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Shabnam Niroumand, Maliheh Dadgarmoghaddam, Babak Eghbali, Maryam Abrishami, Arash Gholoobi, Hamid Reza Bahrami Taghanaki, Mohammad Khajedaluee
BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus is assumed to be a strong risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and is frequently associated with other CVD risk factors. OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of different patterns of dyslipidemia in individuals with diabetes compared with non-diabetic subjects and evaluate other accompanied CVD risk factors between the two groups. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This was an analytical cross-sectional study on 230 participants, aged 28 - 66 years old, who were referred to different urban health centers of Khorasan Razavi province (north-east of Iran)...
August 2016: Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal
Ummugulsum Can, Muammer Buyukinan, Asuman Guzelant, Ayse Ugur, Adnan Karaibrahimoglu, Sukrıye Yabancıun
BACKGROUND: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a chronic and multifactorial syndrome characterized by a low-grade chronic inflammation, and a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). In our study, we aimed to investigate the serum levels of high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), haptoglobin (Hp), α2-macroglobulin (α2-MG), platelet factor-4 (PF-4), fetuin-A, serum amyloid P (SAP) and α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) in an adolescent population with MetS...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology & Metabolism: JPEM
Satoshi Hoshide, Yuichiro Yano, Hajime Haimoto, Kayo Yamagiwa, Kiyoshi Uchiba, Shoichiro Nagasaka, Yoshio Matsui, Akira Nakamura, Motoki Fukutomi, Kazuo Eguchi, Joji Ishikawa, Kazuomi Kario
OBJECTIVE: The SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial) recently demonstrated that strict blood pressure (BP) control resulted in a lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk compared to standard BP control, however, this association was not observed regarding the incidence of stroke. Previous studies revealed that the contribution of BP as a risk factor was higher for stroke incidence than for any other CVD, especially in Asian populations. It is thus not clear whether the results of the SPRINT can be generalized to all Asian populations...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
V V Muthusamy
Cardiovascular disease burden is increasing all over the world. The diagnosis of hypertension is considered when a person has persistently elevated BP (Systolic BP more than 140 mmHg and/or Diastolic BP more than 90 mmHg). Dyslipidemia denotes abnormal levels of lipids in the blood (Total Cholesterol >200 mg%, Low density lipoprotein (LDL) >100 mg%, Triglycerides (TGL) >150 mg% and High density lipoprotein (HDL) <40 mg in men and < 50 mg in women. Hypertension and Dyslipidemia constitute the important components of metabolic syndrome as per the definition of NCEP Guidelines-Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III)...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Yongsoon Park
A healthy lifestyle is important in CVD prevention and treatment through effects on modifiable CVD risk factors, particularly blood pressure. Although the major drawback is the low level of adherence over time, appropriate lifestyle changes may safely and effectively prevent and treat hypertension. The recommended dietary approaches that have been shown to be capable of reducing blood pressure are: salt restriction, moderation of alcohol consumption, high consumption of vegetables and fruits and low-fat and other types of diet, and weight reduction...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Shokei Kim-Mitsuyama
There is accumulating evidence that RAS inhibitors not only reduce blood pressure, but also exert pleiotropic effects, including a renoprotective effect, amelioration of insulin resistance, reduction in onset of diabetes, and suppression of cardiovascular remodelling,. However, the definite benefit of RAS inhibition in treatment of hypertension with CKD or DM is not conclusive. We previously performed the OlmeSartan and Calcium Antagonists Randomized (OSCAR) study comparing the preventive effect of high-dose ARB therapy versus ARB plus CCB combination therapy on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in 1164 Japanese elderly hypertensive patients with baseline type 2 diabetes and/or CVD (Am J Med (2012))...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Suzanne Oparil
Heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure are leading causes of death worldwide, and hypertension is a significant risk factor for each. Hypertension is less common in women, compared to men, in those younger than 45 years of age. This trend is reversed in those 65 years and older. In the US between 2011-2014, the prevalence of hypertension in women and men by age group was 6% vs 8% (18-39 years), 30% vs 35% (40-59 years), and 67% vs 63% (60 years and over). Awareness, treatment, and control rates differ between genders with women being more aware of their diagnosis (85% vs 80%), more likely to take their medications (81% vs 71%) and more frequently having controlled hypertension (55% vs 49%)...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Hiroshi Itoh
Many hypertension guidelines have been published mainly from Western countries to standardize the management of hypertension all over the world, however, the significance of hypertension, along with other cardio-metabolic risks, such as obesity, diabetes or dyslipidemia should differ among different races. This paper compares the relevance of hypertension, one of the most important cardio-metabolic risk factors, in Asian and Western societies.1) Low target level of blood pressure control for diabetic hypertensives in JapanIn the Japanese Society of Hypertension Guidelines for the management of Hypertension (JSH2014), the target of blood pressure (BP) control in hypertensive patients with diabetes was set as < 130/80 mmHg...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Dorairaj Prabhakaran
Among individuals with established CVD, multiple medications (aspirin, blood pressure lowering drugs and statins) are required to manage CVD and it is well established that non adherence to prescribed treatments is substantial in the long term. Such discontinuation of CV-preventive medications and low adherence rates has been shown to affect the success of CVD prevention efforts. In low- and middle income countries only less than 20% patients receive recommended therapy for CVD prevention, but even in high-income countries treatment coverage in the community is only about 50% in those with heart disease and 35% in those with stroke...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Martin O'Donnell
Salt (sodium chloride) is the primary source of sodium in the diet. Sodium is an essential nutrient, required for normal human physiology. Excess sodium intake is a risk factor for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Observational studies have reported a curvilinear increase in blood pressure with increasing sodium intake, more marked in people with high sodium intakes and hypertension. Interventional clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of reduced sodium intake on reducing blood pressure, although the interventions employed in these trials are not generalizable to most settings (intensive dietary counselling or feeding trials)...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Francesco Cappuccio
The evidence. Salt (i.e. sodium chloride) is causally related to blood pressure (BP). The higher the salt intake, the higher the BP, an effect seen since birth. A small and sustained reduction in salt intake causes a fall in BP. The evidence from controlled studies, small and large, short and long, all agree on the following: (1) salt intake is one of the major determinants of BP in populations and individuals; (2) a reduction in salt intake causes a dose-dependent reduction in BP - the lower the salt the lower the BP; (3) the effect is seen in both sexes, in people of all ages and ethnic groups, and with all starting BPs...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Giovanni Veronesi, Simona Giampaoli, Francesco Gianfagna, Luigi Palmieri, Diego Vanuzzo, Guido Grassi, Giancarlo Cesana, Marco M Ferrario
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical utility of the CAMUNI-MATISS 20-year risk score, recently validated for the Italian population, as additional screening tool for individuals at "low" (ESC-SCORE Project predicted 10-year risk ≤ 1%; no preventive action), "intermediate" (ESC-SCORE 1-4%; lifestyle modification/statin treatment) and "high" risk (ESC-SCORE≥ 4% or diabetes; statin treatment) according to the Italian regulation. DESIGN AND METHOD: 40-65 years old initially CVD-free participants to 7 population-based cohorts enrolled in Northern and Central Italy between 1986 and 1996 were followed-up (median 16 years, IQR: 12-20) to the first occurrence of coronary event or ischemic stroke (fatal or non-fatal), coronary or carotid revascularizations...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Francesco Cappuccio
Current salt consumption in human societies is now much greater than needed for survival. Furthermore, high salt intake substantially increases blood pressure (BP) in both animals and humans. Conversely, a reduction in salt intake causes a dose-dependent reduction in BP in men and women of all ages and ethnic groups, and in patients already on medication. The risk of strokes and heart attacks rises with increasing BP, but can be decreased by anti-hypertensive drugs. However, the majority of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events occur in the numerous individuals with 'normal' BP levels below the 'clinically hypertensive' level which might trigger drug therapy...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Yook Chin Chia
: Many cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk prediction tools have been developed in an attempt to identify those at highest risk in order for them to benefit from interventional treatment. The first CVD risk tool that was developed was the coronary heart disease risk tool by the Framingham Heart Study in 1998 (1). However the Framingham Risk Score could overestimate (or underestimate) risk in populations other than the US population. Hence several other risk engines have also been developed, primarily for a better fit in the communities in which the tools are to be used (2, 3)...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Aletta Schutte
Cardiovascular risk prediction has developed significantly during recent years, as cardiovascular disease prevention guidelines recommend risk scores to identify patients at high and low risk. Where novel biomarkers were identified in recent years, it is simply impractical and expensive to perform laboratory testing as part of screening for non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries. As part of a broader consortium we compared the ranking performance of a simple, non-laboratory-based risk score to laboratory-based scores in various South African populations...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Giovanni Veronesi
In Italy, the European SCORE Project risk score is the recommended tool for cardiovascular disease risk stratification in the primary prevention setting. Among non-diabetic subjects aged 40 to 64, the model estimates the 10-year probability of death due to cardiovascular disease based on individual's age, total cholesterol, blood pressure and smoking status. A growing body of evidence suggests that in middle-aged adults this stratification may suffer from two major drawbacks. First, mortality risk severely underestimates the global burden of disease incidence...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Hyeon Chang Kim
Disease risk prediction models have been developed to assess the impact of multiple risk factors and to estimate an individual's absolute disease risk. Accurate disease prediction is essential for personalized prevention, because the benefits, risks, and costs of alternative strategies must be weighed to choose the best preventive strategy for individual patients. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) prediction is the earliest example of individual risk predictions. Since the Framingham study reported a CVD risk prediction method in 1976, an increasing number of risk assessment tools have been developed to CVD risk in various settings...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Il Suh
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a global leading cause of death nowadays. Fortunately, the majority of risk factors which cause CVD are preventable. The INTERSTROKE study recently reported that about 90% of the population-attributable risk of stroke is associated with ten modifiable risk factors. Especially high blood pressure levels are well established to be associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.Recently CVD mortality has been decreasing in high-income countries but increasing in some middle-income countries and low-income countries...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Fernando Stuardo Wyss Quintana
Latin America has 23 countries ranging from Mexico, Central America, South America and the Caribbean, of these 19 countries are considered by the WHO as countries with high and very high risk, one of the similarities of our countries is poor access to services health and medicine, resulting from poor government investment in health as the amount used in this sector occupies only the best 3% of the national budget and gross domestic product.Thus we know that the prevalence of hypertension varies widely from country to country and from city to city, presenting in Guatemala a prevalence of 40%, while in other countries in the area ranges between 25 and 35%, most complicated problem is that within the same country as the population this prevalence can vary greatly and have a different impact between populationsTherefore we know that the impact of cardiovascular disease within the range of non-communicable diseases occupies at least 30% and of these about 70% occupied countries of low and moderate income...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Rafael Castillo
: Similar to the trend worldwide, hypertension (HTN) is also the single most attributable cause for mortality in South-East Asia (SEA). But while in developed regions, the prevalence of HTN appears to be stabilizing or decreasing, the rates in SEA continue to rise. Around a third of the adult population in SEA have elevated blood pressure (BP) with nearly 1.5 million deaths (9.4% of total deaths) attributable to HTN annually.In several countries in SEA, awareness level of HTN is less than 50% but in the more affluent countries in the region, awareness ranges from 56% to 70%...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
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