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Environmental exposure

Catherine Jumarie, Philippe Aras, Monique Boily
The increasing loss of bee colonies in many countries has prompted a surge of studies on the factors affecting bee health. In North America, main crops such as maize and soybean are cultivated with extensive use of pesticides that may affect non-target organisms such as bees. Also, biosolids, used as a soil amendment, represent additional sources of metals in agroecosystems; however, there is no information about how these metals could affect the bees. In previous studies we investigated the effects of environmentally relevant doses of herbicides and metals, each individually, on caged honey bees...
October 22, 2016: Chemosphere
Yoonja Kang, Ying-Zhong Tang, Gordon T Taylor, Christopher J Gobler
To date, the life stages of pelagophytes have been poorly described. This study describes the ability of Aureoumbra lagunensis to enter a resting stage in response to environmental stressors including high temperature, nutrient depletion, and darkness as well as their ability to revert from resting cells back to vegetative cells after exposure to optimal light, temperature, and nutrient conditions. Resting cells became round in shape and larger in size, filled with red accumulation bodies, had smaller and fewer plastids, more vacuolar space, contained lower concentrations of chlorophyll a and RNA, displayed reduced photosynthetic efficiency, and lower respiration rates relative to vegetative cells...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Phycology
Chirag J Patel, Nam Pho, Michael McDuffie, Jeremy Easton-Marks, Cartik Kothari, Isaac S Kohane, Paul Avillach
The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is a population survey implemented by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to monitor the health of the United States whose data is publicly available in hundreds of files. This Data Descriptor describes a single unified and universally accessible data file, merging across 255 separate files and stitching data across 4 surveys, encompassing 41,474 individuals and 1,191 variables. The variables consist of phenotype and environmental exposure information on each individual, specifically (1) demographic information, physical exam results (e...
October 25, 2016: Scientific Data
Ximena P Garzon-Villalba, Alfred Mbah, Yougui Wu, Michael Hiles, Hanna Moore, Skai W Schwartz, Thomas E Bernard
BACKGROUND: The Deepwater Horizon disaster cleanup effort provided an opportunity to examine the effects of ambient thermal conditions on exertional heat illness (EHI) and acute injury (AI). METHODS: The outcomes were daily person-based frequencies of EHI and AI. Exposures were maximum estimated WBGT (WBGTmax) and severity. Previous day's cumulative effect was assessed by introducing previous day's WBGTmax into the model. RESULTS: EHI and AI were higher in workers exposed above a WBGTmax of 20°C (RR 1...
October 24, 2016: American Journal of Industrial Medicine
J L Baker, D Shriner, A R Bentley, C N Rotimi
As the common birthplace of all human populations, modern humans have lived longer on the African continent than in any other geographical region of the world. This long history, along with the evolutionary need to adapt to environmental challenges such as exposure to infectious agents, has led to greater genetic variation in Africans. The vast genetic variation in Africans also extends to genes involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of pharmaceuticals. Ongoing cataloging of these clinically relevant variants reveals huge allele-frequency differences within and between African populations...
October 25, 2016: Pharmacogenomics Journal
José A Cornejo-García, Abderrahim Oussalah, Miguel Blanca, Rosa-María Guéant-Rodríguez, Cristobalina Mayorga, Julie Waton, Annick Barbaud, Francesco Gaeta, Antonino Romano, Jean-Louis Guéant
Our knowledge of genetic predisposing factors of drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) is still scarce. The analysis of the genetic basis of these reactions may contribute to dissect the underlying mechanisms. We will outline current knowledge of the genetic predictors of most common DHRs, including reactions to betalactam antibiotics (BLs), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and biological agents. The predictors of DHRs to BLs are mostly linked to IgE-class switching, IgE pathway and atopy (IL4R, NOD2, LGALS3) in replicated candidate gene studies, and to antigen presentation (HLA-DRA) in the single replicated GWAS performed so far...
September 27, 2016: Current Pharmaceutical Design
Ivy Shiue
Links between environmental chemicals and human health have emerged over the last few decades, but the effects from polyaromatic hydrocarbons were less studied, compared to other commonly known environmental chemicals such as heavy metals, phthalates, arsenic, phenols, pesticides, etc. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the relationships of urinary polyaromatic hydrocarbons and adult respiratory health conditions using a large human sample in a national and population-based setting in recent years...
October 24, 2016: Environmental Science and Pollution Research International
Verónica Pastor, Marta Cristina Antonelli, María Eugenia Pallarés
Substance use disorder (SUD) refers to the detrimental use of psychoactive substances and it is related to a cluster of behavioural, cognitive and physiological dysfunctions indicating that the individual continues using the substance despite significant substance-related problems. Although it is one of the most prevalent neuropsychiatric diseases affecting society worldwide, the mechanism underlying the vulnerability of certain individuals is not well understood yet. It is now widely accepted that, in addition to genetic factors, environmental adversities during critical stages of development of an organism could also be considered as risk factors that contribute to SUD...
October 24, 2016: Neurotoxicity Research
Ya-Fu Lee, Yen-Min Kuo, Wen-Chen Chu
BACKGROUND: When facing a novel situation, animals can retreat or leave to avoid risks, but will miss potential resources and opportunities. Alternatively they may reduce environmental uncertainty by exploration, while risking no energy rewards and exposure to hazards, and use the information retrieved for subsequent decision making. When exploring, however, animals may adopt different tactics according to individual states. RESULTS: We tested that energy states will affect exploratory behavior by experimenting with wild-caught untrained Eurasian tree sparrows (Passer montanus) in fasted or fed states exploring in a novel space with hidden food supply in different patch distribution patterns...
2016: Frontiers in Zoology
Anne K Ellis, Mena Soliman, Lisa M Steacy, Daniel E Adams, Barnaby Hobsbawn, Terry J B Walker
BACKGROUND: The Environmental Exposure Unit (EEU) in Kingston, Ontario, Canada is a controlled allergen challenge facility (CACF) that has been previously clinically validated for the use of ragweed and grass pollen in clinical studies. In this study we aim to validate the use of birch pollen to challenge allergic participants. METHODS: A total of 59 volunteers were screened and 38 birch allergic participants and ten non-allergics completed the study, outside of tree pollen season...
2016: Allergy, Asthma, and Clinical Immunology
Clive J Petry, Nuria Sanz Marcos, Gracielle Pimentel, M Geoffrey Hayes, Michael Nodzenski, Denise M Scholtens, Ieuan A Hughes, Carlo L Acerini, Ken K Ong, William L Lowe, David B Dunger
In addition to maternal genes and environmental exposures, variation in fetal imprinted genes could also affect maternal blood pressure during pregnancy. Our objective was to test the associations between polymorphic variants in 16 imprinted genes and maternal mean arterial blood pressures in 1160 DNA trios from 2 established birth cohorts (the Cambridge Baby Growth and Wellbeing Studies) and seek replication in 1367 Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome Study participants. Significant univariate associations, all independent of fetal sex, were observed in the Cambridge cohorts, including FAM99A rs1489945 transmitted from the mother (P=2×10(-)(4)), DLK1 rs10139403 (mother; P=9×10(-)(4)), DLK1 rs12147008 (mother; P=1×10(-)(3)), H19 rs217222 (father; P=1×10(-)(3)), SNRPN rs1453556 (father; P=1×10(-)(3)), IGF2 rs6356 (father; P=1×10(-)(3)), and NNAT rs6066671 (father; P=1×10(-)(3))...
October 24, 2016: Hypertension
Marta Oliveira, Klara Slezakova, Cristina Delerue-Matos, Maria do Carmo Pereira, Simone Morais
The present work aimed to assess exposure of preschool children to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by environmental monitoring (eighteen compounds in air) and biomonitoring (six urinary biomarkers of exposure (OH-PAHs)). The impact of preschool indoor air on excretion of urinary monohydroxyl metabolites was also evaluated. Gaseous and particulate-bound PAHs were simultaneously collected indoors and outdoors in two Portuguese preschools. PAHs and OH-PAHs were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence and photodiode array detection...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Hazardous Materials
Xiaoming Zou, Xiaoyu Xiao, Yu He, Lijun Hu, Cui Hu, Xiangfeng Huang
Hormesis is an intriguing phenomenon that is characterized by low dose stimulation and high dose inhibition. Several traditional parameters, such as the concentration of the zero equivalent point (ZEP) and the maximal stimulatory effect (Ymax), have been used to characterize the zone of hormesis or the extent of the stimulatory effect. However, the characteristics of hormesis for chemicals cannot be quantified completely by one parameter, which is important to accurately compare the hormetic effects of chemicals and to describe the combined effects of chemical mixtures at low doses...
September 20, 2016: Journal of Hazardous Materials
During recent decades, researchers have used several different parameters to evaluate the biological and health effects of in vitro and in vivo exposure to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields in animals, humans and their isolated cells. The data reported in many of publications in peer-reviewed scientific journals were reviewed by the international and national expert groups of scientists for human risk assessment of exposure to radiofrequency fields. The criteria used for such assessment depended on the study design, methodology and reporting of the data in the publication...
November 1, 2016: Mutation Research
Hui Wang, Zheng Liu, Wenxiu Zhang, Ziao Yuan, Hongyi Yuan, Xueting Liu, Chunwen Yang, Weijun Guan
BACKGROUND: Heavy metals can cause great harm to Siberian tigers in the natural environment. Cadmium (Cd(2+)) is an environmental contaminant that affects multiple cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. It has been shown to induce apoptosis in a variety of cell types and tissues. RESULTS: We investigated the apoptotic effects of Cd(2+) on Siberian tiger fibroblasts in vitro. Our research revealed the typical signs of apoptosis after Cd(2+) exposure...
October 24, 2016: Biological Research
A C Sampaio, R J Mendes, P G Castro, A M Silva
Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are used as carriers for drug delivery, and are high biocompatible and designed to endure in the host organism. Despite its current industrial production is low, many of these substances are available on the market, and much more are in the production pipeline. As a result, many of them will end in aquatic systems raising the question whether they can pose a risk to aquatic biota and the associated ecological processes. Microbial decomposers of plant litter, play a key role in forested streams being responsible for the energy flow between terrestrial and aquatic environments...
October 21, 2016: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety
M Mezzelani, S Gorbi, D Fattorini, G d'Errico, M Benedetti, M Milan, L Bargelloni, F Regoli
The aim of the present investigation was to provide new insights on accumulation and possible adverse effects of various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis, exposed to an environmentally realistic concentration (0.5μg/L) of individual compounds, Acetaminophen (AMP), Diclofenac (DIC), Ibuprofen (IBU), Ketoprofen (KET) or Nimesulide (NIM). The measurement of drugs in mussel tissues was integrated with both functional alterations at cellular level and transcriptomic responses...
October 11, 2016: Aquatic Toxicology
Lingling Li, Da Yang, Yufang Song, Yi Shi, Bin Huang, Jun Yan, Xinxin Dong
In this study, toxic effects of bifenthrin in soil on earthworms were evaluated by acute and chronic toxic endpoints combined with a set of biomarkers. Bifenthrin was moderately toxic in 72-h filter paper test and low toxic in 14-d soil test. The exposure of earthworms to bifenthrin-polluted soil for 8 weeks showed that cocoons were inhibited by high dose of bifenthrin, and larvae were stimulated by low dose but inhibited by high dose of bifenthrin. Furthermore, 28-d soil test on the responses of enzymes associated with antioxidation and detoxification in worms showed that peroxidase (POD) was stimulated by bifenthrin, superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibited in the early period but stimulated in the later period, glutathione S- transferase (GST) inhibited in the later period, and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) inhibited at day 3 but markedly stimulated at day 28 at high dose...
October 21, 2016: Chemosphere
Sushmita Das, Rakesh Mandal, Vidya Nand Rabidas, Neena Verma, Krishna Pandey, Ashok Kumar Ghosh, Sreekant Kesari, Ashish Kumar, Bidyut Purkait, Chandra Sekhar Lal, Pradeep Das
BACKGROUND: Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), with the squeal of Post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL), is a global threat for health. Studies have shown sodium stibogluconate (SSG) resistance in VL patients with chronic arsenic exposure. Here, we assessed the association between arsenic exposure and risk of developing PKDL in treated VL patients. METHODS: In this retrospective study, PKDL patients (n = 139), earlier treated with SSG or any other drug during VL, were selected from the study cohort...
October 2016: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Minji Yang, GilJae Lee, Jiyeon Si, Sung-Joon Lee, Hyun Ju You, GwangPyo Ko
Phytochemicals provide environmentally friendly and relatively inexpensive natural products, which could potentially benefit public health by controlling human norovirus (HuNoV) infection. In this study, 18 different phytochemicals were evaluated for antiviral effects against norovirus using murine norovirus (MNV) as a model for norovirus biology. Among these phytochemicals, curcumin (CCM) was the most potent anti-noroviral phytochemical, followed by resveratrol (RVT). In a cell culture infection model, exposure to CCM or RVT for 3 days reduced infectivity of norovirus by 91% and 80%, respectively...
October 20, 2016: Molecules: a Journal of Synthetic Chemistry and Natural Product Chemistry
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