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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28634266/30-years-of-the-mineralocorticoid-receptor-the-brain-mineralocorticoid-receptor-a-saga-in-three-episodes
#1
REVIEW
Marian Joëls, E Ronald de Kloet
In 1968, Bruce McEwen discovered that (3)H-corticosterone administered to adrenalectomised rats is retained in neurons of hippocampus rather than those of hypothalamus. This discovery signalled the expansion of endocrinology into the science of higher brain regions. With this in mind, our contribution highlights the saga of the brain mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in three episodes. First, the precloning era dominated by the conundrum of two types of corticosterone-binding receptors in the brain, which led to the identification of the high-affinity corticosterone receptor as the 'promiscuous' MR cloned in 1987 by Jeff Arriza and Ron Evans in addition to the classical glucocorticoid receptor (GR)...
July 2017: Journal of Endocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28633567/endogenous-bioelectric-signaling-networks-exploiting-voltage-gradients-for-control-of-growth-and-form
#2
Michael Levin, Giovanni Pezzulo, Joshua M Finkelstein
Living systems exhibit remarkable abilities to self-assemble, regenerate, and remodel complex shapes. How cellular networks construct and repair specific anatomical outcomes is an open question at the heart of the next-generation science of bioengineering. Developmental bioelectricity is an exciting emerging discipline that exploits endogenous bioelectric signaling among many cell types to regulate pattern formation. We provide a brief overview of this field, review recent data in which bioelectricity is used to control patterning in a range of model systems, and describe the molecular tools being used to probe the role of bioelectrics in the dynamic control of complex anatomy...
June 21, 2017: Annual Review of Biomedical Engineering
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28632897/delving-within-the-new-science-of-the-unconscious
#3
Steve Paulson, Heather A Berlin, Efrat Ginot, George Makari
What exactly is the relationship between conscious awareness and the unconscious mind? How, for example, does the brain classify and sort its different functions into conscious or unconscious processes? How has the history of human conceptualizations about the unconscious influenced current theories? Steve Paulson, executive producer of To the Best of Our Knowledge, moderated a discussion among neuroscientist Heather Berlin, psychologist Efrat Ginot, and psychiatrist George Makari to shed light on the history of the mind and the latest insights into the still emerging science of the unconscious...
June 20, 2017: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28632243/team-science-and-big-brains
#4
Anne Katz
Recently, I was honored with the task of moderating a session at the Oncology Nursing Society's 42nd Annual Congress in Denver, Colorado. The panel discussion, "Team Science: A Discussion With the Experts," was described as an opportunity to learn about team science implementation in the conduct of cancer research. The panel members were leaders in oncology research. As the session was about to begin, I looked over at the panelists and decided that this session should have been called "The Big Brains Session" because the panelists are giants in the field...
July 1, 2017: Oncology Nursing Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28628590/the-past-present-and-future-of-neurorehabilitation-from-nustep-through-iv-step-and-beyond
#5
Susan R Harris, Carolee J Winstein
PURPOSES: To present the history and aims of the STEP conferences; describe the interdependence of prevention, prediction, plasticity, and participation; reflect on where we stand today regarding those 4 Ps; and discuss how future neurorehabilitation should look for individuals with movement disorders. KEY POINTS: Physical therapists have focused primarily on tertiary prevention, emphasizing primary/secondary prevention far less. Predicting optimal response to intervention is essential for primary prevention...
July 2017: Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy: JNPT
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28628226/the-future-of-dream-science
#6
Kelly Bulkeley
This article describes the future prospects of scientific dream research. Three frontiers of investigation hold special promise: neuroscientific studies of the brain-mind system's activities during sleep (such as during lucid dreaming); systematic analyses of large collections of dream reports from diverse populations of people; and psychotherapeutic explorations of the multiple dimensions of personal and collective meaning woven into the dream experiences of each individual. Several helpful books on the science of sleep and dreaming are mentioned for further study...
June 19, 2017: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28626813/hallucinations-as-top-down-effects-on-perception
#7
R Powers Albert, Megan Kelley, Philip R Corlett
The problem of whether and how information is integrated across hierarchical brain networks embodies a fundamental tension in contemporary cognitive neuroscience, and by extension, cognitive neuropsychiatry. Indeed, the penetrability of perceptual processes in a 'top-down' manner by higher-level cognition-a natural extension of hierarchical models of perception-may contradict a strictly modular view of mental organization. Furthermore, some in the cognitive science community have challenged cognitive penetration as an unlikely, if not impossible, process...
September 2016: Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28625273/development-of-a-core-outcome-set-for-disease-modification-trials-in-mild-to-moderate-dementia-a-systematic-review-patient-and-public-consultation-and-consensus-recommendations
#8
Lucy Webster, Derek Groskreutz, Anna Grinbergs-Saull, Rob Howard, John T O'Brien, Gail Mountain, Sube Banerjee, Bob Woods, Robert Perneczky, Louise Lafortune, Charlotte Roberts, Jenny McCleery, James Pickett, Frances Bunn, David Challis, Georgina Charlesworth, Katie Featherstone, Chris Fox, Claire Goodman, Roy Jones, Sallie Lamb, Esme Moniz-Cook, Justine Schneider, Sasha Shepperd, Claire Surr, Jo Thompson-Coon, Clive Ballard, Carol Brayne, Orlaith Burke, Alistair Burns, Linda Clare, Peter Garrard, Patrick Kehoe, Peter Passmore, Clive Holmes, Ian Maidment, Fliss Murtagh, Louise Robinson, Gill Livingston
BACKGROUND: There is currently no disease-modifying treatment available to halt or delay the progression of the disease pathology in dementia. An agreed core set of the best-available and most appropriate outcomes for disease modification would facilitate the design of trials and ensure consistency across disease modification trials, as well as making results comparable and meta-analysable in future trials. OBJECTIVES: To agree a set of core outcomes for disease modification trials for mild to moderate dementia with the UK dementia research community and patient and public involvement (PPI)...
May 2017: Health Technology Assessment: HTA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28622589/improving-outcomes-for-babies-and-toddlers-in-child-welfare-a-model-for-infant-mental-health-intervention-and-collaboration
#9
Susan Chinitz, Hazel Guzman, Ellen Amstutz, Joaniko Kohchi, Miriam Alkon
Children under three comprise a sizable and growing proportion of foster care placements. Very young children who enter the child welfare system experience disruptions of critical attachments that are essential to this formative stage of brain development, as well as other traumatic events, leaving them at great risk for lifelong impairments. To reverse these concerning outcomes, babies who have been removed from their homes require intensive, relationship-based interventions that promote secure attachment to a primary caregiver and holistic attention the child's developmental needs...
June 13, 2017: Child Abuse & Neglect
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28622332/comparison-of-monocyte-gene-expression-among-patients-with-neurocysticercosis-associated-epilepsy-idiopathic-epilepsy-and-idiopathic-headaches-in-india
#10
Vasudevan Prabhakaran, Douglas A Drevets, Govindan Ramajayam, Josephine J Manoj, Michael P Anderson, Jay S Hanas, Vedantam Rajshekhar, Anna Oommen, Hélène Carabin
BACKGROUND: Neurocysticercosis (NCC), a neglected tropical disease, inflicts substantial health and economic costs on people living in endemic areas such as India. Nevertheless, accurate diagnosis using brain imaging remains poorly accessible and too costly in endemic countries. The goal of this study was to test if blood monocyte gene expression could distinguish patients with NCC-associated epilepsy, from NCC-negative imaging lesion-free patients presenting with idiopathic epilepsy or idiopathic headaches...
June 16, 2017: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28621573/update-on-the-diagnostic-value-and-safety-of-stereotactic-biopsy-for-pediatric-brainstem-tumors-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis-of-735-cases
#11
Christina Hamisch, Philipp Kickingereder, Matthias Fischer, Thorsten Simon, Maximilian I Ruge
OBJECTIVE Recent studies have shed light on the molecular makeup of diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas and led to the identification of potential treatment targets for these lesions, which account for the majority of pediatric brainstem tumors (pedBSTs). Therefore, stereotactic biopsy-driven molecular characterization of pedBSTs may become an important prerequisite for the management of these fatal brain tumors. The authors conducted a systemic review and meta-analysis to precisely determine the safety and diagnostic success of stereotactic biopsy of pedBSTs...
June 16, 2017: Journal of Neurosurgery. Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28620350/considerations-for-experimental-animal-models-of-concussion-traumatic-brain-injury-and-chronic-traumatic-encephalopathy-these-matters-matter
#12
REVIEW
Mark W Wojnarowicz, Andrew M Fisher, Olga Minaeva, Lee E Goldstein
Animal models of concussion, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) are widely available and routinely deployed in laboratories around the world. Effective animal modeling requires careful consideration of four basic principles. First, animal model use must be guided by clarity of definitions regarding the human disease or condition being modeled. Concussion, TBI, and CTE represent distinct clinical entities that require clear differentiation: concussion is a neurological syndrome, TBI is a neurological event, and CTE is a neurological disease...
2017: Frontiers in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28618012/metabolomic-signature-of-brain-cancer
#13
Renu Pandey, Laura Caflisch, Alessia Lodi, Andrew J Brenner, Stefano Tiziani
Despite advances in surgery and adjuvant therapy, brain tumours represent one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality and morbidity in both adults and children. Gliomas constitute about 60% of all cerebral tumours, showing varying degrees of malignancy. They are difficult to treat due to dismal prognosis and limited therapeutics. Metabolomics is the untargeted and targeted analyses of endogenous and exogenous small molecules, which characterizes the phenotype of an individual. This emerging "omics" science provides functional readouts of cellular activity that contribute greatly to the understanding of cancer biology including brain tumour biology...
June 15, 2017: Molecular Carcinogenesis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28617660/circuits-for-action-and-cognition-a-view-from-the-superior-colliculus
#14
Michele A Basso, Paul J May
The superior colliculus is one of the most well-studied structures in the brain, and with each new report, its proposed role in behavior seems to increase in complexity. Forty years of evidence shows that the colliculus is critical for reorienting an organism toward objects of interest. In monkeys, this involves saccadic eye movements. Recent work in the monkey colliculus and in the homologous optic tectum of the bird extends our understanding of the role of the colliculus in higher mental functions, such as attention and decision making...
June 15, 2017: Annual Review of Vision Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28614812/the-discovery-of-water-channels-aquaporins
#15
Dennis Brown
The movement of water into and out of cells is a fundamental biological process that is essential for life. Such water movement not only regulates the activity of individual cells but also is responsible for the functioning of many organ systems and for maintaining whole body water balance. It had long been suspected that water movement across biological cell membranes was in some way enhanced or facilitated by pores or channels, but the search to identify these channels was long and tedious. As is often the case in science, the secret of the water channel was eventually discovered by chance in 1992 by Peter Agre and his colleagues at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, who were working on red blood cell membrane proteins...
2017: Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28612755/learning-to-see-again-biological-constraints-on-cortical-plasticity-and-the-implications-for-sight-restoration-technologies
#16
Michael Beyeler, Ariel Rokem, Geoffrey Boynton, Ione Fine
The "bionic eye" - so long a dream of the future - is finally becoming a reality with retinal prostheses available to patients in both the US and Europe. However, clinical experience with these implants has made it apparent that the vision provided by these devices differs substantially from normal sight. Consequently, the ability to learn to make use of this abnormal retinal input plays a critical role in whether or not some functional vision is successfully regained. The goal of the present review is to summarize the vast basic science literature on developmental and adult cortical plasticity with an emphasis on how this literature might relate to the field of prosthetic vision...
June 14, 2017: Journal of Neural Engineering
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28611579/stacked-autoencoders-for-the-p300-component-detection
#17
Lukáš Vařeka, Pavel Mautner
Novel neural network training methods (commonly referred to as deep learning) have emerged in recent years. Using a combination of unsupervised pre-training and subsequent fine-tuning, deep neural networks have become one of the most reliable classification methods. Since deep neural networks are especially powerful for high-dimensional and non-linear feature vectors, electroencephalography (EEG) and event-related potentials (ERPs) are one of the promising applications. Furthermore, to the authors' best knowledge, there are very few papers that study deep neural networks for EEG/ERP data...
2017: Frontiers in Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28606625/-terrorism-and-human-behavior
#18
S J Leistedt
OBJECTIVES: Theories of religion are essential for understanding current trends in terrorist activities. The aim of this work is to clarify religion's role in facilitating terror and outline in parallel with recent theoretical developments on terrorism and human behaviour. METHODS: Several databases were used such as PubCentral, Scopus, Medline and Science Direct. The search terms "terrorism", "social psychology", "religion", "evolution", and "cognition" were used to identify relevant studies in the databases...
June 9, 2017: L'Encéphale
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28604790/sparse-eeg-meg-source-estimation-via-a-group-lasso
#19
Michael Lim, Justin M Ales, Benoit R Cottereau, Trevor Hastie, Anthony M Norcia
Non-invasive recordings of human brain activity through electroencephalography (EEG) or magnetoencelphalography (MEG) are of value for both basic science and clinical applications in sensory, cognitive, and affective neuroscience. Here we introduce a new approach to estimating the intra-cranial sources of EEG/MEG activity measured from extra-cranial sensors. The approach is based on the group lasso, a sparse-prior inverse that has been adapted to take advantage of functionally-defined regions of interest for the definition of physiologically meaningful groups within a functionally-based common space...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28603465/spinal-cord-as-an-adjunct-to-brain-magnetic-resonance-imaging-in-defining-no-evidence-of-disease-activity-in-multiple-sclerosis
#20
Subhash Tummala, Tarun Singhal, Vinit V Oommen, Gloria Kim, Fariha Khalid, Brian C Healy, Rohit Bakshi
ACTIVITY AVAILABLE ONLINE: To access the article, post-test, and evaluation online, go to http://www.cmscscholar.org. TARGET AUDIENCE: The target audience for this activity is physicians, physician assistants, nursing professionals, and other health-care providers involved in the management of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). LEARNING OBJECTIVES: 1) Describe the concept of "no evidence of disease activity" in MS.2) Recognize the role of spinal cord imaging in routine monitoring of MS disease activity...
May 2017: International Journal of MS Care
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