keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Wildlife

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28088124/nipah-virus-transmission-of-a-zoonotic-paramyxovirus
#1
REVIEW
Bronwyn Anne Clayton
Nipah virus is a recently-recognised, zoonotic paramyxovirus that causes severe disease and high fatality rates in people. Outbreaks have occurred in Malaysia, Singapore, India and Bangladesh, and a putative Nipah virus was also recently associated with human disease in the Philippines. Worryingly, human-to-human transmission is common in Bangladesh, where outbreaks occur with near-annual frequency. Onward human transmission of Nipah virus in Bangladesh is associated with close contact with clinically-unwell patients or their infectious secretions...
January 11, 2017: Current Opinion in Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28081245/sharp-tailed-grouse-nest-survival-and-nest-predator-habitat-use-in-north-dakota-s-bakken-oil-field
#2
Paul C Burr, Aaron C Robinson, Randy T Larsen, Robert A Newman, Susan N Ellis-Felege
Recent advancements in extraction technologies have resulted in rapid increases of gas and oil development across the United States and specifically in western North Dakota. This expansion of energy development has unknown influences on local wildlife populations and the ecological interactions within and among species. Our objectives for this study were to evaluate nest success and nest predator dynamics of sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) in two study sites that represented areas of high and low energy development intensities in North Dakota...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28080996/mitigating-amphibian-chytridiomycoses-in-nature
#3
REVIEW
Trenton W J Garner, Benedikt R Schmidt, An Martel, Frank Pasmans, Erin Muths, Andrew A Cunningham, Che Weldon, Matthew C Fisher, Jaime Bosch
Amphibians across the planet face the threat of population decline and extirpation caused by the disease chytridiomycosis. Despite consensus that the fungal pathogens responsible for the disease are conservation issues, strategies to mitigate their impacts in the natural world are, at best, nascent. Reducing risk associated with the movement of amphibians, non-amphibian vectors and other sources of infection remains the first line of defence and a primary objective when mitigating the threat of disease in wildlife...
December 5, 2016: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28080909/editorial-acknowledgments
#4
(no author information available yet)
The editorial office of the Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine recognizes the following individuals for their dedication and service to the Journal for serving as a peer reviewer for manuscripts processed in 2016. The number in parentheses indicates the number of manuscripts reviewed.
December 2016: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine: Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28080908/antidog-igg-secondary-antibody-successfully-detects-igg-in-a-variety-of-aquatic-mammals
#5
Katherine Roehl, Mark Jankowski, Erik Hofmeister
Serological tests play an important role in the detection of wildlife diseases. However, while there are many commercial assays and reagents available for domestic species, there is a need to develop efficient serological assays for wildlife. In recent years, marine mammals have represented a wildlife group with emerging infectious diseases, such as influenza, brucellosis, and leptospirosis. However, with the exception of disease-agent-specific assays or functional assays, few reports describe the use of antibody detection assays in marine mammals...
December 2016: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine: Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28080899/health-and-nutritional-assessment-of-free-ranging-eastern-indigo-snakes-drymarchon-couperi-in-georgia-united-states
#6
S Emmanuelle Knafo, Terry M Norton, Mark Mitchell, Dirk J Stevenson, Natalie Hyslop, Robert Poppenga, Marcie Oliva, Tai Chen, Carolyn Cray, Samantha E J Gibbs, Lance Durden, Nancy Stedman, Stephen Divers, Ellen Dierenfeld
Clinical pathology and nutritional parameters are useful in evaluating and monitoring threatened and endangered wildlife populations, but reference ranges for most snake species are lacking. From 2001 to 2005, health assessments were performed on 58 eastern indigo snakes (EIS) (Drymarchon couperi) captured in the wild in southeastern Georgia, United States. Health and nutritional assessments performed included hematology, serum biochemistry, fat-soluble vitamins, heavy metals, pesticide contaminants, parasitology, and surveys of other pathogens...
December 2016: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine: Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28079086/conservation-effects-of-wildlife-trade-mapped
#7
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 11, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28078890/metamorphosis-affects-metal-concentrations-and-isotopic-signatures-in-a-mayfly-baetis-tricaudatus-implications-for-the-aquatic-terrestrial-transfer-of-metals
#8
Jeff S Wesner, David M Walters, Travis S Schmidt, Johanna M Kraus, Craig A Stricker, William H Clements, Ruth E Wolf
Insect metamorphosis often results in substantial chemical changes that can alter contaminant concentrations and fractionate isotopes. We exposed larval mayflies (Baetis tricaudatus) and their food (periphyton) to an aqueous zinc gradient (3-340 µg Zn/l) and measured zinc concentrations at different stages of metamorphosis: larval, subimago, and imago. We also measured changes in stable isotopes (δ15N and δ13C) in unexposed mayflies. Larval zinc concentrations were positively related to aqueous zinc, increasing 9-fold across the exposure gradient...
January 12, 2017: Environmental Science & Technology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28078492/first-report-of-bla-ctx-m-15-type-esbl-producing-klebsiella-pneumoniae-in-wild-migratory-birds-in-pakistan
#9
Shahbaz Raza, Mashkoor Mohsin, Waqas Ahmed Madni, Fatima Sarwar, Muhammad Saqib, Bilal Aslam
We investigated wild migratory birds faecal swabs for extended-spectrum β-lactamases-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-K. pneumoniae) from wetland habitats in Pakistan. ESBL-K. pneumoniae were analysed for MDR phenotype, ESBL genotype and genetic diversity. A total of 13 (8.6%) ESBL-K. pneumoniae were recovered. Of these, 8 (61%) isolates were MDR. DNA sequencing confirmed bla CTX-M-15 as the dominant ESBL genotype. BOX-PCR fingerprints showed most of the isolates are unrelated. This study is the first to report the wildlife contamination of CTX-M-15-producing K...
January 11, 2017: EcoHealth
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28078389/responses-of-a-federally-endangered-songbird-to-understory-thinning-in-oak-juniper-woodlands
#10
Ashley M Long, Mike E Marshall, Michael L Morrison, K Brian Hays, Shannon L Farrell
Wildlife conservation and management on military lands must be accomplished in the context of military readiness, which often includes ground-based training that is perceived to conflict with wildlife needs and environmental regulations. From 2008‒2012, we examined territory density, pairing success, and fledging success of the federally endangered golden-cheeked warbler (Setophaga chrysoparia; hereafter warbler) in relation to removal of small-diameter trees from the understory of mature oak-juniper (Quercus-Juniperus) woodland at the 87,890 ha Fort Hood Military Reservation in central Texas...
January 11, 2017: Environmental Management
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28076444/wiseeye-next-generation-expandable-and-programmable-camera-trap-platform-for-wildlife-research
#11
Sajid Nazir, Scott Newey, R Justin Irvine, Fabio Verdicchio, Paul Davidson, Gorry Fairhurst, René van der Wal
The widespread availability of relatively cheap, reliable and easy to use digital camera traps has led to their extensive use for wildlife research, monitoring and public outreach. Users of these units are, however, often frustrated by the limited options for controlling camera functions, the generation of large numbers of images, and the lack of flexibility to suit different research environments and questions. We describe the development of a user-customisable open source camera trap platform named 'WiseEye', designed to provide flexible camera trap technology for wildlife researchers...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28074717/endosulfan-poisoning-in-canids-and-felids-in-the-calabria-region-of-southern-italy
#12
Antonella De Roma, Carmela Rossini, Caterina Riverso, Giorgio Galiero, Mauro Esposito
Endosulfan, a highly toxic insecticide and acaricide, was globally banned under the Stockholm Convention in May 2011 because of its threats to human health and the environment. Despite the ban on its use, endosulfan is still present in the environment, causing poisoning events in domestic animals and wildlife. Toxicologic analysis of poisoned animals conducted by the Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Mezzogiorno revealed that in the past 3 y, this pesticide has not disappeared in the regions of interest...
January 2017: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28074624/assessing-the-sustainability-of-waiwai-subsistence-hunting-in-guyana-with-implications-for-co-management-in-amazonian-indigenous-reserves
#13
Christopher A Shaffer, Marissa S Milstein, Charakura Yukuma, Elisha Marawanaru, Phillip Suse
While hunting is a key component of the subsistence strategies of many Amazonians, it is also one of the most important threats to wildlife conservation throughout South America. As indigenous reserves now make up more than 20% of Amazonia, effective conservation often requires working closely with indigenous groups as shared stakeholders in the management of hunting. We present a novel approach to co-management that integrates hunter generated harvesting data with spatially explicit, biodemographic modeling to assess the sustainability of the subsistence hunting of indigenous Waiwai in Guyana...
January 11, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28074559/effects-of-traffic-noise-on-tree-frog-stress-levels-immunity-and-color-signaling
#14
Mathieu Troïanowski, Nathalie Mondy, Adeline Dumet, Caroline Arcanjo, Thierry Lengagne
During the last decade, many studies have focused on the detrimental effects of noise pollution on acoustic communication. Surprisingly, while it is known that noise exposure strongly influences health in humans, studies on wildlife remain scarce. In order to gain insight into the consequences of traffic noise exposure, we experimentally manipulated traffic noise exposure as well as the endocrine status of animals to investigate physiological and phenotypic consequences of noise pollution in an anuran species...
January 11, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28073507/evidence-of-freshwater-algal-toxins-in-marine-shellfish-implications-for-human-and-aquatic-health
#15
Corinne M Gibble, Melissa B Peacock, Raphael M Kudela
The occurrence of freshwater harmful algal bloom toxins impacting the coastal ocean is an emerging threat, and the potential for invertebrate prey items to concentrate toxin and cause harm to human and wildlife consumers is not yet fully recognized. We examined toxin uptake and release in marine mussels for both particulate and dissolved phases of the hepatotoxin microcystin, produced by the freshwater cyanobacterial genus Microcystis. We also extended our experimental investigation of particulate toxin to include oysters (Crassostrea sp...
November 2016: Harmful Algae
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28073500/initial-skill-assessment-of-the-california-harmful-algae-risk-mapping-c-harm-system
#16
Clarissa R Anderson, Raphael M Kudela, Mati Kahru, Yi Chao, Leslie K Rosenfeld, Frederick L Bahr, David M Anderson, Tenaya A Norris
Toxic algal events are an annual burden on aquaculture and coastal ecosystems of California. The threat of domoic acid (DA) toxicity to human and wildlife health is the dominant harmful algal bloom (HAB) concern for the region, leading to a strong focus on prediction and mitigation of these blooms and their toxic effects. This paper describes the initial development of the California Harmful Algae Risk Mapping (C-HARM) system that predicts the spatial likelihood of blooms and dangerous levels of DA using a unique blend of numerical models, ecological forecast models of the target group, Pseudo-nitzschia, and satellite ocean color imagery...
November 2016: Harmful Algae
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28070965/the-consequences-of-avian-ocular-trauma-histopathological-evidence-and-implications-of-acute-and-chronic-disease
#17
Bret A Moore, Leandro B C Teixeira, William E Sponsel, Richard R Dubielzig
OBJECTIVE: To present a description and categorization of the histopathological lesions in avian ocular trauma. ANIMAL STUDIED: Seventy-five birds diagnosed with ocular trauma at to the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin. PROCEDURES: Histological slides were reviewed, and the type of trauma was classified by cause into either (i) blunt trauma or (ii) penetrating trauma and by duration into (i) acute or (ii) chronic. RESULTS: Blunt trauma was the most common source of trauma, and the most frequent lesions were observed in the retina (91%), with 71% of retinas having a tear or detachment and 46% of retinas showing chronic degenerative changes...
January 10, 2017: Veterinary Ophthalmology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28070300/a-before-after-control-impact-assessment-to-understand-the-potential-impacts-of-highway-construction-noise-and-activity-on-an-endangered-songbird
#18
Ashley M Long, Melanie R Colón, Jessica L Bosman, Dianne H Robinson, Hannah L Pruett, Tiffany M McFarland, Heather A Mathewson, Joseph M Szewczak, J Cal Newnam, Michael L Morrison
Anthropogenic noise associated with highway construction and operation can have individual- and population-level consequences for wildlife (e.g., reduced densities, decreased reproductive success, behavioral changes). We used a before-after control-impact study design to examine the potential impacts of highway construction and traffic noise on endangered golden-cheeked warblers (Setophaga chrysoparia; hereafter warbler) in urban Texas. We mapped and monitored warbler territories before (2009-2011), during (2012-2013), and after (2014) highway construction at three study sites: a treatment site exposed to highway construction and traffic noise, a control site exposed only to traffic noise, and a second control site exposed to neither highway construction or traffic noise...
January 2017: Ecology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28069959/climatic-regulation-of-the-neurotoxin-domoic-acid
#19
S Morgaine McKibben, William Peterson, A Michelle Wood, Vera L Trainer, Matthew Hunter, Angelicque E White
Domoic acid is a potent neurotoxin produced by certain marine microalgae that can accumulate in the foodweb, posing a health threat to human seafood consumers and wildlife in coastal regions worldwide. Evidence of climatic regulation of domoic acid in shellfish over the past 20 y in the Northern California Current regime is shown. The timing of elevated domoic acid is strongly related to warm phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the Oceanic Niño Index, an indicator of El Niño events. Ocean conditions in the northeast Pacific that are associated with warm phases of these indices, including changes in prevailing currents and advection of anomalously warm water masses onto the continental shelf, are hypothesized to contribute to increases in this toxin...
January 9, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28068411/projected-impacts-of-climate-urbanization-water-management-and-wetland-restoration-on-waterbird-habitat-in-california-s-central-valley
#20
Elliott L Matchett, Joseph P Fleskes
The Central Valley of California is one of the most important regions for wintering waterbirds in North America despite extensive anthropogenic landscape modification and decline of historical wetlands there. Like many other mediterranean-climate ecosystems across the globe, the Central Valley has been subject to a burgeoning human population and expansion and intensification of agricultural and urban development that have impacted wildlife habitats. Future effects of urban development, changes in water supply management, and precipitation and air temperature related to global climate change on area of waterbird habitat in the Central Valley are uncertain, yet potentially substantial...
2017: PloS One
keyword
keyword
75436
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"