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Bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28320216/a-neurologic-dysfunction-scoring-protocol-for-jaundiced-neonates-requiring-exchange-transfusion
#1
Bolajoko O Olusanya, Folashade B Osibanjo, Adeniyi A Ajiboye, Oluwafemi E Ayodele, Adebanke A Odunsi, Serah M Olaifa, Abieyuwa A Emokpae
AIM: To evaluate the performance of a neurologic assessment protocol among jaundiced infants requiring exchange transfusion (ET). METHODS: We identified infants in a referral children's hospital who received ET and those who met the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) criteria for ET based on total serum bilirubin (TSB) levels. The performance of a bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction (BIND-M) scoring protocol for acute bilirubin encephalopathy (ABE) in detecting infants treated with ET in both groups was investigated by logistic regression analysis and c-statistic...
March 20, 2017: Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28283555/developmental-genetic-dietary-and-xenobiotic-influences-on-neonatal-hyperbilirubinemia
#2
REVIEW
Mei-Fei Yueh, Shujuan Chen, Nghia Nguyen, Robert H Tukey
Hyperbilirubinemia, caused by the accumulation of unconjugated bilirubin, is one of the most common clinical diagnoses in both premature and term newborns. Owing to the fact that bilirubin is metabolized solely through glucuronidation by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1, it is now known that immaturity of UGT1A1, in combination with the overproduction of bilirubin during the developmental stage, acts as a bottleneck to bilirubin elimination and predisposes the infant to high total serum bilirubin levels...
May 2017: Molecular Pharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28131490/prediction-of-3-to-5-month-outcomes-from-signs-of-acute-bilirubin-toxicity-in-newborn-infants
#3
Salma Z El Houchi, Iman Iskander, Rasha Gamaleldin, Amira El Shenawy, Iman Seoud, Hazem Abou-Youssef, Richard P Wennberg
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the ability of the bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction (BIND) score to predict residual neurologic and auditory disability and to document the relationship of BIND score to total serum bilirubin (TSB) concentration. STUDY DESIGN: The BIND score (assessing mental status, muscle tone, and cry patterns) was obtained serially at 6- to 8-hour intervals in 220 near-term and full-term infants with severe hyperbilirubinemia. Neurologic and/or auditory outcomes at 3-5 months of age were correlated with the highest calculated BIND score...
April 2017: Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28036021/monitoring-the-response-of-hyperbilirubinemia-in-the-mouse-brain-by-in-vivo-bioluminescence-imaging
#4
Isabella Manni, Giuliana Di Rocco, Salvatore Fusco, Lucia Leone, Saviana Antonella Barbati, Carmine Maria Carapella, Claudio Grassi, Giulia Piaggio, Gabriele Toietta
Increased levels of unconjugated bilirubin are neurotoxic, but the mechanism leading to neurological damage has not been completely elucidated. Innovative strategies of investigation are needed to more precisely define this pathological process. By longitudinal in vivo bioluminescence imaging, we noninvasively visualized the brain response to hyperbilirubinemia in the MITO-Luc mouse, in which light emission is restricted to the regions of active cell proliferation. We assessed that acute hyperbilirubinemia promotes bioluminescence in the brain region, indicating an increment in the cell proliferation rate...
December 28, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27591005/bilirubin-induced-neurological-dysfunction-a-clinico-radiological-neurophysiological-correlation-in-30-consecutive-children
#5
Ronald van Toorn, Philip Brink, Johan Smith, Christelle Ackermann, Regan Solomons
The clinical expression of bilirubin-induced neurological dysfunction varies according to severity and location of the disease. Definitions have been proposed to describe different bilirubin-induced neurological dysfunction subtypes. Our objective was to describe the severity and clinico-radiological-neurophysiological correlation in 30 consecutive children with bilirubin-induced neurological dysfunction seen over a period of 5 years. Thirty children exposed to acute neonatal bilirubin encephalopathy were included in the study...
December 2016: Journal of Child Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27268733/a-neurotoxic-alcohol-exposure-paradigm-does-not-induce-hepatic-encephalopathy
#6
Joel G Hashimoto, Kristine M Wiren, Clare J Wilhelm
Alcohol abuse is associated with neurological dysfunction, brain morphological deficits and frank neurotoxicity. Although these disruptions may be a secondary effect due to hepatic encephalopathy, no clear evidence of causality is available. This study examined whether a 72h period of alcohol intoxication known to induce physical dependence, followed by a single withdrawal, was sufficient to induce signs of hepatic encephalopathy in male and female mice. Animals were continuously intoxicated via alcohol vapor inhalation, a procedure previously shown to induce significant neurotoxicity in female mice...
July 2016: Neurotoxicology and Teratology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27235203/hyperbilirubinemia-in-preterm-neonates
#7
REVIEW
Vinod K Bhutani, Ronald J Wong, David K Stevenson
Preterm neonates with increased bilirubin production loads are more likely to sustain adverse outcomes due to either neurotoxicity or overtreatment with phototherapy and/or exchange transfusion. Clinicians should rely on expert consensus opinions to guide timely and effective interventions until there is better evidence to refine bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction or benefits of bilirubin. In this article, we review the evolving evidence for bilirubin-induced brain injury in preterm infants and highlight the clinical approaches that minimize the risk of bilirubin neurotoxicity...
June 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26818600/efficacy-of-human-adipose-tissue-derived-stem-cells-on-neonatal-bilirubin-encephalopathy-in-rats
#8
Naser Amini, Nasim Vousooghi, Mahmoudreza Hadjighassem, Mehrdad Bakhtiyari, Neda Mousavi, Hosein Safakheil, Leila Jafari, Arash Sarveazad, Abazar Yari, Sara Ramezani, Faezeh Faghihi, Mohammad Taghi Joghataei
Kernicterus is a neurological syndrome associated with indirect bilirubin accumulation and damages to the basal ganglia, cerebellum and brain stem nuclei particularly the cochlear nucleus. To mimic haemolysis in a rat model such that it was similar to what is observed in a preterm human, we injected phenylhydrazine in 7-day-old rats to induce haemolysis and then infused sulfisoxazole into the same rats at day 9 to block bilirubin binding sites in the albumin. We have investigated the effectiveness of human adiposity-derived stem cells as a therapeutic paradigm for perinatal neuronal repair in a kernicterus animal model...
May 2016: Neurotoxicity Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26009624/a-pediatrician-s-practical-guide-to-diagnosing-and-treating-hereditary-spherocytosis-in-neonates
#9
REVIEW
Robert D Christensen, Hassan M Yaish, Patrick G Gallagher
Newborn infants who have hereditary spherocytosis (HS) can develop anemia and hyperbilirubinemia. Bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction is less likely in these neonates if the diagnosis of HS is recognized and appropriate treatment provided. Among neonates listed in the USA Kernicterus Registry, HS was the third most common underlying hemolytic condition after glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and ABO hemolytic disease. HS is the leading cause of direct antiglobulin test (direct Coombs) negative hemolytic anemia requiring erythrocyte transfusion in the first months of life...
June 2015: Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25884679/management-of-late-preterm-and-term-infants-with-hyperbilirubinaemia-in-resource-constrained-settings
#10
Bolajoko O Olusanya, Tinuade A Ogunlesi, Praveen Kumar, Nem-Yun Boo, Iman F Iskander, Maria Fernanda B de Almeida, Yvonne E Vaucher, Tina M Slusher
Hyperbilirubinaemia is a ubiquitous transitional morbidity in the vast majority of newborns and a leading cause of hospitalisation in the first week of life worldwide. While timely and effective phototherapy and exchange transfusion are well proven treatments for severe neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia, inappropriate or ineffective treatment of hyperbilirubinaemia, at secondary and tertiary hospitals, still prevails in many poorly-resourced countries accounting for a disproportionately high burden of bilirubin-induced mortality and long-term morbidity...
April 12, 2015: BMC Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25884571/a-modified-bilirubin-induced-neurologic-dysfunction-bind-m-algorithm-is-useful-in-evaluating-severity-of-jaundice-in-a-resource-limited-setting
#11
Paula G Radmacher, Frank D Groves, Joshua A Owa, Gabriel E Ofovwe, Emmanuel A Amuabunos, Bolajoko O Olusanya, Tina M Slusher
BACKGROUND: Severe neonatal jaundice with associated acute bilirubin encephalopathy occurs frequently in low- and middle-income countries, where advanced diagnostic technology is in short supply. In an effort to facilitate the physical diagnosis of acute bilirubin encephalopathy, we pilot-tested a modified bilirubin induced neurologic dysfunction scoring algorithm in a group of pediatric trainees (residents) and their mentors (consultants) in a resource-constrained setting. METHODS: Jaundiced Nigerian infants were examined by consultant and resident pediatricians...
April 1, 2015: BMC Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25675342/risk-factors-for-severe-neonatal-hyperbilirubinemia-in-low-and-middle-income-countries-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#12
REVIEW
Bolajoko O Olusanya, Folasade B Osibanjo, Tina M Slusher
BACKGROUND: Available evidence suggests that low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) bear the greatest burden of severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia characterized by disproportionately high rates of morbidity, mortality and neurodevelopmental disorders compared to high-income countries. We set out to identify the risk factors that contribute to the burden of severe hyperbilirubinemia in the most developmentally disadvantaged LMICs to highlight areas for action and further research. METHODS: We systematically searched PubMed, Scopus, Ovid EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), WHO Library Database (WHOLIS), African Index Medicus (AIM), African Journals Online (AJOL), LILACS, and IndMed for reports published between January 1990 and June 2014...
2015: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25585889/impact-of-bilirubin-induced-neurologic-dysfunction-on-neurodevelopmental-outcomes
#13
REVIEW
Courtney J Wusthoff, Irene M Loe
Bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction (BIND) is the constellation of neurologic sequelae following milder degrees of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia than are associated with kernicterus. Clinically, BIND may manifest after the neonatal period as developmental delay, cognitive impairment, disordered executive function, and behavioral and psychiatric disorders. However, there is controversy regarding the relative contribution of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia versus other risk factors to the development of later neurodevelopmental disorders in children with BIND...
February 2015: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25582277/impact-of-rhesus-disease-on-the-global-problem-of-bilirubin-induced-neurologic-dysfunction
#14
REVIEW
Alvin Zipursky, Vinod K Bhutani
Clinical experience with Rhesus (Rh) disease and its post-icteric sequelae is limited among high-income countries because of nearly over four decades of effective prevention care. We hypothesized that Rh disease is prevalent in other regions of the world because it is likely that protection is limited or non-existent. Following a worldwide study, it has been concluded that Rh hemolytic disease is a significant public health problem resulting in stillbirths and neonatal deaths, and is a major cause of severe hyperbilirubinemia with its sequelae, kernicterus and bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction...
February 2015: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25577656/bilirubin-induced-neurologic-dysfunction-bind
#15
EDITORIAL
Vinod K Bhutani, Ronald Wong
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2015: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25577655/visuocortical-bilirubin-induced-neurological-dysfunction
#16
REVIEW
William V Good, Chuan Hou
This review addresses the question whether elevated levels of total serum/plasma bilirubin (TB) cause measurable neurological effects, specifically to visuocortical functioning. Past research in the area of vision and its relation to jaundice has taken advantage of flash visual-evoked potentials (VEPs). Using a steady state VEP, we developed preliminary data suggesting that children who had jaundice with TB levels between 10 and 25mg/dL, but who did not have kernicterus, have measurable changes in visual function, when compared to control infants who did not have jaundice...
February 2015: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25577653/the-clinical-syndrome-of-bilirubin-induced-neurologic-dysfunction
#17
REVIEW
Vinod K Bhutani, Lois Johnson-Hamerman
Clinicians have hypothesized a spectrum of minor neurologic manifestations, consistent with neuroanatomical reports and collectively termed as a "syndrome of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction (BIND)," which can occur in the absence of classical kernicterus. The current review builds on these initial reports with a focus on clinical signs and symptoms that are assessed by standardized tools and manifest from neonatal age to childhood. These clinical manifestations are characterized by the following domains: (i) neuromotor signs; (ii) muscle tone abnormalities; (iii) hyperexcitable neonatal reflexes; (iv) variety of neurobehavior manifestations; (v) speech and language abnormalities; and (vi) evolving array of central processing abnormalities, such as sensorineural audiology and visuomotor dysfunctions...
February 2015: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25573775/societal-impact-of-bilirubin-induced-hearing-impairment-in-resource-limited-nations
#18
REVIEW
Bolajoko O Olusanya
Infants with bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction (BIND) are characterized by several developmental disabilities including auditory impairments. This paper explores the societal impact of bilirubin-induced auditory impairments, inclusive of hearing impairments and auditory neuropathy spectrum disorders, on these infants, their families, and on the community in resource-limited countries (per capita income of US$6,000 or less). Auditory impairments have substantial emotional, social, and economic impact on the affected infants, their families and communities...
February 2015: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25560401/neonatal-hemolysis-and-risk-of-bilirubin-induced-neurologic-dysfunction
#19
REVIEW
Ronald J Wong, David K Stevenson
The pathologic phenotype of severe hyperbilirubinemia in the newborn infant is primarily due to excessive bilirubin production and/or impaired conjugation, resulting in an increased bilirubin load. This may, in turn, increase an infant's risk for the development of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction (BIND). The highest-risk infants are those with increased bilirubin production rates due to hemolysis. Several immune and non-immune conditions have been found to cause severe hemolysis, and these are often exacerbated in those infants with perinatal sepsis and genetic predispositions...
February 2015: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25547431/are-the-neuromotor-disabilities-of-bilirubin-induced-neurologic-dysfunction-disorders-related-to-the-cerebellum-and-its-connections
#20
REVIEW
Jon F Watchko, Michael J Painter, Ashok Panigrahy
Investigators have hypothesized a range of subcortical neuropathology in the genesis of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction (BIND). The current review builds on this speculation with a specific focus on the cerebellum and its connections in the development of the subtle neuromotor disabilities of BIND. The focus on the cerebellum derives from the following observations: (i) the cerebellum is vulnerable to bilirubin-induced injury; perhaps the most vulnerable region within the central nervous system; (ii) infants with cerebellar injury exhibit a neuromotor phenotype similar to BIND; and (iii) the cerebellum has extensive bidirectional circuitry projections to motor and non-motor regions of the brainstem and cerebral cortex that impact a variety of neurobehaviors...
February 2015: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
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