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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28104188/maternal-multiple-micronutrient-supplementation-and-other-biomedical-and-socioenvironmental-influences-on-children-s-cognition-at-age-9-12-years-in-indonesia-follow-up-of-the-summit-randomised-trial
#1
Elizabeth L Prado, Susy K Sebayang, Mandri Apriatni, Siti R Adawiyah, Nina Hidayati, Ayuniarti Islamiyah, Sudirman Siddiq, Benyamin Harefa, Jarrad Lum, Katherine J Alcock, Michael T Ullman, Husni Muadz, Anuraj H Shankar
BACKGROUND: Brain and cognitive development during the first 1000 days from conception are affected by multiple biomedical and socioenvironmental determinants including nutrition, health, nurturing, and stimulation. An improved understanding of the long-term influence of these factors is needed to prioritise public health investments to optimise human development. METHODS: We did a follow-up study of the Supplementation with Multiple Micronutrients Intervention Trial (SUMMIT), a double-blind, cluster-randomised trial of maternal supplementation with multiple micronutrients (MMN) or iron and folic acid (IFA) in Indonesia...
February 2017: Lancet Global Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28087242/brains-for-birds-and-babies-neural-parallels-between-birdsong-and-speech-acquisition
#2
REVIEW
Jonathan Prather, Kazuo Okanoya, Johan J Bolhuis
Language as a computational cognitive mechanism appears to be unique to the human species. However, there are remarkable behavioral similarities between song learning in songbirds and speech acquisition in human infants that are absent in non-human primates. Here we review important neural parallels between birdsong and speech. In both cases there are separate but continually interacting neural networks that underlie vocal production, sensorimotor learning, and auditory perception and memory. As in the case of human speech, neural activity related to birdsong learning is lateralized, and mirror neurons linking perception and performance may contribute to sensorimotor learning...
January 10, 2017: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28081026/the-effect-of-nebulized-glycopyrrolate-on-posterior-drooling-in-patients-with-brain-injury-two-cases-of-different-brain-lesions
#3
Zee-Ihn Lee, Kwang Jae Yu, Dae Hee Lee, Seong Kyung Hong, Seung Beom Woo, Jong Min Kim, Donghwi Park
Posterior drooling, which can lead to substantial respiratory morbidity, including unexplained lung diseases and recurrent pneumonia, is an important issue in the rehabilitation unit. There are various treatment options for posterior drooling, including pharmacologic therapy, oral motor or behavioral therapy, biofeedback, local glandular injection of botulinum toxin, irradiation, and surgery. Among them, nebulized glycopyrrolate has the following advantages: It is noninvasive and is relatively free of central adverse effects because it does not cross the blood-brain barrier unlike other anticholinergics...
January 9, 2017: American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28062175/intranasal-c3a-treatment-ameliorates-cognitive-impairment-in-a-mouse-model-of-neonatal-hypoxic-ischemic-brain-injury
#4
Javier Morán, Anna Stokowska, Frederik R Walker, Carina Mallard, Henrik Hagberg, Marcela Pekna
Perinatal asphyxia-induced brain injury is often associated with irreversible neurological complications such as intellectual disability and cerebral palsy but available therapies are limited. Novel neuroprotective therapies as well as approaches stimulating neural plasticity mechanism that can compensate for cell death after hypoxia-ischemia (HI) are urgently needed. We previously reported that single i.c.v. injection of complement-derived peptide C3a 1h after HI induction prevented HI-induced cognitive impairment when mice were tested as adults...
January 4, 2017: Experimental Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28059709/microstructure-of-the-default-mode-network-in-preterm-infants
#5
J Cui, O Tymofiyeva, R Desikan, T Flynn, H Kim, D Gano, C P Hess, D M Ferriero, A J Barkovich, D Xu
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Diffusion and fMRI has been providing insights to brain development in addition to anatomic imaging. This study aimed to evaluate the microstructure of white matter tracts underlying the default mode network in premature infants by using resting-state functional MR imaging in conjunction with diffusion tensor imaging-based tractography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cohort of 44 preterm infants underwent structural T1-weighted imaging, resting-state fMRI, and DTI at 3T, including 21 infants with brain injuries and 23 infants with normal-appearing structural imaging as controls...
November 10, 2016: AJNR. American Journal of Neuroradiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28042822/enduring-sexually-dimorphic-impact-of-in-utero-exposure-to-elevated-levels-of-glucocorticoids-on-midbrain-dopaminergic-populations
#6
REVIEW
Glenda E Gillies, Kanwar Virdee, Ilse Pienaar, Felwah Al-Zaid, Jeffrey W Dalley
Glucocorticoid hormones (GCs) released from the fetal/maternal glands during late gestation are required for normal development of mammalian organs and tissues. Accordingly, synthetic glucocorticoids have proven to be invaluable in perinatal medicine where they are widely used to accelerate fetal lung maturation when there is risk of pre-term birth and to promote infant survival. However, clinical and pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that inappropriate exposure of the developing brain to elevated levels of GCs, either as a result of clinical over-use or after stress-induced activation of the fetal/maternal adrenal cortex, is linked with significant effects on brain structure, neurological function and behaviour in later life...
December 30, 2016: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28017265/cortical-specialisation-to-social-stimuli-from-the-first-days-to-the-second-year-of-life-a-rural-gambian-cohort
#7
S Lloyd-Fox, K Begus, D Halliday, L Pirazzoli, A Blasi, M Papademetriou, M K Darboe, A M Prentice, M H Johnson, S E Moore, C E Elwell
Brain and nervous system development in human infants during the first 1000days (conception to two years of age) is critical, and compromised development during this time (such as from under nutrition or poverty) can have life-long effects on physical growth and cognitive function. Cortical mapping of cognitive function during infancy is poorly understood in resource-poor settings due to the lack of transportable and low-cost neuroimaging methods. Having established a signature cortical response to social versus non-social visual and auditory stimuli in infants from 4 to 6 months of age in the UK, here we apply this functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) paradigm to investigate social responses in infants from the first postnatal days to the second year of life in two contrasting environments: rural Gambian and urban UK...
November 27, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28011793/protecting-the-premature-brain-current-evidence-based-strategies-for-minimising-perinatal-brain-injury-in-preterm-infants
#8
Charlotte L Lea, Adam Smith-Collins, Karen Luyt
Improving neurodevelopmental outcome for preterm infants is an important challenge for neonatal medicine. The disruption of normal brain growth and neurological development is a significant consequence of preterm birth and can result in physical and cognitive impairments. While advances in neonatal medicine have led to progressively better survival rates for preterm infants, there has only been a modest improvement in the proportion of surviving infants without neurological impairment, and no change in the proportion with severe disability...
December 23, 2016: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28011082/-neonatal-arterial-ischemic-stroke-review-of-the-current-guidelines
#9
E Saliba, T Debillon, S Auvin, O Baud, V Biran, J-L Chabernaud, S Chabrier, F Cneude, A-G Cordier, V Darmency-Stamboul, J-F Diependaele, T Debillon, M Dinomais, C Durand, A Ego, G Favrais, Y Gruel, L Hertz-Pannier, B Husson, S Marret, S N'Guyen The Tich, T Perez, E Saliba, J-B Valentin, C Vuillerot
Neonatal arterial ischemic stroke (NAIS) is a rare event that occurs in approximately one in 5000 term or close-to-term infants. Most affected infants will present with seizures. Although a well-recognized clinical entity, many questions remain regarding diagnosis, risk factors, treatment, and follow-up modalities. In the absence of a known pathophysiological mechanism and lack of evidence-based guidelines, only supportive care is currently provided. To address these issues, a French national committee set up by the French Neonatal Society (Société française de néonatologie) and the national referral center (Centre national de référence) for arterial ischemic stroke in children drew up guidelines based on an HAS (Haute Autorité de santé [HAS]; French national authority for health) methodology...
December 20, 2016: Archives de Pédiatrie: Organe Officiel de la Sociéte Française de Pédiatrie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28008304/structural-brain-network-reorganization-and-social-cognition-related-to-adverse-perinatal-condition-from-infancy-to-early-adolescence
#10
Emma Muñoz-Moreno, Elda Fischi-Gomez, Dafnis Batalle, Cristina Borradori-Tolsa, Elisenda Eixarch, Jean-Philippe Thiran, Eduard Gratacós, Petra S Hüppi
Adverse conditions during fetal life have been associated to both structural and functional changes in neurodevelopment from the neonatal period to adolescence. In this study, connectomics was used to assess the evolution of brain networks from infancy to early adolescence. Brain network reorganization over time in subjects who had suffered adverse perinatal conditions is characterized and related to neurodevelopment and cognition. Three cohorts of prematurely born infants and children (between 28 and 35 weeks of gestational age), including individuals with a birth weight appropriated for gestational age and with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), were evaluated at 1, 6, and 10 years of age, respectively...
2016: Frontiers in Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27976377/association-between-corpus-callosum-development-on-magnetic-resonance-imaging-and-diffusion-tensor-imaging-and-neurodevelopmental-outcome-in-neonates-born-very-preterm
#11
Anna M Malavolti, Vann Chau, Meisan Brown-Lum, Kenneth J Poskitt, Rollin Brant, Anne Synnes, Ruth E Grunau, Steven P Miller
AIM: To characterize corpus callosum development in neonates born very preterm from early in life to term-equivalent age and its relationship with neurodevelopmental outcome at 18 months corrected age. METHOD: In a prospective cohort of 193 neonates born preterm, 24 to 32 weeks' gestation, we used magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging acquired early in life (n=193) and at term-equivalent age (n=159) to measure corpus callosum development: mid-sagittal area (including corpus callosum subdivisions) and length, and fractional anisotropy from the genu and splenium...
December 14, 2016: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27940690/developmental-outcomes-of-preterm-infants-with-neonatal-hypoglycemia
#12
Rachel H Goode, Mallikarjuna Rettiganti, Jingyun Li, Robert E Lyle, Leanne Whiteside-Mansell, Kathleen W Barrett, Patrick H Casey
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Neonatal hypoglycemia has been associated with abnormalities on brain imaging and a spectrum of developmental delays, although historical and recent studies show conflicting results. We compared the cognitive, academic, and behavioral outcomes of preterm infants with neonatal hypoglycemia with those of normoglycemic controls at 3 to 18 years of age. METHODS: A secondary analysis of data from the Infant Health and Development Program, a national, multisite, randomized controlled longitudinal intervention study of long-term health and developmental outcomes in preterm infants...
December 2016: Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27906505/what-do-we-learn-about-development-from-baby-robots
#13
REVIEW
Pierre-Yves Oudeyer
Understanding infant development is one of the great scientific challenges of contemporary science. In addressing this challenge, robots have proven useful as they allow experimenters to model the developing brain and body and understand the processes by which new patterns emerge in sensorimotor, cognitive, and social domains. Robotics also complements traditional experimental methods in psychology and neuroscience, where only a few variables can be studied at the same time. Moreover, work with robots has enabled researchers to systematically explore the role of the body in shaping the development of skill...
January 2017: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews. Cognitive Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27906503/neurodevelopmental-disorders
#14
REVIEW
Hana D'Souza, Annette Karmiloff-Smith
Recent technological advances allow us to measure how the infant brain functions in ways that were not possible just a decade ago. Although methodological advances are exciting, we must also consider how theories guide research: what we look for and how we explain what we find. Indeed, the ways in which research findings are interpreted affects the design of policies, educational practices, and interventions. Thus, the theoretical approaches adopted by scientists have a real impact on the lives of children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) and their families, as well as on the wider community...
January 2017: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews. Cognitive Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27899304/caffeine-for-apnea-of-prematurity-effects-on-the-developing-brain
#15
REVIEW
Anzari Atik, Richard Harding, Robert De Matteo, Delphi Kondos-Devcic, Jeanie Cheong, Lex W Doyle, Mary Tolcos
Caffeine is a methylxanthine that is widely used to treat apnea of prematurity (AOP). In preterm infants, caffeine reduces the duration of respiratory support, improves survival rates and lowers the incidence of cerebral palsy and cognitive delay. There is, however, little evidence relating to the immediate and long-term effects of caffeine on brain development, especially at the cellular and molecular levels. Experimental data are conflicting, with studies showing that caffeine can have either adverse or benefical effects in the developing brain...
November 27, 2016: Neurotoxicology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27884462/dual-neural-network-model-for-the-evolution-of-speech-and-language
#16
REVIEW
Steffen R Hage, Andreas Nieder
Explaining the evolution of speech and language poses one of the biggest challenges in biology. We propose a dual network model that posits a volitional articulatory motor network (VAMN) originating in the prefrontal cortex (PFC; including Broca's area) that cognitively controls vocal output of a phylogenetically conserved primary vocal motor network (PVMN) situated in subcortical structures. By comparing the connections between these two systems in human and nonhuman primate brains, we identify crucial biological preadaptations in monkeys for the emergence of a language system in humans...
December 2016: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27870403/sex-differences-in-social-cognition-the-case-of-face-processing
#17
Alice Mado Proverbio
Several studies have demonstrated that women show a greater interest for social information and empathic attitude than men. This article reviews studies on sex differences in the brain, with particular reference to how males and females process faces and facial expressions, social interactions, pain of others, infant faces, faces in things (pareidolia phenomenon), opposite-sex faces, humans vs. landscapes, incongruent behavior, motor actions, biological motion, erotic pictures, and emotional information. Sex differences in oxytocin-based attachment response and emotional memory are also mentioned...
January 2, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863706/advanced-neuroimaging-and-its-role-in-predicting-neurodevelopmental-outcomes-in-very-preterm-infants
#18
REVIEW
Nehal A Parikh
Up to 35% of very preterm infants survive with neurodevelopmental impairments (NDI) such as cognitive deficits, cerebral palsy, and attention deficit disorder. Advanced MRI quantitative tools such as brain morphometry, diffusion MRI, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and functional MRI at term-equivalent age are ideally suited to improve current efforts to predict later development of disabilities. This would facilitate application of targeted early intervention therapies during the first few years of life when neuroplasticity is optimal...
December 2016: Seminars in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27845541/how-the-baby-learns-to-see-donald-o-hebb-award-lecture-canadian-society-for-brain-behaviour-and-cognitive-science-ottawa-june-2015
#19
Daphne Maurer
Hebb's (1949) book The Organisation of Behaviour presented a novel hypothesis about how the baby learns to see. This article summarizes the results of my research program that evaluated Hebb's hypothesis: first, by studying infants' eye movements and initial perceptual abilities and second, by studying the effect of visual deprivation (e.g., congenital cataracts) on later perceptual development. Collectively, the results support Hebb's hypothesis that the baby does indeed learn to see. Early visual experience not only drives the baby's initial scanning of objects, but also sets up the neural architecture that will come to underlie adults' perception...
September 2016: Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology, Revue Canadienne de Psychologie Expérimentale
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27812690/characterizing-the-pattern-of-anomalies-in-congenital-zika-syndrome-for-pediatric-clinicians
#20
Cynthia A Moore, J Erin Staples, William B Dobyns, André Pessoa, Camila V Ventura, Eduardo Borges da Fonseca, Erlane Marques Ribeiro, Liana O Ventura, Norberto Nogueira Neto, J Fernando Arena, Sonja A Rasmussen
Importance: Zika virus infection can be prenatally passed from a pregnant woman to her fetus. There is sufficient evidence to conclude that intrauterine Zika virus infection is a cause of microcephaly and serious brain anomalies, but the full spectrum of anomalies has not been delineated. To inform pediatric clinicians who may be called on to evaluate and treat affected infants and children, we review the most recent evidence to better characterize congenital Zika syndrome. Observations: We reviewed published reports of congenital anomalies occurring in fetuses or infants with presumed or laboratory-confirmed intrauterine Zika virus infection...
November 3, 2016: JAMA Pediatrics
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