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Andrew Lederman, David Turk, Antonio Howard, Srinivas Reddy, Michelle Stern
We present the case of a 24 yr old male who was diagnosed with gluteal compartment syndrome and was subsequently found to have developed lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy and complex regional pain syndrome. The patient's gluteal compartment syndrome was diagnosed within 24 h of presentation to the emergency room, and he underwent emergent compartment release. While recovering postoperatively, persistent weakness was noted in the right lower limb. Results of electrodiagnostic testing were consistent with a lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy...
2016: Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development
David G Kline
It has been said of Silas Weir Mitchell (1829-1914) that as a young man he was first among the physiologists of his day, in middle age first among physicians, and as an older man, one of the most noted novelists of his country. Mitchell's novels were written in his later life as a means to avoid boredom during lengthy summer vacations that were the norm for that time among the affluent members of Philadelphia society. These novels were criticized by some because of poor plots, which in some instances failed to move along, or for text that offered a stereotyped depiction of genteel society and the effects that war or personal disaster had on the characters' behavior The criticism came despite the fact that all critics agreed that Mitchell's portrayals of psychopathology in his fictional characters was unique and accurate...
July 2016: Neurosurgical Focus
Il Choi, Sang Ryong Jeon
Occipital neuralgia is defined by the International Headache Society as paroxysmal shooting or stabbing pain in the dermatomes of the greater or lesser occipital nerve. Various treatment methods exist, from medical treatment to open surgical procedures. Local injection with corticosteroid can improve symptoms, though generally only temporarily. More invasive procedures can be considered for cases that do not respond adequately to medical therapies or repeated injections. Radiofrequency lesioning of the greater occipital nerve can relieve symptoms, but there is a tendency for the pain to recur during follow-up...
April 2016: Journal of Korean Medical Science
François Boller, Daniel Birnbaum
With few exceptions, neurology was nonexistent in the United States until the Civil War years. From 1861 to 1865, the United States saw a bitter armed conflict between the North (the Union) and the South (the Confederate States or Confederacy), and during those years, neurology was born in the United States. In 1861, Silas Weir Mitchell, together with George Morehouse and William Keen, opened and operated the first neurological hospital in Philadelphia, with the backing of the Surgeon General William Hammond...
2016: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
Peter J Koehler
Publications from French (Jules Tinel and Chiriachitza Athanassio-Bénisty), English (James Purves-Stewart, Arthur Henry Evans and Hartley Sidney Carter), German (Otfrid Foerster and Hermann Oppenheim) and American (Charles Harrison Frazier and Byron Stookey) physicians from both sides of the front during World War I (WWI) contributed to a dramatic increase in knowledge about peripheral nerve injuries. Silas Weir Mitchell's original experience with respect to these injuries, and particularly causalgia, during the American Civil War was further expanded in Europe during WWI...
2016: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
K Thiele, J Fussi, C Perka, T Pfitzner
BACKGROUND: Approximately 20% of patients are unsatisfied with their postoperative results after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Main causes for revision surgery are periprosthetic infection, aseptic loosing, instability and malalignment. In rare cases secondary progression of osteoarthritis of the patella, periprosthetic fractures, extensor mechanism insufficiency, polyethylene wear and arthrofibrosis can cause the necessity for a reintervention. Identifying the reason for a painful knee arthroplasty can be very difficult, but is a prerequisite for a successful therapy...
January 2016: Der Orthopäde
Anne Louise Oaklander, Steven H Horowitz
Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is the current consensus-derived name for a syndrome usually triggered by limb trauma. Required elements include prolonged, disproportionate distal-limb pain and microvascular dysregulation (e.g., edema or color changes) or altered sweating. CRPS-II (formerly "causalgia") describes patients with identified nerve injuries. CRPS-I (formerly "reflex sympathetic dystrophy") describes most patients who lack evidence of specific nerve injuries. Diagnosis is clinical and the pathophysiology involves combinations of small-fiber axonopathy, microvasculopathy, inflammation, and brain plasticity/sensitization...
2015: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
E Antebi, M Nobel
In the extremities, the vascular response to sympathetic stimulation is vasoconstriction with blanching and cooling of skin and increased sweating, whereas, blocking of the sympathetic system results in increased blood flow through cutaneous arteriovenous fistulae and cessation of sweating, thereby, resulting in increased dryness, warmth and accentuation of pink color. In the past, sympathetic denervation of the upper extremity was suggested as a treatment of many disorders; bronchial asthma, essential hypertension, peptic ulcer disease, hyperthyroidism, hyperhidrosis, vasospastic syndromes (Raynaud's disease), thoracic outlet syndrome, causalgia, post-traumatic sympathetic dystrophy (Sudeckatrophy), and angina pectoris...
October 1993: Surgical Technology International
G Claes, C Drott
Thoracoscopy - Looking into the thoracic cavity was first described in 1910 by the Swedish physician, Jacobeus. He used a cystoscope intrapleuraly in order to diagnose pleural diseases. He also used his method for cutting adhesions in order to achieve collapse of the lung in patients with tuberculosis of the lung. Thoracic sympathicotomy was first performed by Kotzareff in 1920. The operation was found to be effective for treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis. Different open techniques for sympathicotomy have since been described, the most common being the dorsal approach by Cloward in 1969...
October 1993: Surgical Technology International
Roberto Casale, Fabiola Atzeni, Piercarlo Sarzi-Puttini
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2015: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology
Toshihisa Hiraiwa, Hiroyuki Okada, Naotaka Sawada, Kimiya Nakayama, Noriyasu Senda, Minoru Kawanishi
We report a case with transition to complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) caused by nerve injury associated with crush syndrome. The diagnosis was delayed because of coma due to acute drug poisoning. A 44-year-old man had attempted suicide by taking massive amounts of psychotropic drugs 2 days earlier and was transported to our hospital by ambulance. His arms had been compressed due to the prolonged (2 days) consciousness disturbance, and he experienced non-traumatic crush syndrome and rhabdomyolysis. Acute renal failure was prevented with massive infusion and hemofiltration...
December 2014: Chūdoku Kenkyū: Chūdoku Kenkyūkai Jun Kikanshi, the Japanese Journal of Toxicology
M Bevilacqua, G Fanti, M D'Arienzo, A Porzionato, V Macchi, R De Caro
As the literature is not exhaustive with reference to the way the Turin Shroud (TS) Man was crucified, and it is not easy to draw significant information from only a "photograph" of a man on a linen sheet, this study tries to add some detail on this issue based on both image processing of high resolution photos of the TS and on experimental tests on arms and legs of human cadavers. With regard to the TS Man hands, a first hypothesis states that the left hand of the TS Man was nailed twice at two different anatomical sites: the midcarpal joint medially to the pisiform between the lunate/pyramidal and capitate/uncinate bones (Destot's space) and the radiocarpal joint between the radio, lunate and scaphoid; also the right hand would have been nailed twice...
December 2014: Injury
Yeo Ok Kim, In Ji Kim, Myung Ha Yoon
Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a very complicated chronic pain disorder that has been classified into two types (I and II). Endothelin (ET) receptors are involved in pain conditions at the spinal level. We investigated the role of spinal ET receptors in CRPS. Chronic post-ischemia pain (CPIP) was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats as a model for CRPS-I by placing a tourniquet (O-ring) at the ankle joint for 3h, and removing it to allow reperfusion. Ligation of L5 and L6 spinal nerves to induce neuropathic pain was performed as a model for CRPS-II...
January 1, 2015: Neuroscience Letters
A Hutcheson
Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy has been described under various different names such as Shoulder-hand Syndrome, Causalgia, Sudeck's Atrophy and several others (Bonica, 1973). However, the underlying pathophysiology seems to be similar in all and relates to an abnormality in sympathetic outflow to the limb as a primary disturbance. Therefore, the term Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy appears to be an appropriate general term for all of these conditions. However, there are always quite diverse symptoms relating to disordered physiology outside the Sympathetic Nervous System as a result of pain and disuse...
June 1977: Australian Journal of Physiotherapy
Porin Perić
In 1994, a consensus group of experts gathered by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) agreed on new diagnostic criteria for the reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) and causalgia, and renamed them complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) types I and II, respectively. CRPS is a complex pathophysiological entity characterised by pain, trophic and vasomotoric changes, limited function of affected body part and relatively fast development of osteoporosis of affected region. We described possible pathophysiological mechanisms which caused the pain, clinical presentation of the disease and treatment which includes all available pharmacological modalities as well as interventional procedures...
2013: Reumatizam
Vladimir Djuric
BACKGROUND: Various forms of sympathetic chain neurolysis (sympathectomy) have, at one time or another, held promise as effective treatment options for complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Complications, such as worsening pain and the development of new pain syndromes, have prevented sympathectomy from emerging as a standard intervention. In an effort to avoid poor outcomes associated with neurolysis, pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) has been proposed as a potential treatment alternative for a number of chronic neuropathic pain states, including some forms of CRPS...
July 2014: Pain Research & Management: the Journal of the Canadian Pain Society
Siva Reddy Challa
One of the biggest challenges for discovering more efficacious drugs for the control of neuropathic pain has been the diversity of chronic pain states in humans. It is now acceptable that different mechanisms contribute to normal physiologic pain, pain arising from tissue damage and pain arising from injury to the nervous system. To study pain transmission, spot novel pain targets and characterize the potential analgesic profile of new chemical entities, numerous experimental animal pain models have been developed that attempt to simulate the many human pain conditions...
March 2015: International Journal of Neuroscience
Philipp Herlyn
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2014: Zeitschrift Für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie
Marshall Devor, Michael Tal
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2014: Pain
C Peter N Watson, Susan E Mackinnon, Jonathan O Dostrovsky, Gary J Bennett, R Peter Farran, Torie Carlson
This case report describes the remarkable recovery of a patient with very long-standing, medically intractable and disabling, lower-limb, complex regional pain syndrome type II following the resection, crushing, and relocation of sensory nerves.
June 2014: Pain
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