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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28636611/unmanned-aircraft-systems-as-a-new-source-of-disturbance-for-wildlife-a-systematic-review
#1
Margarita Mulero-Pázmány, Susanne Jenni-Eiermann, Nicolas Strebel, Thomas Sattler, Juan José Negro, Zulima Tablado
The use of small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS; also known as "drones") for professional and personal-leisure use is increasing enormously. UAS operate at low altitudes (<500 m) and in any terrain, thus they are susceptible to interact with local fauna, generating a new type of anthropogenic disturbance that has not been systematically evaluated. To address this gap, we performed a review of the existent literature about animals' responses to UAS flights and conducted a pooled analysis of the data to determine the probability and intensity of the disturbance, and to identify the factors influencing animals' reactions towards the small aircraft...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28636590/host-and-viral-traits-predict-zoonotic-spillover-from-mammals
#2
Kevin J Olival, Parviez R Hosseini, Carlos Zambrana-Torrelio, Noam Ross, Tiffany L Bogich, Peter Daszak
The majority of human emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic, with viruses that originate in wild mammals of particular concern (for example, HIV, Ebola and SARS). Understanding patterns of viral diversity in wildlife and determinants of successful cross-species transmission, or spillover, are therefore key goals for pandemic surveillance programs. However, few analytical tools exist to identify which host species are likely to harbour the next human virus, or which viruses can cross species boundaries. Here we conduct a comprehensive analysis of mammalian host-virus relationships and show that both the total number of viruses that infect a given species and the proportion likely to be zoonotic are predictable...
June 21, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28636345/levels-of-organochlorine-pesticides-are-associated-with-amyloid-aggregation-in-apex-avian-brains
#3
Kelly A Heys, Richard F Shore, M Gloria Pereira, Francis Luke Martin
Organochlorine (OC) pesticides pose a significant environmental risk to wildlife and humans and have been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study aims to spectroscopically analyse brains from free-flying birds and link the results to OC exposure and consequent amyloid aggregation. As long-lived apex predators, predatory birds represent a sentinel species similar to humans. Therefore, the results have implications for both species and may also add to our understanding of the role OC pesticides play in the development of AD...
June 21, 2017: Environmental Science & Technology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28636199/widespread-occurrence-and-potential-for-biodegradation-of-bioactive-contaminants-in-congaree-national-park-usa
#4
Paul M Bradley, William A Battaglin, Jimmy M Clark, Frank Henning, Michelle L Hladik, Luke R Iwanowicz, Celeste A Journey, Jeffrey W Riley, Kristin M Romanok
Organic contaminants with designed molecular bioactivity, such as pesticides and pharmaceuticals, originate from human and agricultural sources, occur frequently in surface waters, and threaten the structure and function of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Congaree National Park in South Carolina (USA) is a vulnerable park unit due to its location downstream of multiple urban and agricultural contaminant sources and its hydrologic setting, being composed almost entirely of floodplain and aquatic environments...
June 21, 2017: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28636099/spectators-or-participants-how-can-setac-become-more-engaged-in-international-climate-change-research-programs
#5
Ralph G Stahl, Jennifer L Stauber, William H Clements
Environmental toxicologists and chemists have been crucial to evaluating the chemical fate and toxicological effects of environmental contaminants, including chlorinated pesticides, before and after Rachel Carson's publication of Silent Spring in 1962. Like chlorinated pesticides previously, global climate change is widely considered to be one of the most important environmental challenges of our time. Over the past 30 yr, climate scientists and modelers have shown that greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4 cause radiative forcing (climate forcing) and lead to increased global temperatures...
June 21, 2017: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28632416/survival-of-escherichia-coli-on-lettuce-under-field-conditions-encountered-in-the-northeastern-united-states
#6
Daniel L Weller, Jasna Kovac, Sherry Roof, David J Kent, Jeffrey I Tokman, Barbara Kowalcyk, David Oryang, Renata Ivanek, Anna Aceituno, Christopher Sroka, Martin Wiedmann
Although wildlife intrusion and untreated manure have been associated with microbial contamination of produce, relatively few studies have examined the survival of Escherichia coli on produce under field conditions following contamination (e.g., via splash from wildlife feces). This experimental study was performed to estimate the die-off rate of E. coli on preharvest lettuce following contamination with a fecal slurry. During August 2015, field-grown lettuce was inoculated via pipette with a fecal slurry that was spiked with a three-strain cocktail of rifampin-resistant nonpathogenic E...
June 20, 2017: Journal of Food Protection
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28631229/do-terrestrial-animals-avoid-areas-close-to-turbines-in-functioning-wind-farms-in-agricultural-landscapes
#7
Rafał Łopucki, Daniel Klich, Sylwia Gielarek
Most studies on the effects of wind energy on animals have focused on avian and bat activity, habitat use, and mortality, whereas very few have been published on terrestrial, non-volant wildlife. In this paper, we studied the utilization of functioning wind farm areas by four terrestrial animals common to agricultural landscapes: European roe deer, European hare, red fox, and the common pheasant. Firstly, we expected that the studied animals do not avoid areas close to turbines and utilize the whole area of functioning wind farms with a frequency similar to the control areas...
July 2017: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28631116/environmental-factors-and-zoonotic-pathogen-ecology-in-urban-exploiter-species
#8
REVIEW
Jamie L Rothenburger, Chelsea H Himsworth, Nicole M Nemeth, David L Pearl, Claire M Jardine
Knowledge of pathogen ecology, including the impacts of environmental factors on pathogen and host dynamics, is essential for determining the risk that zoonotic pathogens pose to people. This review synthesizes the scientific literature on environmental factors that influence the ecology and epidemiology of zoonotic microparasites (bacteria, viruses and protozoa) in globally invasive urban exploiter wildlife species (i.e., rock doves [Columba livia domestica], European starlings [Sturnus vulgaris], house sparrows [Passer domesticus], Norway rats [Rattus norvegicus], black rats [R...
June 19, 2017: EcoHealth
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28630712/quantifying-drivers-of-wild-pig-movement-across-multiple-spatial-and-temporal-scales
#9
Shannon L Kay, Justin W Fischer, Andrew J Monaghan, James C Beasley, Raoul Boughton, Tyler A Campbell, Susan M Cooper, Stephen S Ditchkoff, Steve B Hartley, John C Kilgo, Samantha M Wisely, A Christy Wyckoff, Kurt C VerCauteren, Kim M Pepin
BACKGROUND: The movement behavior of an animal is determined by extrinsic and intrinsic factors that operate at multiple spatio-temporal scales, yet much of our knowledge of animal movement comes from studies that examine only one or two scales concurrently. Understanding the drivers of animal movement across multiple scales is crucial for understanding the fundamentals of movement ecology, predicting changes in distribution, describing disease dynamics, and identifying efficient methods of wildlife conservation and management...
2017: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28627433/comparison-of-g-protein-sequences-of-south-african-street-rabies-viruses-showing-distinct-progression-of-the-disease-in-a-mouse-model-of-experimental-rabies
#10
Wonhyo Seo, Alexandre Servat, Florence Cliquet, Jenkins Akinbowale, Christophe Prehaud, Monique Lafon, Claude Sabeta
Rabies is a fatal zoonotic disease and infections generally lead to a fatal encephalomyelitis in both humans and animals. In South Africa, domestic (dogs) and the wildlife (yellow mongoose) host species maintain the canid and mongoose rabies variants respectively. In this study, pathogenicity differences of South African canid and mongoose rabies viruses were investigated in a murine model, by assessing the progression of clinical signs and survivorship. Comparison of glycoprotein gene sequences revealed amino acid differences that may underpin the observed pathogenicity differences...
June 13, 2017: Microbes and Infection
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28626635/eosinophilic-meningoencephalitis-associated-with-rat-lungworm-angiostrongylus-cantonensis-migration-in-two-nine-banded-armadillos-dasypus-novemcinctus-and-an-opossum-didelphis-virginiana-in-the-southeastern-united-states
#11
Martha F Dalton, Heather Fenton, Christopher A Cleveland, Elizabeth J Elsmo, Michael J Yabsley
Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the rat lungworm, was the cause of neural larval migrans in two nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) and one Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) from the southeastern United States. Histologic findings in all three cases included eosinophilic meningoencephalitis with variable numbers of nematode larvae in the meninges or the neuroparenchyma. In two of the three cases, nematodes were extracted from brain tissue via a "squash prep" method. Identification of the nematodes was confirmed by amplification and sequence analysis of the partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene from all three cases...
August 2017: International Journal for Parasitology. Parasites and Wildlife
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28626278/natural-stranding-of-atlantic-sturgeon-acipenser-oxyrinchus-mitchill-1815-in-scot-s-bay-bay-of-fundy-nova-scotia-from-populations-of-concern-in-the-united-states-and-canada
#12
N D Stewart, Y Cormier, L M Logan-Chesney, G Gibson, I Wirgin, M J Dadswell, M J W Stokesbury
Natural mortality of Atlantic sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus) has been determined to be low (M = 0.07). Reported herein is the mortality by beach stranding of 11 Atlantic sturgeon in Scot's Bay, part of the inner Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia, Canada on 22 June 2014. Genetic analyses, histological analysis and age determination were performed to determine origin, maturity stage and age of the stranded Atlantic sturgeon. Microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA analyses indicated that four of the Atlantic sturgeon (2 males and 2 females) were from the Saint John River, NB population, which was designated as threatened by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada...
June 2017: Zeitschrift Für Angewandte Ichthyologie, Journal of Applied Ichthyology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28623798/monitoring-the-ecotoxicity-of-%C3%AE-al2o3-and-ni-%C3%AE-al2o3-nanomaterials-by-means-of-a-battery-of-bioassays
#13
Gabriela Svartz, Mariana Papa, Marina Gosatti, Marianela Jordán, Analia Soldati, Paula Samter, María M Guraya, Cristina Pérez Coll, Soledad Perez Catán
The increasing application of nanoparticles (NPs) to a variety of new technologies has become a matter of concern due to the potential toxicity of these materials. Many questions about the fate of NPs in the environment and the subsequent impact on ecosystems need to be answered. The aim of this work was to evaluate the ecotoxicity of two alumina-based nanoceramics, γ-Al2O3 (NC) and Ni/ γ-Al2O3 (NiNC) by means of three different standardized tests: Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD5), bioassay with luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri; Microtox), and bioassay on amphibian larvae (Rhinella arenarum) (AMPHITOX)...
June 14, 2017: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28623210/stepping-up-to-fight-wildlife-crime
#14
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 17, 2017: Veterinary Record
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28622789/characterization-of-the-epidemiology-of-bat-borne-rabies-in-chile-between-2003-and-2013
#15
Raul Alegria-Moran, Daniela Miranda, Matt Barnard, Alonso Parra, Lisette Lapierre
Rabies is a zoonotic disease of great impact to public health. According to the World Health Organization, the country of Chile is currently declared free from human rabies transmitted by dogs. An epidemiological characterization and description was conducted using rabies data from 2003 to 2013 held by the National Program for Prevention and Control of Rabies from the Ministry of Health, consisting of bats samples reported as suspect and samples taken by active surveillance (bats brain tissue). Spatial autocorrelation analysis was performed using Local Indicators of Spatial Association (LISA) statistics, particularly Moran's I index, for the detection of spatial clusters...
August 1, 2017: Preventive Veterinary Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28619142/drivers-of-bartonella-infection-in-micromammals-and-their-fleas-in-a-mediterranean-peri-urban-area
#16
Aitor Cevidanes, Laura Altet, Andrea D Chirife, Tatiana Proboste, Javier Millán
People living at the human/wildlife interface are at risk of becoming infected with Bartonella for which micromammals act as reservoir. We aimed to determine the factors related to the prevalence of Bartonella and its haplotype diversity in micromammals and in their fleas in a Mediterranean peri-urban environment. We analyzed 511 micromammals, chiefly 407 wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus), captured into Barcelona metropolitan area (Spain) in spring and autumn from 2011 to 2013 in two natural and two adjacent residential areas, their fleas (grouped in 218 monospecific pools) and 29 fetuses from six Bartonella-positive female wood mice...
May 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28619108/scavenging-on-a-pulsed-resource-quality-matters-for-corvids-but-density-for-mammals
#17
Gjermund Gomo, Jenny Mattisson, Bjørn Roar Hagen, Pål Fossland Moa, Tomas Willebrand
BACKGROUND: Human food subsidies can provide predictable food sources in large quantities for wildlife species worldwide. In the boreal forest of Fennoscandia, gut piles from moose (Alces alces) harvest provide a potentially important food source for a range of opportunistically scavenging predators. Increased populations of predators can negatively affect threatened or important game species. As a response to this, restrictions on field dressing of moose are under consideration in parts of Norway...
June 15, 2017: BMC Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28616660/arenavirus-dynamics-in-experimentally-and-naturally-infected-rodents
#18
Joachim Mariën, Benny Borremans, Sophie Gryseels, Bram Vanden Broecke, Beate Becker-Ziaja, Rhodes Makundi, Apia Massawe, Jonas Reijniers, Herwig Leirs
Infectious diseases of wildlife are typically studied using data on antibody and pathogen levels. In order to interpret these data, it is necessary to know the course of antibodies and pathogen levels after infection. Such data are typically collected using experimental infection studies in which host individuals are inoculated in the laboratory and sampled over an extended period, but because laboratory conditions are controlled and much less variable than natural conditions, the immune response and pathogen dynamics may differ...
June 14, 2017: EcoHealth
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28616507/the-first-report-of-escherichia-fergusonii-isolated-from-non-human-primates-in-africa
#19
Barbara Glover, Jeanette Wentzel, Akinbowale Jenkins, Moritz Van Vuuren
The aim of this study was to determine the resistance phenotypes of selected enteric bacteria isolated from non-human primates at a wildlife-human interface. Bacterial isolates from faecal samples of non-human primates at two wildlife rehabilitation centres in South Africa were screened for the presence of Escherichia coli. The biochemical characterisation of E. coli and E. coli-like bacteria revealed both adonitol positive and sorbitol negative strains - a unique characteristic of Escherichia fergusonii and Escherichia coli K99...
June 2017: One Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28616504/q-fever-in-an-endemic-region-of-north-queensland-australia-a-10%C3%A2-year-review
#20
Pirathaban Sivabalan, Apoorva Saboo, James Yew, Robert Norton
BACKGROUND: Q fever is a zoonotic infection caused by Coxiella burnetii. Endemic Q fever has long been recognised in north Queensland, with north Queensland previously acknowledged to have the highest rate of notification in Australia. In this retrospective study, we reviewed the demographics and exposure of patients diagnosed with Q fever in an endemic region of north Queensland, to identify trends and exposure factors for the acquisition of Q fever. METHODS: A retrospective study looking at patients in the region that had tested positive for Q fever by case ascertainment between 2004 and 2014...
June 2017: One Health
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