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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29872187/the-invasive-snail-that-fooled-zoologists
#1
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2018: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29690206/a-review-of-paul-lassenius-kramp-s-hydrozoan-types-taxonomic-status-location-and-condition-of-the-material-and-a-biography-of-the-danish-zoologist
#2
Cinzia Gravili, Laura Pavesi, Ferdinando Boero, Ole S Tendal
During his scientific career, largely from 1910-1970, the Danish cnidarian specialist P.L. Kramp authored 94 scientific papers, and more than 30 other kinds of publications, such as reports and popular articles. Kramp was affiliated with the marine department of the Zoological Museum of the University of Copenhagen (now: The Natural History Museum of Denmark, NHMD), an institution intensely involved at the time in expeditions, in the assembling and maintenance of collections, and in the revision of a wide range of animal groups...
April 9, 2018: Zootaxa
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29604681/measuring-vocal-difference-in-bird-population-pairs
#3
Colm O'Reilly, Kangkuso Analuddin, David J Kelly, Naomi Harte
Over time, a bird population's acoustic and morphological features can diverge from the parent species. A quantitative measure of difference between two populations of species/subspecies is extremely useful to zoologists. Work in this paper takes a dialect difference system first developed for speech and refines it to automatically measure vocalisation difference between bird populations by extracting pitch contours. The pitch contours are transposed into pitch codes. A variety of codebook schemes are proposed to represent the contour structure, including a vector quantization approach...
March 2018: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29523744/imagining-life-without-dreamer
#4
(no author information available yet)
Dr Naomi Harvey , a zoologist, describes how she has learnt to deal with her anticipatory grief.
March 10, 2018: Veterinary Record
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29501788/50-years-of-comparative-biochemistry-the-legacy-of-peter-hochachka
#5
L T Buck, G Burness, K L Campbell, C-A Darveau, W Driedzic, H Guderley, G B McClelland, T W Moon, C D Moyes, P M Schulte
Peter Hochachka was an early pioneer in the field of comparative biochemistry. He passed away in 2002 after 4 decades of research in the discipline. To celebrate his contributions and to coincide with what would have been his 80th birthday, a group of his former students organized a symposium that ran as a satellite to the 2017 Canadian Society of Zoologists annual meeting in Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). This Special Issue of CBP brings together manuscripts from symposium attendees and other authors who recognize the role Peter played in the evolution of the discipline...
February 28, 2018: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part B, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29391153/an-historical-note-on-the-cell-theory
#6
REVIEW
Domenico Ribatti
The development of the microscope was a precondition for the discovery of cells. This instrument magnifies objects too small to be seen by the naked eye. In 1673, the Dutch botanist, Anton van Leeuwenhoek, made a more advanced microscope and reported seeing a myriad of microscopic "animalcules" in water. He also made further studies of red blood cells and sperm cells. Most studies that followed were done on the easily studied plant tissues. Plant cells, rigidly encased in their cell walls, were ideal to study in situ...
March 1, 2018: Experimental Cell Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29332935/novel-treatment-strategies-for-chronic-kidney-disease-insights-from-the-animal-kingdom
#7
REVIEW
Peter Stenvinkel, Johanna Painer, Makoto Kuro-O, Miguel Lanaspa, Walter Arnold, Thomas Ruf, Paul G Shiels, Richard J Johnson
Many of the >2 million animal species that inhabit Earth have developed survival mechanisms that aid in the prevention of obesity, kidney disease, starvation, dehydration and vascular ageing; however, some animals remain susceptible to these complications. Domestic and captive wild felids, for example, show susceptibility to chronic kidney disease (CKD), potentially linked to the high protein intake of these animals. By contrast, naked mole rats are a model of longevity and are protected from extreme environmental conditions through mechanisms that provide resistance to oxidative stress...
April 2018: Nature Reviews. Nephrology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29316302/oxygen-supply-did-not-affect-how-lizards-responded-to-thermal-stress
#8
Agustin Camacho Guerrero, John M VandenBrooks, Angela Riley, Rory S Telemeco, Michael J Angilletta
Zoologists rely on mechanistic niche models of behavioral thermoregulation to understand how animals respond to climate change. These models predict that species will need to disperse to higher altitudes to persist in a warmer world. However, thermal stress and thus thermoregulatory behavior may depend on atmospheric oxygen as well as environmental temperatures. Severe hypoxia causes animals to prefer lower body temperatures, which could be interpreted as evidence that oxygen supply limits heat tolerance. Such a constraint could prevent animals from successfully dispersing to high elevations during climate change...
January 9, 2018: Integrative Zoology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29277272/classics-revisited-miguel-fern%C3%A3-ndez-on-germ-layer-inversion-and-specific-polyembryony-in-armadillos
#9
REVIEW
A M Carter
BACKGROUND: Miguel Fernández was an Argentinian zoologist who published the first account of obligate polyembryony in armadillos. His contribution is here discussed in relation to his contemporaries, Newman and Patterson, and more recent work. FINDINGS: Fernandez worked on the mulita (Dasypus hybridus). He was able to get early stages before twinning occurred and show it was preceded by inversion of the germ layers. By the primitive streak stage there were separate embryonic shields and partition of the amnion...
January 2018: Placenta
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29126995/fvd-the-fish-associated-virus-database
#10
Yaxin Chen, Mijuan Shi, Yingyin Cheng, Wanting Zhang, Qin Tang, Xiao-Qin Xia
With the expanding of marine and freshwater aquaculture, the outbreaks of aquatic animal diseases have increasingly become the major threats to the healthy development of aquaculture industries. Notably, viral infections lead to massive fish deaths and result in great economic loss every year across the world. Hence, it is meaningful to clarify the biodiversity, geographical distribution and host specificity of fish-associated viruses. In this study, viral sequences detected in fish samples were manually collected from public resources, along with the related metadata, such as sampling time, location, specimen type and fish species...
March 2018: Infection, Genetics and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28814607/early-career-researchers-an-interview-with-graham-scott
#11
(no author information available yet)
Graham Scott is an Assistant Professor at McMaster University, Canada, where he studies the integrative biology of how animals cope in challenging environments. He received his Bachelor's degree in biology before completing a Master's degree with Trish Schulte and then a PhD in 2009 with Bill Milsom at the University of British Columbia, Canada. He moved on to continue his postdoc training with Ian Johnston at the University of St Andrews, UK. Scott received the Animal Section Presidents' Medal from the Society for Experimental Biology in 2012, he was an author on the Journal of Zoology Paper of the Year in 2015 and he was awarded the Robert G...
August 15, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28721604/a-space-of-one-s-own-barbosa-du-bocage-the-foundation-of-the-national-museum-of-lisbon-and-the-construction-of-a-career-in-zoology-1851-1907
#12
Daniel Gamito-Marques
This paper discusses the life and scientific work of José Vicente Barbosa du Bocage (1823-1907), a nineteenth-century Portuguese naturalist who carved a new place for zoological research in Portugal and built up a prestigious scientific career by securing appropriate physical and institutional spaces to the discipline. Although he was appointed professor of zoology at the Lisbon Polytechnic School, an institution mainly devoted to the preparatory training of military officers and engineers, he succeeded in creating the conditions that allowed him to develop consistent research in zoology at this institution...
June 2018: Journal of the History of Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28669417/st-george-mivart-as-popularizer-of-zoology-in-britain-and-america-1869-1881
#13
Emma E Swain
Recent scholarly attentions have shifted from key actors within the scientific elite and religious authorities to scientific practitioners and popularizers who used science to pursue a wide variety of cultural purposes. The Roman Catholic zoologist St. George Mivart (1827-1900) has typically been cast as a staunch anti-Darwinian ostracized by Darwin's inner circle of scientific naturalists. Understood as a popularizer of science, his position can be re-thought. Mivart did not operate on the periphery of Victorian science...
December 2017: Endeavour
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28533016/drodvir-a-resource-for-exploring-the-virome-diversity-in-rodents
#14
Lihong Chen, Bo Liu, Zhiqiang Wu, Qi Jin, Jian Yang
Emerging zoonotic diseases have received tremendous interests in recent years, as they pose a significant threat to human health, animal welfare, and economic stability. A high proportion of zoonoses originate from wildlife reservoirs. Rodents are the most numerous, widespread, and diverse group of mammals on the earth and are reservoirs for many zoonotic viruses responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. A better understanding of virome diversity in rodents would be of importance for researchers and professionals in the field...
May 20, 2017: Journal of Genetics and Genomics, Yi Chuan Xue Bao
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28183129/the-type-localities-of-i-anolis-i-i-aequatorialis-i-werner-1894-sauria-iguania-dactyloidae-and-i-pristimantis-i-i-appendiculatus-i-werner-1894-amphibia-anura-craugastoridae
#15
Diego F Cisneros-Heredia
The eminent Austrian zoologist Franz Werner described several new species of amphibians and reptiles from America, including Anolis aequatorialis Werner, 1894 and Hylodes appendiculatus Werner, 1894. Both species were described based on single specimens, with no more specific type localities than "Ecuador" (Werner 1894a,b). After its description, A. aequatorialis remained unreported until Peters (1967) and Fitch et al. (1976) published information on its distribution and natural history. Anolis aequatorialis is currently known to inhabit low montane and cloud forest on the western slopes of the Andes from extreme southern Colombia to central Ecuador, between 1300 and 2300 m elevation (Ayala-Varela & Velasco 2010; Ayala-Varela et al...
January 4, 2017: Zootaxa
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28065652/the-first-darwinian-phylogenetic-tree-of-plants
#16
Uwe Hoßfeld, Elizabeth Watts, Georgy S Levit
In 1866, the German zoologist Ernst Haeckel (1834-1919) published the first Darwinian trees of life in the history of biology in his book General Morphology of Organisms. We take a specific look at the first phylogenetic trees for the plant kingdom that Haeckel created as part of this two-volume work.
February 2017: Trends in Plant Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27910006/william-d-hamilton-s-brazilian-lectures-and-his-unpublished-model-regarding-wynne-edwards-s-idea-of-natural-selection-with-a-note-on-pluralism-and-different-philosophical-approaches-to-evolution
#17
Emanuele Coco
In 1975, the English evolutionist William Donald Hamilton (1936-2000) held in Brazil a series of lectures entitled "Population genetics and social behaviour". The unpublished notes of these conferences-written by Hamilton and recently discovered at the British Library-offer an opportunity to reflect on some of the author's ideas about evolution. The year of the conference is particularly significant, as it took place shortly after the applications of the Price equation with which Hamilton was able to build a model that included several levels of selection...
December 2016: History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27621029/integrative-zoology-2006-2016-a-decade-of-substantial-achievement
#18
EDITORIAL
John S Buckeridge
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2016: Integrative Zoology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27552382/local-endemism-and-within-island-diversification-of-shrews-illustrate-the-importance-of-speciation-in-building-sundaland-mammal-diversity
#19
Terrence C Demos, Anang S Achmadi, Thomas C Giarla, Heru Handika, Maharadatunkamsi, Kevin C Rowe, Jacob A Esselstyn
Island systems are important models for evolutionary biology because they provide convenient, discrete biogeographic units of study. Continental islands with a history of intermittent dry land connections confound the discrete definitions of islands and have led zoologists to predict (1) little differentiation of terrestrial organisms among continental shelf islands and (2) extinction, rather than speciation, to be the main cause of differences in community composition among islands. However, few continental island systems have been subjected to well-sampled phylogeographic studies, leaving these biogeographic assumptions of connectivity largely untested...
August 23, 2016: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27515618/scolopendromorpha-of-new-guinea-and-adjacent-islands-myriapoda-chilopoda
#20
Arkady A Schileyko, Pavel E Stoev
The centipede fauna of the second largest island in the world, New Guinea, and its adjacent islands, is poorly known, with most information deriving from the first half of the 20<sup>th</sup> century. Here we present new data on the order Scolopendromorpha based on material collected in the area in the last 40 years, mainly by Bulgarian and Latvian zoologists. The collections comprise eleven species of six genera and three families. The diagnosis of Cryptops (Trigonocryptops) is emended in the light of the recent findings...
August 4, 2016: Zootaxa
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