscle strength and postural capacity in athletes. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fifteen judokas performed 2 stretching protocols (static and dynamic) on the muscles of both lower limbs with an interval of 48hours in a random order. An evaluation of the dominant knee muscle strength with an isokinetic dynamometer CybexNormII was performed before and after each stretching protocol in a concentric mode at a speed of 60 and 180°/s...
September 2016: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27617485/exploring-the-potential-of-cfdna-measurements-after-an-exhaustive-cycle-ergometer-test-as-a-marker-for-performance-related-parameters
#3
Suzan Tug, Matthias Mehdorn, Susanne Helmig, Sarah Breitbach, Tobias Ehlert, Perikles Simon
PURPOSE: Intensive exercise is known to be accompanied by a rapid release of cell free DNA (cfDNA). The physiological significance of cfDNA release for performance diagnostics has not been studied. Here we analysed the release of cfDNA during bicycle exercise and its correlation with physiological parameters. METHODS: Eleven male athletes performed an incremental cycling test. Venous blood was collected before, immediately after exercise and after 90 minutes of recovery...
September 6, 2016: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27304888/low-vitamin-d-levels-do-not-predict-hyperglycemia-in-elderly-endurance-athletes-but-in-controls
#4
Helmuth Haslacher, Sonja Nistler, Delgerdalai Batmyagmar, Elisabeth Ponocny-Seliger, Thomas Perkmann, Thomas M Scherzer, Michael Kundi, Georg Endler, Franz Ratzinger, Alexander Pilger, Oswald F Wagner, Robert Winker
BACKGROUND AND AIM: Recent studies revealed a link between hypovitaminosis D3 and the risk for hyperglycemia. Further mechanistic and interventional investigations suggested a common reason for both conditions rather than a causal relationship. Exposure to sunlight is the most relevant source of vitamin D3 (25(OH)D), whereas adipose tissue is able to store relevant amounts of the lipophilic vitamin. Since running/bicycling leads to increased out-door time and alters physiological response mechanisms, it can be hypothesized that the correlation between hypovitaminosis D3 and hyperglycemia might be disturbed in outdoor athletes...
2016: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27297857/upper-normal-values-of-blood-pressure-response-to-exercise-in-olympic-athletes
#5
Stefano Caselli, Antonia Vaquer Segui, Filippo Quattrini, Barbara Di Gacinto, Alberto Milan, Riccardo Assorgi, Luisa Verdile, Antonio Spataro, Antonio Pelliccia
BACKGROUND: Exercise test is widespread performed in athletes to assess cardiovascular adaptations during effort; however, scarce information exists relative to the behavior of blood pressure during exercise in athletes. We sought to define the normal values and upper limits of blood pressure response to exercise in a large population of elite, healthy athletes. METHODS: A total of 1,876 healthy, normotensive elite athletes (aged 25 ± 6 years, 64% male) underwent a comprehensive clinical evaluation including maximal bicycle exercise test...
July 2016: American Heart Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26287493/exploring-the-athletic-trainer-s-role-in-assisting-student-athletes-presenting-with-alcohol-related-unintentional-injuries
#6
REVIEW
Steven M Howell, Adam E Barry, William A Pitney
Compared with their nonathlete peers, collegiate athletes consume higher quantities of alcohol, drink with greater frequency, and exhibit an increased propensity to engage in heavy episodic drinking (ie, binge drinking), which often may result in alcohol-related consequences. Moreover, collegiate athletes are also more likely to engage in other maladaptive lifestyle behaviors, such as participating in physical fights and riding with an intoxicated driver, and less likely to engage in protective behaviors, such as wearing a helmet while operating a motorcycle, moped, or bicycle...
September 2015: Journal of Athletic Training
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26057422/music-tempo-s-effect-on-exercise-performance-comment-on-dyer-and-mckune
#7
Priscila Missaki Nakamura
Dyer and McKune (2013) stated that music tempo has no influence on performance, physiological, and psychophysical variables in well-trained cyclists during high intensity endurance tasks. However, there are important limitations in the methodology of the study. The participants' music preferences and tempo change were not well measured. It is not possible to affirm that music tempo does not influence athletes' performance. Potential areas of future research include: (a) use of instruments to assess the qualities of music; (b) standardizing music of tempo according to exercise type (e...
June 2015: Perceptual and Motor Skills
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25857276/basal-and-exercise-induced-label-free-quantitative-protein-profiling-of-m-vastus-lateralis-in-trained-and-untrained-individuals
#8
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Marius Schild, Aaron Ruhs, Thomas Beiter, Martina Zügel, Jens Hudemann, Anna Reimer, Ilke Krumholz-Wagner, Carola Wagner, Janine Keller, Klaus Eder, Karsten Krüger, Marcus Krüger, Thomas Braun, Andreas Nieß, Jürgen Steinacker, Frank C Mooren
UNLABELLED: Morphological and metabolic adaptations of the human skeletal muscle to exercise are crucial to improve performance and prevent chronic diseases and metabolic disorders. In this study we investigated human skeletal muscle protein composition in endurance trained (ET) versus untrained individuals (UT) and its modulation by an acute bout of endurance exercise. Participants were recruited based on their VO2max and subjected to a bicycle exercise test. M. vastus lateralis biopsies were taken before and three hours after exercise...
June 3, 2015: Journal of Proteomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25817077/the-effect-of-habitual-physical-training-on-left-ventricular-function-during-exercise-assessed-by-three-dimensional-echocardiography
#9
Mari Sugiura Kojima, Akiko Noda, Seiko Miyata, Jun Kojima, Yuki Hara, Makoto Minoshima, Toyoaki Murohara
BACKGROUND: Stroke volume (SV) in trained athletes continuously increases with progressive exercise intensity. We studied whether physical training affected left ventricle (LV) function response to exercise using 3D echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging (TDI). METHODS: Eleven male university athletes and 12 male university nonathletes were enrolled in this study. After baseline data were collected, subjects performed a symptom-limited supine bicycle ergometer exercise test...
November 2015: Echocardiography
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25474095/joint-torques-and-patellofemoral-force-during-single-leg-assisted-and-unassisted-cycling
#10
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Rodrigo R Bini, Tiago C Jacques, Marco A Vaz
CONTEXT: Unassisted single-leg cycling should be replaced by assisted single-leg cycling, given that this last approach has potential to mimic joint kinetics and kinematics from double-leg cycling. However, there is need to test if assisting devices during pedaling effectively replicate joint forces and torque from double-leg cycling. OBJECTIVES: To compare double-leg, single-leg assisted, and unassisted cycling in terms of lower-limb kinetics and kinematics. DESIGN: Cross-sectional crossover...
February 2016: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25353075/comparison-of-power-output-during-ergometer-and-track-cycling-in-adolescent-cyclists
#11
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Alfred Nimmerichter, Craig A Williams
The aim of this study is to establish the level of agreement between test performance of young elite cyclists in a laboratory and a track field-based trial. Fourteen adolescent cyclists (age: 14.8 ± 1.1 years; (Equation is included in full-text article.): 63.5 ± 5.6 ml·min(-1)·kg(-1)) performed 3 tests of 10 seconds, 1 minute, and 3 minutes on an air-braked ergometer (Wattbike) and on a 250-m track using their own bikes mounted with mobile power meters (SRM). The agreement between the maximum and mean power output (Pmax and Pmean) measured on the Wattbike and SRM was assessed with the 95% limits of agreement (LoA)...
April 2015: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25350031/lactate-minimum-test-during-incremental-running-after-a-submaximal-cycling-exercise-a-novel-test-with-training-applications-for-triathletes
#12
D Vicente-Campous, C Barbado, M J Nuñez, J L Chicharro
AIM: The purpose of the present study was to determine whether running speed determined in a lactate minimum test (lactate minimum intensity, LMI) during a treadmill incremental exercise performed just after submaximal cycling corresponds to the speed of a respiratory exchange ratio of 1.00 (RER-1) and, by extension, to the maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) previously obtained in a standard incremental exercise test. METHODS: Eighteen moderately trained triathletes (15 men, 3 women) underwent two exercise sessions 72 h apart in random order: 1) a standard incremental treadmill test to identify the speed corresponding to RER-1, and 2) a submaximal exercise test on a bicycle-ergometer to obtain the LT (lactate threshold) followed by the incremental portion of the lactate minimum test on the treadmill...
December 2014: Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25301874/no-cardiac-damage-after-endurance-exercise-in-cardiologists-cycling-to-the-european-society-of-cardiology-meeting-in-barcelona
#13
Yolande Appelman, Rogér van der Borgh, Jan Melle van Dantzig, Arend Mosterd, Marcel Daniels, Pieter A Doevendans
AIMS: There are variable results reported for athletes and potential cardiac damage during exercise. In 2009 a group of cardiologists went by bicycle from the Netherlands to the European Society of Cardiology meeting in Barcelona and collected functional and biochemical parameters during this trip in order to evaluate whether cardiac damage was observed in a group of moderately trained amateur cyclists. METHODS AND RESULTS: All of the 20 amateur cyclists (17 men) completed the 1580 km in eight days with an average speed of 27...
September 2015: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25285468/caffeinated-nitric-oxide-releasing-lozenge-improves-cycling-time-trial-performance
#14
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
J Lee, H T Kim, G J Solares, K Kim, Z Ding, J L Ivy
Boosting nitric oxide production during exercise by various means has been found to improve exercise performance. We investigated the effects of a nitric oxide releasing lozenge with added caffeine (70 mg) on oxygen consumption during steady-state exercise and cycling time trial performance using a double-blinded randomized, crossover experimental design. 15 moderately trained cyclists (7 females and 8 males) were randomly assigned to ingest the caffeinated nitric oxide lozenge or placebo 5 min before exercise...
February 2015: International Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25270776/simulated-moderate-hypoxia-reduces-intermittent-sprint-performance-in-games-players
#15
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
G Turner, O R Gibson, N S Maxwell
BACKGROUND: Exercise at altitude places additional physiological stress on the individual in comparison with sea-level performance. This study examines the effect of a moderate hypoxic environment (FiO2=~17%) on intermittent sprint exercise performance. METHODS: Nine male games players completed two consecutive sets of a 40 minute cycling intermittent sprint protocol (CISP×2) in a hypoxic (HYP; FiO2=~17%) and normoxic (NORM; FiO2=~21%) environment. During each sprint peak power output (PPO; the highest power during each 5 s sprint), mean power output (MPO; the average power during the 3 s sprint) were measured and total work done (WD; force applied from the highest 3 s period of power output) was calculated...
October 2014: Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25203649/race-weight-perceptions-of-elite-female-road-cyclists
#16
Eric C Haakonssen, David T Martin, David G Jenkins, Louise M Burke
PURPOSE: This study investigated the satisfaction of elite female cyclists with their body weight (BW) in the context of race performance, the magnitude of BW manipulation, and the association of these variables with menstrual function. METHODS: Female competitors in the Australian National Road Cycling Championships (n = 32) and the Oceania Championships (n = 5) completed a questionnaire to identify current BW, BW fluctuations, perceived ideal BW for performance, frequency of weight consciousness, weight-loss techniques used, and menstrual regularity...
April 2015: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25202846/risk-perception-influences-athletic-pacing-strategy
#17
Dominic Micklewright, David Parry, Tracy Robinson, Greg Deacon, Andrew Renfree, Alan St Clair Gibson, William J Matthews
PURPOSE: The objective of this study is to examine risk taking and risk perception associations with perceived exertion, pacing, and performance in athletes. METHODS: Two experiments were conducted in which risk perception was assessed using the domain-specific risk taking (DOSPERT) scale in 20 novice cyclists (experiment 1) and 32 experienced ultramarathon runners (experiment 2). In experiment 1, participants predicted their pace and then performed a 5-km maximum effort cycling time trial on a calibrated Kingcycle mounted bicycle...
May 2015: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25201712/reproducibility-of-peak-power-output-during-a-10-s-cycling-maximal-effort-using-different-sampling-rates
#18
J P Duarte, Manuel J Coelho-E-Silva, V Severino, D Martinho, L Luz, J R Pereira, R Baptista, J Valente-Dos-Santos, A M Machado-Rodrigues, V Vaz, A Cupido-Dos-Santos, J Martín-Hernández, S P Cumming, R M Malina
The study was aimed to investigate the reproducibility of performance parameters obtained from 10-s maximal cycling effort against different braking forces in young adult athletes. The sample (n = 48) included male athletes aged 18.9-29.9 years (175.5 ± 6.9 cm, 76.2 ± 10.1 kg). The exercise protocol was performed in a cycle-ergometer against a random braking force (4% to 11% of body mass). Intra-individual variation was examined from repeated tests within one week. Descriptive statistics were computed and differences between sessions were tested using paired t-test...
December 2014: Acta Physiologica Hungarica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25128204/identifying-factors-of-bicycle-comfort-an-online-survey-with-enthusiast-cyclists
#19
F S Ayachi, J Dorey, C Guastavino
Racing bicycles have evolved significantly over the past decades as technology and cyclists' comfort have become a critical design issue. Although ample research has been conducted on comfort for other means of transportation, cyclists' perception of dynamic comfort has received scant attention in the scientific literature. The present study investigates how enthusiast cyclists conceptualize comfort using an online survey with 244 respondents. The purpose is to determine which factors contribute to comfort when riding a bicycle, to identify situations in which comfort is relevant and to determine the extent to which vibrations play a role in comfort evaluations...
January 2015: Applied Ergonomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25122995/effect-of-chainring-ovality-on-joint-power-during-cycling-at-different-workloads-and-cadences
#20
Gerda Strutzenberger, Tobias Wunsch, Josef Kroell, Jacqueline Dastl, Hermann Schwameder
Non-circular chainrings theoretically enhance cycling performance by increasing effective chainring diameter and varying crank velocity, but research has failed to consistently reproduce the benefits in cycling trials. The aim of this study was (1) to investigate the effect of different chainring shapes on sagittal knee joint moment and sagittal lower limb joint powers and (2) to investigate whether alterations are affected by cadence and workload. Fourteen elite cyclists cycled in six conditions (70, 90 and 110 rpm, each at 180 and 300 W), for 2 min each, using three chainrings of different ovalities (1...
June 2014: Sports Biomechanics
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