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cochlear hair cell

Nils Kristian Prenzler, Eva Bültmann, Alexandros Giourgas, Melanie Steffens, Rolf Benedikt Salcher, Stefan Stolle, Anke Lesinski-Schiedat, Thomas Lenarz, Martin Durisin
The exact pathomechanism of deafening in Meniere's disease (MD) is still unknown; intoxication of hair cells and neural damage from endolymphatic hydrops is discussed. In the literature, there are only a few reports on hearing outcome of MD patients after treatment with cochlear implantation (CI) whereby especially the comparison of MD vs. non-MD patients with CI differs. In this retrospective study, results in speech understanding [Freiburger Einsilber (FES65) and Hochmair-Schulz-Moser test in quiet (HSM) and in noise (HSM + 10 dB)] of 27 implanted MD patients were collected and compared to a matched standard CI cohort...
October 25, 2016: European Archives of Oto-rhino-laryngology
Habiba O Usman, Carey D Balaban
BACKGROUND: Evidence of serotonergic involvement in vestibular pathway contributions to migraine and balance disorders is compelling. Serotonergic 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors are expressed extensively in inner ear ganglia of monkeys and rats. The serotonergic 5-HT1F receptor is also a target of triptans. This study describes its distribution in vestibular and trigeminal ganglia of monkeys. METHODS: Using primary polyclonal antibodies raised against oligopeptides specific for the human 5-HT1F receptor, neuronal somatic area and intensity of immunoreactive vestibular and trigeminal ganglia were quantified...
2016: Frontiers in Neurology
A R Fetoni, R Rolesi, F Paciello, S L M Eramo, C Grassi, D Troiani, G Paludetti
Experimental and human investigations have raised the level of concern about the potential ototoxicity of organic solvents and their interaction with noise. The main objective of this study was to characterize the effects of the combined noise and styrene exposure on hearing focusing on the mechanism of damage on the sensorineural cells and supporting cells of the organ of Corti and neurons of the ganglion of Corti. The impact of single and combined exposures on hearing was evaluated by auditory functional testing and histological analyses of cochlear specimens...
October 18, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
J Y Wang, Y Xia, C C Yang, Z Wang
Objective: To analysis the important genes and functions of cochlear hair cells with oxidative stress injury, by the construction of gene regulatory network which based on different miRNA in cochlear hair cells in vitro with oxidative stress injury, and to explore the molecular mechanisms of deafness based on oxidative stress injury. Method: The oxidative stress damage cochlear hair cell model was induced by 200 μmol/L t-BHP exposure in vitro. Small RNA deep sequencing analyzed the difference expression of miRNA and contructed gene regulatory network by 6 most significant difference miRNA...
October 7, 2016: Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke za Zhi, Chinese Journal of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery
Qiuhong Xue, Caihong Li, Jia Chen, Hongmei Guo, Dongqing Li, Xianglei Wu
CONTEXT: The audiological features and cochlear morphology of individuals with noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) are well characterized. However, the molecular processes in the cochlea are not well understood. AIMS: To explore the role of the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) response in the guinea pig model of cochlear damage induced by exposure to intense noise. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A pilot case-control study. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Forty-eight guinea pigs were divided into four equal groups...
September 2016: Noise & Health
Lena Jeanson, Lutz Wiegrebe, Robert Gürkov, Eike Krause, Markus Drexl
The presentation of intense, low-frequency (LF) sound to the human ear can cause very slow, sinusoidal oscillations of cochlear sensitivity after LF sound offset, coined the "Bounce" phenomenon. Changes in level and frequency of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) are a sensitive measure of the Bounce. Here, we investigated the effect of LF sound level and frequency on the Bounce. Specifically, the level of SOAEs was tracked for minutes before and after a 90-s LF sound exposure. Trials were carried out with several LF sound levels (93 to 108 dB SPL corresponding to 47 to 75 phons at a fixed frequency of 30 Hz) and different LF sound frequencies (30, 60, 120, 240 and 480 Hz at a fixed loudness level of 80 phons)...
October 19, 2016: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
Wei Dong, Elizabeth S Olson
Cochlear frequency tuning is based on a mildly tuned traveling-wave response that is enhanced in amplitude and sharpness by outer hair cell (OHC)-based forces. The nonlinear and active character of this enhancement is the fundamental manifestation of cochlear amplification. Recently, mechanical (pressure) and electrical (extracellular OHC-generated voltage) responses were simultaneously measured close to the sensory tissue's basilar membrane. Both pressure and voltage were tuned and showed traveling-wave phase accumulation, evidence that they were locally generated responses...
October 18, 2016: Biophysical Journal
Nathaniel T Greene, Jameson K Mattingly, Renee M Banakis Hartl, Daniel J Tollin, Stephen P Cass
HYPOTHESIS: Cochlear implant (CI) electrode insertion into the round window induces pressure transients in the cochlear fluid comparable to high-intensity sound transients. BACKGROUND: Many patients receiving a CI have some remaining functional hearing at low frequencies; thus, devices and surgical techniques have been developed to use this residual hearing. To maintain functional acoustic hearing, it is important to retain function of any hair cells and auditory nerve fibers innervating the basilar membrane; however, in a subset of patients, residual low-frequency hearing is lost after CI insertion...
October 5, 2016: Otology & Neurotology
William C Scott, Christopher K Giardina, Andrew K Pappa, Tatyana E Fontenot, Meredith L Anderson, Margaret T Dillon, Kevin D Brown, Harold C Pillsbury, Oliver F Adunka, Craig A Buchman, Douglas C Fitzpatrick
HYPOTHESIS: The compound action potential (CAP) is a purely neural component of the cochlea's response to sound, and may provide information regarding the existing neural substrate in cochlear implant (CI) subjects that can help account for variance in speech perception outcomes. BACKGROUND: Measurement of the "total response" (TR), or sum of the magnitudes of spectral components in the ongoing responses to tone bursts across frequencies, has been shown to account for 40 to 50% of variance in speech perception outcomes...
October 4, 2016: Otology & Neurotology
Tengku Siti Hajar Haryuna, Wibi Riawan, Ardyansyah Nasution, Suprapto Ma'at, Juliandi Harahap, Indri Adriztina
Introduction The structural changes underlying permanent noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) include loss of the sensory hair cells, damage to their stereocilia, and supporting tissues within the cochlear lateral wall. Objective The objective of this study is to demonstrate curcumin as a safe and effective therapeutic agent in the prevention and treatment for fibroblasts damage within the cochlear supporting tissues and lateral wall through cell death pathway. Methods We divided 24 Rattus norvegicus into 4 groups, Group 1: control; Group 2: noise (+); Group 3: noise (+), 50 mg/day curcumin (+); Group 4: noise (+), 100 mg/day curcumin (+)...
October 2016: International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology
Sedat Doğan, Hasmet Yazici, Esin Yalçinkaya, Halil Ibrahim Erdoğdu, Sibel Alicura Tokgöz, Furkan Sarici, Mehmet Namuslu, Yasin Sarikaya
Cisplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of several types of malignant solid tumors but its clinical use is associated with ototoxicity. In the present study, we investigated the effect of selenium administration on lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde [MDA]) and cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in rats. Healthy wistar albino rats (n = 21) were randomly divided into 3 groups: control (C), cisplatin (Cis), cisplatin and selenium (Cis+Se). Cisplatin was administered for 3 days to Cis and Cis+Se groups...
October 2016: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
Lijuan Shi, Ying Chang, Xiaowei Li, Steve Aiken, Lijie Liu, Jian Wang
Recent studies on animal models have shown that noise exposure that does not lead to permanent threshold shift (PTS) can cause considerable damage around the synapses between inner hair cells (IHCs) and type-I afferent auditory nerve fibers (ANFs). Disruption of these synapses not only disables the innervated ANFs but also results in the slow degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons if the synapses are not reestablished. Such a loss of ANFs should result in signal coding deficits, which are exacerbated by the bias of the damage toward synapses connecting low-spontaneous-rate (SR) ANFs, which are known to be vital for signal coding in noisy background...
2016: Neural Plasticity
Jingjing Sherry Wu, Eric D Young, Elisabeth Glowatzki
: Auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) exhibit a range of spontaneous firing rates (SRs) that are inversely correlated with threshold for sounds. To probe the underlying mechanisms and time course of SR differentiation during cochlear maturation, loose-patch extracellular recordings were made from ANF dendrites using acutely excised rat cochlear preparations of different ages after hearing onset. Diversification of SRs occurred mostly between the second and the third postnatal week. Statistical properties of ANF spike trains showed developmental changes that approach adult-like features in older preparations...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Aaron K Remenschneider, Robert Gaudin, Elliott D Kozin, Reuven Ishai, Olivia Quatela, Tessa A Hadlock, Michael J McKenna
OBJECTIVES: Facial nerve schwannomas (FNSs) and vestibular nerve schwannomas (VNSs) may occupy similar locations in the internal auditory canal (IAC). Risk factors for hearing loss in patients with FNS are unknown. Similar to VNSs, we hypothesize that the size and location of FNSs do not correlate with hearing loss. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study and otopathology case review. METHODS: A single institution retrospective review of all patients diagnosed with FNS was performed...
October 4, 2016: Laryngoscope
Mahan Azadpour, Robert L Smith
Cochlear implants (CIs) bypass some of the mechanisms that underlie normal neural behavior as occurs in acoustic hearing. One such neural mechanism is short-term adaptation, which has been proposed to have a significant role in speech perception. Acoustically-evoked neural adaptation has been mainly attributed to the depletion of neurotransmitter in the hair-cell to auditory-nerve synapse and is therefore not fully present in CI stimulation. This study evaluated a signal processing method that integrated a physiological model of hair-cell adaptation into CI speech processing...
September 30, 2016: Hearing Research
Pankhuri Vyas, Jingjing Sherry Wu, Amanda Zimmerman, Paul Fuchs, Elisabeth Glowatzki
Acoustic information propagates from the ear to the brain via spiral ganglion neurons that innervate hair cells in the cochlea. These afferents include unmyelinated type II fibers that constitute 5 % of the total, the majority being myelinated type I neurons. Lack of specific genetic markers of type II afferents in the cochlea has been a roadblock in studying their functional role. Unexpectedly, type II afferents were visualized by reporter proteins induced by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-driven Cre recombinase...
September 30, 2016: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
G M Strain, A J Rosado Martinez, K A McGee, C L McMillan
Recordings of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) were taken from 28 geriatric dogs aged 12.2 ± 2.2 years and 15 control dogs aged 5.9 ± 3.0 years (mean ± standard deviation) to demonstrate frequency-specific changes in cochlear responses. Recordings were performed for primary frequencies of 2-12 kHz in 2 kHz increments. Brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) recordings were also made from geriatric dogs for comparison with DPOAE responses. Significant decreases in DPOAE response amplitudes were observed at frequencies of 6-12 kHz in geriatric dogs compared to control dogs, reflecting loss of cochlear outer hair cells along the length of the cochlea...
October 2016: Veterinary Journal
Gilda M Kalinec, Channy Park, Pru Thein, Federico Kalinec
HEI-OC1 is one of the few mouse auditory cell lines available for research purposes. Originally proposed as an in vitro system for screening of ototoxic drugs, these cells have been used to investigate drug-activated apoptotic pathways, autophagy, senescence, mechanism of cell protection, inflammatory responses, cell differentiation, genetic and epigenetic effects of pharmacological drugs, effects of hypoxia, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and expression of molecular channels and receptors. Among other several important markers of cochlear hair cells, HEI-OC1 cells endogenously express prestin, the paradigmatic motor protein of outer hair cells...
2016: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Ruili Xie
Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is largely attributed to structural changes and functional declines in the peripheral auditory system, which include synaptopathy at the inner hair cell/spiral ganglion cell (SGC) connection as well as the loss of SGCs. However, functional changes at the central terminals of SGCs, namely the auditory nerve synapses in the cochlear nucleus, are not yet fully understood during ARHL. Using young (1-3 months) and old (25-30 months) CBA/CaJ mice, this study evaluated the intrinsic properties of the bushy neurons postsynaptic to the endbulb of Held synapses, and the firing properties of these neurons to direct current injections as well as to synaptic inputs from the auditory nerve...
September 28, 2016: Journal of Neurophysiology
Aryn Kamerer, Francisco J Diaz, Marcello Peppi, Mark Chertoff
Current methods used to diagnose cochlear hearing loss are limited in their ability to determine the location and extent of anatomical damage to various cochlear structures. In previous experiments, we have used the electrical potential recorded at the round window -the cochlear response (CR) -to predict the location of damage to outer hair cells in the gerbil. In a follow-up experiment, we applied 10 mM ouabain to the round window niche to reduce neural activity in order to quantify the neural contribution to the CR...
September 24, 2016: Hearing Research
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