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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28333995/better-living-through-conifer-removal-a-demographic-analysis-of-sage-grouse-vital-rates
#1
John P Severson, Christian A Hagen, Jason D Tack, Jeremy D Maestas, David E Naugle, James T Forbes, Kerry P Reese
Sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) obligate wildlife species such as the imperiled greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) face numerous threats including altered ecosystem processes that have led to conifer expansion into shrub-steppe. Conifer removal is accelerating despite a lack of empirical evidence on grouse population response. Using a before-after-control-impact design at the landscape scale, we evaluated effects of conifer removal on two important demographic parameters, annual survival of females and nest survival, by monitoring 219 female sage-grouse and 225 nests in the northern Great Basin from 2010 to 2014...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332653/review-of-the-foot-and-mouth-disease-situation-in-north-africa-and-the-risk-of-introducing-the-disease-into-europe
#2
R Bouguedour, A Ripani
Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals, including cattle, pigs, sheep, goats, and certain wildlife species. The disease can cause massive economic losses when introduced into countries that were free from the infection, generating negative effects due to reduced animal productivity and restrictions on international livestock trade. Following 15 years of FMD absence, Tunisia and Algeria experienced an incursion of the disease in 2014. The epidemiological situation and disease control measures in operation for FMD in the North African region are not homogeneous...
December 2016: Revue Scientifique et Technique
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332644/implementing-wildlife-disease-surveillance-in-the-netherlands-a-one-health-approach
#3
M Maas, A Gröne, T Kuiken, G Van Schaik, H I J Roest, J W B Van Der Giessen
The surveillance of (emerging) wildlife diseases can provide important, objective evidence of the circulation of pathogens of interest for veterinary and/or public health. The involvement of multiple research institutions in wildlife disease surveillance can ensure the best use of existing knowledge and expertise, but can also complicate or add challenges to the integration of wildlife disease surveillance components into a national programme. Documenting the existing efforts in a country's surveillance of wildlife diseases, including the institutes in which it takes place, provides a basis for policy-makers and authorities to identify gaps and priorities in their current surveillance programmes...
December 2016: Revue Scientifique et Technique
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332127/a-review-of-zoonotic-infection-risks-associated-with-the-wild-meat-trade-in-malaysia
#4
REVIEW
Jennifer Caroline Cantlay, Daniel J Ingram, Anna L Meredith
The overhunting of wildlife for food and commercial gain presents a major threat to biodiversity in tropical forests and poses health risks to humans from contact with wild animals. Using a recent survey of wildlife offered at wild meat markets in Malaysia as a basis, we review the literature to determine the potential zoonotic infection risks from hunting, butchering and consuming the species offered. We also determine which taxa potentially host the highest number of pathogens and discuss the significant disease risks from traded wildlife, considering how cultural practices influence zoonotic transmission...
March 22, 2017: EcoHealth
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28331590/when-perception-reflects-reality-non-native-grass-invasion-alters-small-mammal-risk-landscapes-and-survival
#5
Joseph P Ceradini, Anna D Chalfoun
Modification of habitat structure due to invasive plants can alter the risk landscape for wildlife by, for example, changing the quality or availability of refuge habitat. Whether perceived risk corresponds with actual fitness outcomes, however, remains an important open question. We simultaneously measured how habitat changes due to a common invasive grass (cheatgrass, Bromus tectorum) affected the perceived risk, habitat selection, and apparent survival of a small mammal, enabling us to assess how well perceived risk influenced important behaviors and reflected actual risk...
March 2017: Ecology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28331551/environmental-costs-and-benefits-of-growing-miscanthus-for-bioenergy-in-the-uk
#6
REVIEW
Jon P McCalmont, Astley Hastings, Niall P McNamara, Goetz M Richter, Paul Robson, Iain S Donnison, John Clifton-Brown
Planting the perennial biomass crop Miscanthus in the UK could offset 2-13 Mt oil eq. yr(-1), contributing up to 10% of current energy use. Policymakers need assurance that upscaling Miscanthus production can be performed sustainably without negatively impacting essential food production or the wider environment. This study reviews a large body of Miscanthus relevant literature into concise summary statements. Perennial Miscanthus has energy output/input ratios 10 times higher (47.3 ± 2.2) than annual crops used for energy (4...
March 2017: Global Change Biology. Bioenergy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28329422/patterns-in-greater-sage-grouse-population-dynamics-correspond-with-public-grazing-records-at-broad-scales
#7
Adrian P Monroe, Cameron L Aldridge, Timothy J Assal, Kari E Veblen, David A Pyke, Michael L Casazza
Human land use, such as livestock grazing, can have profound yet varied effects on wildlife interacting within common ecosystems, yet our understanding of land-use effects is often generalized from short-term, local studies that may not correspond with trends at broader scales. Here we used public land records to characterize livestock grazing across Wyoming, USA, and we used Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) as a model organism to evaluate responses to livestock management. With annual counts of male Sage-grouse from 743 leks (breeding display sites) during 2004-2014, we modeled population trends in response to grazing level (represented by a relative grazing index) and timing across a gradient in vegetation productivity as measured by the Normalized Vegetation Difference Index (NDVI)...
March 22, 2017: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28328924/scientific-crowdsourcing-in-wildlife-research-and-conservation-tigers-panthera-tigris-as-a-case-study
#8
Özgün Emre Can, Neil D'Cruze, Margaret Balaskas, David W Macdonald
With around 3,200 tigers (Panthera tigris) left in the wild, the governments of 13 tiger range countries recently declared that there is a need for innovation to aid tiger research and conservation. In response to this call, we created the "Think for Tigers" study to explore whether crowdsourcing has the potential to innovate the way researchers and practitioners monitor tigers in the wild. The study demonstrated that the benefits of crowdsourcing are not restricted only to harnessing the time, labor, and funds from the public but can also be used as a tool to harness creative thinking that can contribute to development of new research tools and approaches...
March 2017: PLoS Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28328146/conservation-and-the-four-rs-which-are-rescue-rehabilitation-release-and-research
#9
REVIEW
Graham H Pyke, Judit K Szabo
Vertebrate animals can be injured or threatened with injury through human activities, thus warranting their 'rescue'. Details of wildlife Rescue, Rehabilitation, Release, and associated Research (our 4 R's) are often recorded in large databases, resulting in a wealth of information. This information has huge research potential and can contribute to our understanding of animal biology, anthropogenic impacts on wildlife, and species conservation. However, such databases have been little used, few studies have evaluated factors influencing success of rehabilitation and/or release, recommended actions to conserve threatened species have rarely arisen, and direct benefits for species conservation are yet to be demonstrated...
March 22, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28327846/-childhood-leptospirosis-in-patients-with-febrile-syndrome-in-the-region-of-urab%C3%A3-colombia
#10
Janeth Pérez-García, Margarita Arboleda, Piedad Agudelo-Flórez
The aim of the study was to discover cases of childhood leptospirosis in four municipalities in the region of Urabá (Colombia) and the factors related to the severity of clinical manifestations. A retrospective cross-sectional study assessed 74 children aged younger than 17 years with febrile syndrome due to leptospirosis between 2010 and 2012. The majority of cases were in children from urban areas (57/74; 77%), between 10 and 14 years of age (33/74; 44.5%). The microscopic agglutination test (MAT) revealed that the most frequent serogroups were Grippotyphosa and Bratislava, which are associated with wildlife and livestock reservoirs, respectively...
October 2016: Revista Peruana de Medicina Experimental y Salud Pública
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28325981/tracking-data-from-nine-free-roaming-cheetahs-acinonyx-jubatus-collared-in-the-thabazimbi-area-limpopo-province-south-africa
#11
Kelly Marnewick, Samantha Page-Nicholson, Lizanne Roxburgh, Michael J Somers
BACKGROUND: In partnership with the University of Pretoria, the Endangered Wildlife Trust's Carnivore Conservation Programme collared six male and three female free-roaming Cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) in the Thabazimbi area in Limpopo Province, South Africa. This study was undertaken to determine the spatial ecology of free-roaming Cheetahs that occur outside of formal protected areas on private ranchland, where they frequently come into conflict with, and are sometimes killed by, private landowners...
2017: Biodiversity Data Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28325904/abundance-of-badgers-meles-meles-in-england-and-wales
#12
Johanna Judge, Gavin J Wilson, Roy Macarthur, Robbie A McDonald, Richard J Delahay
The European badger (Meles meles) is of considerable interest in the UK as it is both a protected species and the main wildlife reservoir for bovine tuberculosis infection in cattle. While there have been three national badger surveys in the 1980s, 1990s and 2011-13, using the number of badger main setts as a proxy for the abundance of badger social groups, none has combined contemporary data on social group size at landscape and national scales. We estimated social group size by genotyping hair samples collected at 120 main setts across England and Wales and employing a capture-mark-recapture method based on genotypes...
March 21, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28325373/host-parasite-relationships-and-life-histories-of-trypanosomes-in-australia
#13
C Cooper, P L Clode, C Peacock, R C A Thompson
Trypanosomes constitute a group of flagellate protozoan parasites responsible for a number of important, yet neglected, diseases in both humans and livestock. The most significantly studied include the causative agents of African sleeping sickness (Trypanosoma brucei) and Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi) in humans. Much of our knowledge about trypanosome host-parasite relationships and life histories has come from these two human pathogens. Recent investigations into the diversity and life histories of wildlife trypanosomes in Australia highlight that there exists a great degree of biological and behavioural variation within and between trypanosomes...
2017: Advances in Parasitology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324231/occurrence-and-virulence-properties-of-vibrio-and-salinivibrio-isolates-from-tropical-lagoons-of-the-southern-caribbean-sea
#14
Milagro Fernández-Delgado, Paula Suárez, Sandra Giner, Virginia Sanz, Jessy Peña, Damarys Sánchez, M Alexandra García-Amado
The Vibrionaceae are Gram-negative bacteria present in marine and estuarine environments worldwide, including several species known as important pathogens to humans and aquatic organisms. The aim of this research was to investigate the occurrence and virulence properties of Vibrio and Salinivibrio isolated from lagoons at Cuare Wildlife Refuge and Margarita Island in the southern Caribbean Sea. Water, plankton and oyster samples were collected during October 2011 and March 2012 and examined by specific PCR and culture methods...
March 21, 2017: Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28323562/corynebacterium-pseudotuberculosis-infection-in-patagonian-huemul-hippocamelus-bisulcus
#15
Nelly Morales, Dennis Aldridge, Andrea Bahamonde, Julio Cerda, Claudio Araya, Rodrigo Muñoz, María Esther Saldías, Claudio Lecocq, Marcela Fresno, Pedro Abalos, Patricio Retamal
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is an intracellular bacteria and the etiologic agent of caseous lymphadenitis in domestic and wildlife species. We report C. pseudotuberculosis infection in Patagonian huemul ( Hippocamelus bisulcus ) from the Cerro Castillo National Reserve, Region of Aysen, Chile. Subcutaneous abscesses in the abdominal and pectoral regions from two animals were sampled and bacteriologic isolation was performed. In both cases, we isolated a C. pseudotuberculosis strain belonging to the ovine genotype...
March 21, 2017: Journal of Wildlife Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28323544/host-diet-affects-the-morphology-of-a-butterfly-parasite
#16
Kevin Ming-Kong Hoang, Leiling Tao, Jacobus C de Roode, Mark D Hunter
Understanding host-parasite interactions is essential for ecological research, wildlife conservation and health management. While most studies focus on numerical traits of parasite groups, such as changes in parasite load, less focus is placed on the traits of individual parasites, such as parasite size and shape (parasite morphology). Parasite morphology has significant effects on parasite fitness, such as initial colonization of hosts, avoidance of host immune defenses, and the availability of resources for parasite replication...
March 21, 2017: Journal of Parasitology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28323070/urbanization-and-the-dynamics-of-rna-viruses-in-mallards-anas-platyrhynchos
#17
Michelle Wille, Kristine Lindqvist, Shaman Muradrasoli, Björn Olsen, Josef D Järhult
Urbanization is intensifying worldwide, and affects the epidemiology of infectious diseases. However, the effect of urbanization on natural host-pathogen systems remains poorly understood. Urban ducks occupy an interesting niche in that they directly interact with both humans and wild migratory birds, and either directly or indirectly with food production birds. Here we have collected samples from Mallards residing in a pond in central Uppsala, Sweden, from January 2013 to January 2014. This artificial pond is kept ice-free during the winter months, and is a popular location where the ducks are fed, resulting in a resident population of ducks year-round...
March 17, 2017: Infection, Genetics and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28319012/the-expanding-world-of-human-leishmaniasis
#18
James A Cotton
New Leishmania isolates form a novel group of human parasites related to Leishmania enrietti, with cases in Ghana, Thailand, and Martinique; other relatives infect Australian and South American wildlife. These parasites apparently cause both cutaneous and visceral disease, and may have evolved a novel transmission mechanism exploiting blood-feeding midges.
March 16, 2017: Trends in Parasitology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318825/riparian-erosion-vulnerability-model-based-on-environmental-features
#19
Alejandra Botero-Acosta, Maria L Chu, Jorge A Guzman, Patrick J Starks, Daniel N Moriasi
Riparian erosion is one of the major causes of sediment and contaminant load to streams, degradation of riparian wildlife habitats, and land loss hazards. Land and soil management practices are implemented as conservation and restoration measures to mitigate the environmental problems brought about by riparian erosion. This, however, requires the identification of vulnerable areas to soil erosion. Because of the complex interactions between the different mechanisms that govern soil erosion and the inherent uncertainties involved in quantifying these processes, assessing erosion vulnerability at the watershed scale is challenging...
March 16, 2017: Journal of Environmental Management
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318786/modulation-of-the-stress-response-in-wild-fish-is-associated-with-variation-in-dissolved-nitrate-and-nitrite
#20
Tom G Pottinger
Disruption of non-reproductive endocrine systems in wildlife by chemicals has received little attention but represents a potentially significant problem. Nitrate is a major anthropogenic contaminant in the freshwater aquatic environment and has been identified as a potential disrupter of endocrine function in aquatic animals. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between the function of the neuroendocrine stress axis in fish and inorganic N loading along reaches of rivers receiving cumulative point source and diffuse chemical inputs...
March 15, 2017: Environmental Pollution
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