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Learner feedback

Matthew W Zackoff, Camille Graham, Denise Warrick, Kathleen Pulda, Craig Gosdin, Blair Simpson, Jessica Marischen, Paul Bunch, Michael Vossmeyer, Grant M Mussman
OBJECTIVES: During hospital admission, communication between primary care physicians (PCPs) and hospital medicine (HM) physicians provides an opportunity for collaboration. Two-way communication facilitates collaboration by allowing the receiver to ask and respond to questions. At our institution, most HM-to-PCP communication occurred by telephone call after discharge. Our specific aim was to increase the percentage of patients for whom a telephone conversation occurred between HM and PCPs during hospital admission from 40% to >80%...
March 20, 2018: Hospital Pediatrics
Cécile J Ravesloot, Anouk van der Gijp, Marieke F van der Schaaf, Josephine C B M Huige, Olle Ten Cate, Koen L Vincken, Christian P Mol, Jan P J van Schaik
BACKGROUND: Misinterpretation of medical images is an important source of diagnostic error. Errors can occur in different phases of the diagnostic process. Insight in the error types made by learners is crucial for training and giving effective feedback. Most diagnostic skill tests however penalize diagnostic mistakes without an eye for the diagnostic process and the type of error. A radiology test with stepwise reasoning questions was used to distinguish error types in the visual diagnostic process...
June 27, 2017: Diagnosis
Urvish Joshi, Sheetal Vyas
Background and Objectives: Current programs in medical education technology concentrate mainly upon "how-to-teach." The focus is needed on learner's memory retention too. An innovative strategy like concept mapping might be a way forward. The study was carried out to assess its effectiveness and to know students' perceptions. Materials and Methods: During community medicine classes, a student-group was sensitized on how to make and use concept maps out of taught contents...
January 2018: Indian Journal of Community Medicine
Patrick G Chan, Lara W Schaheen, Ernest G Chan, Chris C Cook, James D Luketich, Jonathan D'Cunha
OBJECTIVE: Transitioning from medical school and general surgery training to cardiothoracic (CT) surgical training poses unique challenges for trainees and patient care. We hypothesized that participation in technology-enhanced simulation modules that provided early exposure to urgent/emergent CT patient problems would improve cognitive skills and readiness to manage common urgencies/emergencies. DESIGN: Traditional and integrated cardiothoracic residents at our institution participated in a technology-enhanced simulation curriculum...
March 9, 2018: Journal of Surgical Education
Cees van der Vleuten, Adrian Freeman, Carlos Fernando Collares
This paper discusses the advantages of progress testing. A utopia is described where medical schools would work together to develop and administer progress testing. This would lead to a significant reduction of cost, an increase in the quality of measurement and phenomenal feedback to learner and school. Progress testing would also provide more freedom and resources for more creative in-school assessment. It would be an educationally attractive alternative for the creation of cognitive licensing exams. A utopia is always far away in the future, but by formulating a vision for that future we may engage in discussions on how to get there...
March 9, 2018: Perspectives on Medical Education
Judith Brenner, Jeffrey Bird, Samara B Ginzburg, Thomas Kwiatkowski, Vincent Papasodero, William Rennie, Elisabeth Schlegel, Olle Ten Cate, Joanne M Willey
BACKGROUND: Two dominant themes face medical education: developing integrated curricula and improving the undergraduate medical education (UME) to graduate medical education (GME) transition. An innovative solution to both of these challenges at the Zucker School of Medicine has been the application of the cognitive apprenticeship framework in requiring emergency medical technician (EMT) certification during the first course in medical school as the core on which to build an integrated curriculum and provide entrustable clinical skills...
March 8, 2018: Medical Teacher
Jessica M Goldonowicz, Michael S Runyon, Mark J Bullard
BACKGROUND: To investigate the value of a novel simulation-based palliative care educational intervention within an emergency medicine (EM) residency curriculum. METHODS: A palliative care scenario was designed and implemented in the simulation program at an urban academic emergency department (ED) with a 3-year EM residency program. EM residents attended one of eight high-fidelity simulation sessions, in groups of 5-6. A standardized participant portrayed the patient's family member...
March 7, 2018: BMC Palliative Care
Robert A Nash, Naomi E Winstone, Samantha E A Gregory, Emily Papps
People frequently receive performance feedback that describes how well they achieved in the past, and how they could improve in future. In educational contexts, future-oriented (directive) feedback is often argued to be more valuable to learners than past-oriented (evaluative) feedback; critically, prior research led us to predict that it should also be better remembered. We tested this prediction in six experiments. Subjects read written feedback containing evaluative and directive comments, which supposedly related to essays they had previously written (Experiments 1-2), or to essays another person had written (Experiments 3-6)...
March 5, 2018: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition
Joel Bierer, Eustatiu Memu, Robert Leeper, Dalilah Fortin, Eric Fréchette, Richard Inculet, Richard Malthaner
BACKGROUND: Our vision was to develop an inexpensive training simulation in a functional operating room (in-situ) that included surgical trainees, nursing and anesthesia staff to focus on effective interprofessional communication and teamwork skills. METHODS: The simulation scenario revolved around a post-pneumonectomy airway obstruction by residual tumor. This model included our thoracic operating room with patient status displayed by an open access vital sign simulator and a reversibly modified Laerdal® airway mannequin...
February 27, 2018: Annals of Thoracic Surgery
Inga Hege, Andrzej A Kononowicz, Norman B Berman, Benedikt Lenzer, Jan Kiesewetter
Background: Clinical reasoning is a complex skill students have to acquire during their education. For educators it is difficult to explain their reasoning to students, because it is partly an automatic and unconscious process. Virtual Patients (VPs) are used to support the acquisition of clinical reasoning skills in healthcare education. However, until now it remains unclear which features or settings of VPs optimally foster clinical reasoning. Therefore, our aims were to identify key concepts of the clinical reasoning process in a qualitative approach and draw conclusions on how each concept can be enhanced to advance the learning of clinical reasoning with virtual patients...
2018: GMS Journal for Medical Education
Larry D Gruppen, Olle Ten Cate, Lorelei A Lingard, Pim W Teunissen, Jennifer R Kogan
Competency-based, time-variable medical education has reshaped the perceptions and practices of teachers, curriculum designers, faculty developers, clinician educators, and program administrators. This increasingly popular approach highlights the fact that learning among different individuals varies in duration, foundation, and goal. Time variability places particular demands on the assessment data that are so necessary for making decisions about learner progress. These decisions may be formative (e.g., feedback for improvement) or summative (e...
March 2018: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Robert Englander, Carol Carraccio
The paradigm shift to competency-based medical education (CBME) is under way, but incomplete implementation is blunting the potential impact on learning and patient outcomes. The fundamental principles of CBME call for standardizing outcomes addressing population health needs, then allowing time-variable progression to achieving them. Operationalizing CBME principles requires continuity within and across phases of the education, training, and practice continuum. However, the piecemeal origin of the phases of the "continuum" has resulted in a sequence of undergraduate to graduate medical education to practice that may be continuous temporally but bears none of the integration of a true continuum...
March 2018: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
AnnaMarie Connolly, Alice Goepfert, Anita Blanchard, Elizabeth Buys, Nicole Donnellan, Cindy L Amundsen, Shelley L Galvin, Kimberly Kenton
Background : Few tools currently exist for effective, accessible delivery of real-time, workplace feedback in the clinical setting. Objective : We developed and implemented a real-time, web-based tool for performance-based feedback in the clinical environment. Methods : The tool (myTIPreport) was designed for performance-based feedback to learners on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Milestones and procedural skills...
February 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
Sarah J Anderson, Kent G Hecker, Olave E Krigolson, Heather A Jamniczky
In anatomy education, a key hurdle to engaging in higher-level discussion in the classroom is recognizing and understanding the extensive terminology used to identify and describe anatomical structures. Given the time-limited classroom environment, seeking methods to impart this foundational knowledge to students in an efficient manner is essential. Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) methods incorporate pre-class exercises (typically online) meant to establish foundational knowledge in novice learners so subsequent instructor-led sessions can focus on deeper, more complex concepts...
2018: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Natalia Suárez, Carmen R Sánchez, Juan E Jiménez, M Teresa Anguera
The main goal of this study was to analyze whether primary teachers use evidence-based reading instruction for primary-grade readers. The study sample consisted of six teachers whose teaching was recorded. The observation instrument used was developed ad hoc for this study. The recording instrument used was Match Vision Studio. The data analysis was performed using SAS, GT version 2.0 E, and THEME. The results indicated that the teaching practices used most frequently and for the longest duration were: feedback (i...
2018: Frontiers in Psychology
Septimiu D Murgu, Jonathan S Kurman, Omar Hasan
Bronchoscopy programs implementing the experiential learning model address different learning styles. Problem-based learning improves knowledge retention, critical decision making, and communication. These modalities are preferred by learners and contribute to their engagement, in turn leading to durable learning. Follow-up after live events is warranted through spaced education strategies. The objectives of this article are to (1) summarize and illustrate the implementation of experiential learning theory for bronchoscopy courses, (2) discuss the flipped classroom model and problem-based learning, (3) illustrate bronchoscopy checklists implementation in simulation, and (4) discuss the importance of feedback and spaced learning for bronchoscopy education programs...
March 2018: Clinics in Chest Medicine
Subha Ramani, Karen D Könings, Shiphra Ginsburg, Cees P M van der Vleuten
Feedback in medical education has traditionally showcased techniques and skills of giving feedback, and models used in staff development have focused on feedback providers (teachers) not receivers (learners). More recent definitions have questioned this approach, arguing that the impact of feedback lies in learner acceptance and assimilation of feedback with improvement in practice and professional growth. Over the last decade, research findings have emphasized that feedback conversations are complex interpersonal interactions influenced by a multitude of sociocultural factors...
February 7, 2018: Medical Teacher
Florence H Sheehan, R Eugene Zierler
Healthcare providers who use peripheral vascular and cardiac ultrasound require specialized training to develop the technical and interpretive skills necessary to perform accurate diagnostic tests. Assessment of competence is a critical component of training that documents a learner's progress and is a requirement for competency-based medical education (CBME) as well as specialty certification or credentialing. The use of simulation for CBME in diagnostic ultrasound is particularly appealing since it incorporates both the psychomotor and cognitive domains while eliminating dependency on the availability of live patients with a range of pathology...
February 1, 2018: Vascular Medicine
Chueh-Fen Lu, Shu-Mei Wu, Ying-Mei Shu, Mei-Yu Yeh
Attending lectures and reading are two common approaches to acquiring knowledge, while repetitive practice is a common approach to acquiring skills. Nurturing proper attitudes in students is one of the greatest challenges for educators. Health professionals must incorporate empathy into their practice. Creative teaching strategies may offer a feasible approach to enhancing empathy-related competence. The present article focuses on analyzing current, empathy-related curriculums in nursing education in Taiwan, exploring the concepts of empathy and game-based learning, presenting the development of an empathy board game as a teaching aid, and, finally, evaluating the developed education application...
February 2018: Hu Li za Zhi the Journal of Nursing
Ariel Kate Dubin, Danielle Julian, Alyssa Tanaka, Patricia Mattingly, Roger Smith
BACKGROUND: Surgical education relies heavily upon simulation. Assessment tools include robotic simulator assessments and Global Evaluative Assessment of Robotic Skills (GEARS) metrics, which have been validated. Training programs use GEARS for proficiency testing; however, it requires a trained human evaluator. Due to limited time, learners are reliant on surgical simulator feedback to improve their skills. GEARS and simulator scores have been shown to be correlated but in what capacity is unknown...
February 5, 2018: Surgical Endoscopy
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