Read by QxMD icon Read


Sharone Bar-David
A recent study of patient violence toward hospital physicians and nurses offers a welcome perspective in its classifying of aggressive behaviors as workplace violence. While patients and families are widely recognized as sources of rude behaviors, we need to shed light on passive aggressive and other low-level rude behaviors that take place frequently amongst hospital personnel as well. Studied under the term "workplace incivility," these seemingly insignificant behaviors that show lack of regard for colleagues have far reaching negative consequences...
March 14, 2018: Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
Erika L Sabbath, Jessica A R Williams, Leslie I Boden, Tommaso Tempesti, Gregory R Wagner, Karen Hopcia, Dean Hashimoto, Glorian Sorensen
OBJECTIVE: Bullied workers have poor self-reported mental health; monetary costs of bullying exposure are unknown. We tested associations between bullying and health plan claims for mental health diagnoses. METHODS: We used data from 793 hospital workers who answered questions about bullying in a survey and subscribed to the group health plan. We used two-part models to test associations between types of incivility/bullying and mental health expenditures. RESULTS: Workers experiencing incivility or bullying had greater odds of any mental health claims...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Jiyeon Kang, Yeon Jin Jeong, Kyoung Ran Kong
PURPOSE: This qualitative study aimed to explore the experience of incivility among nursing students. METHODS: Sixteen nursing students who had experienced incivility during their clinical placement were invited for one-on-one interviews until the point of theoretical saturation. The grounded theory approach of Corbin and Strauss was adopted to analyze transcribed interview contents. RESULTS: Incivility occurred in the context of a hierarchical organizational culture, due to nursing students' position as outsiders, non-systematic clinical education, and poor nursing work environment...
February 2018: Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing
Myung Sun Hyun, Jennie C De Gagne, Jeonghwa Park, Hee Sun Kang
BACKGROUND: Incivility behaviors are negative social behaviors that can create conflict and disrespect among the persons involved. In a learning environment, incivility negatively affects learning by reducing academic motivation, lowering satisfaction with the education program, and interrupting the learning process. In addition, incivility causes those involved to feel negative emotions, such as anger, depression, and anxiety. RESEARCH QUESTION: What are the incivility experiences of nursing students during their nursing education? In what context do nursing students experience incivility during their education? RESEARCH DESIGN: This study used an exploratory qualitative methodology...
March 2018: Nursing Ethics
Constance Ann Thomas
Incivility is of great concern in nursing, yet little is known about nursing students' encounters with incivility during clinical education. The lived experience of nursing students who encountered uncivil acts (n = 12) was explored through narrative interviews. Themes describing incivility emerged, including covert criticism and open shaming. Students experienced emotional and physical turmoil, and mixed messages that created a paradox. Further research is needed to understand components of incivility and the negative remnants left by uncivil encounters on nursing students...
April 2018: Journal of Christian Nursing: a Quarterly Publication of Nurses Christian Fellowship
Sara Viotti, Lynnette Essenmacher, Lydia E Hamblin, Judith E Arnetz
In spite of the considerable number of studies on co-worker incivility, knowledge on this topic needs to be further enhanced. In particular, no studies have focused on the reciprocal nature of the relationship of incivility with other important aspects of working life, i.e. employee well-being and the quality of the working process. The aim of the present study was to examine the cross-lagged associations among co-worker incivility, work-related exhaustion, and organisational efficiency in a sample of healthcare workers...
2018: Work and Stress
Joy Longo, Michael A DeDonno
Incivility and bullying in healthcare can impact care delivery and quality. There are challenges in research to making a direct link between the behaviors and patient outcomes. One way to address the challenges is through the creation of bullying vignettes that induce mood changes that reflect a feeling of being bullied. The purpose of this study was to develop workplace bullying textual vignettes and to test content validity. Cognitive interviewing was used by engaging content experts to rate 21 author-created vignettes for relevance, realism, and severity...
March 5, 2018: Issues in Mental Health Nursing
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Nursing Education Perspectives
Heidi Kathleen Holtz, Susan M Rawl, Claire Draucker
BACKGROUND: Faculty incivility can negatively affect student learning outcomes and safe clinical performance, yet little is known about the types of faculty incivility experienced by students. AIM: The aim of this qualitative descriptive study was to describe common types of incidents of faculty incivility as reported by students enrolled in traditional bachelor of science in nursing programs. MEHTOD: Qualitative descriptive methods were used to analyze the narratives of 30 students who had experienced incidents of faculty incivility...
March 2018: Nursing Education Perspectives
Christine A Vaughan, Natalie Colabianchi, Gerald P Hunter, Robin Beckman, Tamara Dubowitz
We examined individual and environmental influences on park use among residents of two low-income predominantly African American neighborhoods to identify determinants of park use in lower-income urban neighborhoods. We analyzed data from interviews of 1003 individuals randomly selected from the neighborhoods, systematic observations of neighborhood parks, and police-recorded crime incidence within a .5-mi buffer around each park. Most participants (82.4%) had previously visited a neighborhood park, and nearly half (46...
February 9, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
Jason A Douglas, Maya Briones, Eliane Bauer, Melissa Trujillo, Melissa Lopez, Andrew M Subica
The current study examined the nexus of neighborhood disorder-in the form of physical disorder (e.g., broken glass and vandalism) and social disorder (e.g., public drinking and lewd conduct)-and physical activity (PA) in urban public parks to inform public policy addressing chronic disease in at-risk populations. Five hundred and twenty-two unique observations were conducted in 22 public parks from March to September 2016. The study utilized the System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC) to document age, gender, ethnicity, and PA level of park users...
January 20, 2018: Preventive Medicine
Janet M Phillips, Ann M Stalter, Sherri Winegardner, Carol Wiggs, Amy Jauch
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: There is a critical need for nurses and interprofessional healthcare providers to implement systems thinking (ST) across international borders, addressing incivility and its perilous effects on patient quality and safety. An estimated one million patients die in hospitals worldwide due to avoidable patient-related errors. Establishing safe and civil workplaces using ST is paramount to promoting clear, level-headed thinking from which patient-centered nursing actions can impact health systems...
January 23, 2018: Nursing Forum
M Hobbs, Mark A Green, C Griffiths, H Jordan, J Saunders, H Grimmer, J McKenna
Public health is increasingly engaging with multi-faceted obesity prevention efforts. Although parks represent key community assets for broader public health, they may not be distributed equitably and associations with obesity are equivocal. We investigated park access and quality relative to deprivation and obesity with individual-level data from the Yorkshire Health Study. Compared to the least deprived areas, the moderately and most deprived areas had a greater park access and park quality in terms of features and amenities...
December 2017: SSM—Population Health
Sara Viotti, Daniela Converso, Lydia E Hamblin, Gloria Guidetti, Judith E Arnetz
AIM: To examine the relationship of co-worker incivility with organisational efficiency, workload and intention to leave in nursing samples from two different countries, the USA and Italy. BACKGROUND: Organisational efficiency has received little attention as a possible correlate of co-worker incivility in the nursing management literature. Studies on co-worker incivility have primarily been carried out in North America and no cross-national studies are available...
January 10, 2018: Journal of Nursing Management
Stephanie L Mayne, Lindsay R Pool, William A Grobman, Kiarri N Kershaw
BACKGROUND: Adverse pregnancy outcomes are associated with higher cardiovascular disease risk among mothers and future health problems of offspring. Neighbourhood crime may contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes by increasing chronic stress, yet the association has been relatively understudied. METHODS: Electronic health records from 34 383 singleton births at a single hospital in Chicago (2009-2013) were geocoded and linked to 1-year rates of police-recorded crime at the neighbourhood (Chicago community area) level...
March 2018: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Julien S Bureau, Marylène Gagné, Alexandre J S Morin, Geneviève A Mageau
This research examines group-level perceptions of transformational leadership (TFL) as negative longitudinal predictors of witnessing person-related (e.g., insults/affronts) and work-related (e.g., negation/intentional work overload) acts of incivility at work. Witnessing workplace incivility was also postulated to negatively predict employee need satisfaction. Data were collected among production employees in different Canadian plants of a major manufacturing company ( N = 344) who worked for 42 different managers ( Mgroup size = 9...
October 1, 2017: Journal of Interpersonal Violence
Changguo Mao, Chu-Hsiang Chang, Russell E Johnson, Jianmin Sun
Drawing from the transactional model of stress, we examined how the social context moderates employees' behavioral responses to workplace incivility. On the basis of data from 384 employees nested in 41 groups, we observed a 3-way, cross-level interaction between individually experienced incivility, group incivility differentiation, and group silence predicting supervisor-rated employee performance, citizenship, and counterproductive behaviors. Specifically, employees' own incivility experiences predicted lower performance and citizenship behavior and higher counterproductive behavior in groups where members received highly different incivility treatment and kept silent...
December 28, 2017: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Allison S Gabriel, Marcus M Butts, Zhenyu Yuan, Rebecca L Rosen, Michael T Sliter
Research conducted on workplace incivility-a low intensity form of deviant behavior-has generally shown that women report higher levels of incivility at work. However, to date, it is unclear as to whether women are primarily treated uncivilly by men (i.e., members of the socially dominant group/out-group) or other women (i.e., members of in-group) in organizations. In light of different theorizing surrounding gender and incivility, we examine whether women experience increased incivility from other women or men, and whether this effect is amplified for women who exhibit higher agency and less communion at work given that these traits and behaviors violate stereotypical gender norms...
December 14, 2017: Journal of Applied Psychology
Joshua K Muliira, Jansi Natarajan, Jacoba van der Colff
BACKGROUND: Incivility in nursing education can adversely affect the academic environment, the learning outcomes, and safety. Nursing faculty (NF) and nursing students (NS) contribute to the academic incivility. Little is known about the extent of NF academic incivility in the Middle East region. This study aimed at exploring the perceptions and extent of NF academic incivility in an undergraduate nursing program of a public university in Oman. METHODS: A cross sectional survey was used to collect data from 155 undergraduate NS and 40 NF about faculty academic incivility...
December 13, 2017: BMC Medical Education
Gwenda Smith Phillips, Carol Isaac MacKusick, Ramona Whichello
A literature review was conducted to evaluate existing knowledge of incivility in the nursing workplace through the lens of nursing ethics and spirituality. Study articles presented a consistent theme of improved organizational commitment and job satisfaction when spirituality was injected into the workplace. It seems plausible to suggest a positive correlation between spirituality and more civil environments in nursing workplaces.
January 2018: Journal of Christian Nursing: a Quarterly Publication of Nurses Christian Fellowship
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"