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vegetables and cardiovascular disease

Petra Rust, Cem Ekmekcioglu
Excessive dietary salt (sodium chloride) intake is associated with an increased risk for hypertension, which in turn is especially a major risk factor for stroke and other cardiovascular pathologies, but also kidney diseases. Besides, high salt intake or preference for salty food is discussed to be positive associated with stomach cancer, and according to recent studies probably also obesity risk. On the other hand a reduction of dietary salt intake leads to a considerable reduction in blood pressure, especially in hypertensive patients but to a lesser extent also in normotensives as several meta-analyses of interventional studies have shown...
October 19, 2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
John J B Anderson, David C Nieman
The Mediterranean diet is upheld in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines as an example of an eating pattern that promotes good health, a healthy body weight, and disease prevention throughout the lifespan. The Mediterranean eating pattern is based on a variety of unprocessed plant foods including fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds that are high in polyphenols. The majority of polyphenols arrive in the colon where bacteria degrade them into smaller phenolics that can be translocated via the portal vein to the liver...
October 14, 2016: Nutrients
Qaisar Raza, Mary Nicolaou, Henriëtte Dijkshoorn, Jacob C Seidell
OBJECTIVE: South Asians living in Western countries have shown higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease and related non-communicable diseases as compared to the local populations. The aim of this study was to compare the general health status and prevalence of myocardial infarction (MI), diabetes, high blood pressure, overweight, obesity, and fruit and vegetable intake between Pakistani immigrants in the Netherlands and local Amsterdam population. DESIGN: A health survey was conducted in 2012-2013 among Pakistanis in the Netherlands...
October 17, 2016: Ethnicity & Health
Dariusz Nowak, Michał Gośliński, Artur Szwengiel
BACKGROUND: A diet rich in fruit, vegetables and juices is associated with health benefit and reduced risk of certain civilization diseases. Antioxidant properties depend mainly on the total content of polyphenols and their composition. The aim of this study was to perform a multidimensional comparative analysis of phenolic compounds of organic juices with high antioxidant capacity (chokeberry, elderberry, cranberry, pomegranate). RESULTS: All the analyzed juices were a rich source of phenolic compounds...
October 14, 2016: Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
Noman Ahmed Jang Khan, Masroor A Khan, Guillermo Juan Morell Chardon
End stage renal disease has a list of consequences, cardiovascular being the most common. Inefficient dialysis can cause significant deposition of calcium all over the body, including heart valves making heart function impaired. We illustrate a case of 38-year-old female with end stage renal disease on peritoneal dialysis. The patient had been complaining of pain and swelling of the right hand for the last few months and had been seen by hand surgeon and was admitted electively for the biopsy of hand lesions...
2016: Case Reports in Cardiology
Mohammad Y Yakoob, Renata Micha, Shahab Khatibzadeh, Gitanjali M Singh, Peilin Shi, Habibul Ahsan, Nagalla Balakrishna, Ginnela N V Brahmam, Yu Chen, Ashkan Afshin, Saman Fahimi, Goodarz Danaei, John W Powles, Majid Ezzati, Dariush Mozaffarian
OBJECTIVES: To quantify cardiovascular disease and diabetes deaths attributable to dietary and metabolic risks by country, age, sex, and time in South Asian countries. METHODS: We used the 2010 Global Burden of Disease national surveys to characterize risk factor levels by age and sex. We derived etiological effects of risk factors-disease endpoints, by age, from meta-analyses. We defined optimal levels. We combined these inputs with cause-specific mortality rates to compute population-attributable fractions as a percentage of total cardiometabolic deaths...
October 13, 2016: American Journal of Public Health
Zoe Herreras, Montserrat Cofán, Marta Catalan, Carlos Calvo, Montserrat Pinyol, Antonio J Amor, Rosa Gilabert, Emilio Ros, Aleix Sala-Vila, Emilio Ortega
Consistent evidence supports the pro-atherogenic properties of dietary trans-fatty acids (TFAs). However, there are no clinical data on TFA intake and atheroma plaque. We cross sectionally investigated whether the proportion of total C18:1 TFA in red blood cells (RBCs), which mirrors dietary TFA intake, independently relates to carotid plaque prevalence in subjects with new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus without prior cardiovascular disease (n=101, 56% men, mean age 61 years) and age- and sex-matched controls (n=96)...
September 7, 2016: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry
Peichao Chen, Dan He, Ya Zhang, Shanshan Yang, Liujun Chen, Shengqin Wang, Huixi Zou, Zhiyong Liao, Xu Zhang, Mingjiang Wu
Aging is a complex issue, which results in a progressive decline process in cellular protection and physiological functions. Illustrating the causes of aging and pharmaceutical interference with the aging process has been a pivotal issue for thousands of years. Sargassum fusiforme (S. fusiforme), a kind of brown alga, is also named the "longevity vegetable" as it is not only a kind of food, but also used as an herb in traditional Chinese Medicine for maintaining health and treatment of thyroid disease, cardiovascular disease and so on...
October 10, 2016: Food & Function
Md Asiful Islam, Fahmida Alam, Md Solayman, Md Ibrahim Khalil, Mohammad Amjad Kamal, Siew Hua Gan
Cumulatively, degenerative disease is one of the most fatal groups of diseases, and it contributes to the mortality and poor quality of life in the world while increasing the economic burden of the sufferers. Oxidative stress and inflammation are the major pathogenic causes of degenerative diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), diabetes mellitus (DM), and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although a number of synthetic medications are used to treat these diseases, none of the current regimens are completely safe...
2016: Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Fariba Samadian, Nooshin Dalili, Ali Jamalian
Hypertension is the most important, modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality. High salt intake may predispose children to develop hypertension later. A modest reduction in population salt intake worldwide would result in a major improvement in public health. Regarding smoking as another risk factor, there are various strategies that can be used to promote smoking cessation. Physicians are in an excellent position to help their patients stop smoking. Targeted weight loss interventions in population subgroups might be more effective for the prevention of hypertension than a general-population approach...
September 2016: Iranian Journal of Kidney Diseases
Olli Hartiala, Sami Kajander, Juhani Knuuti, Heikki Ukkonen, Antti Saraste, Irina Rinta-Kiikka, Sakari Kainulainen, Mika Kähönen, Nina Hutri-Kähönen, Tomi Laitinen, Terho Lehtimäki, Jorma S A Viikari, Jaakko Hartiala, Markus Juonala, Olli T Raitakari, Costan G Magnussen
BACKGROUND: Risk factors measured in early life have been shown to predict coronary artery calcium (CAC) in adulthood. However, limited data exist on when risk factor profiles of those who develop CAC diverge from those who do not. We investigated the associations of coronary heart disease risk factor trajectories beginning in adolescence and CAC measured at middle-age. METHODS: CAC was measured among 589 participants aged 39-45years in whom cardiovascular risk factors (serum lipids, blood pressure, body mass index, physical activity, smoking habits, and fruit, vegetable, fish, and butter intake) had been collected in 1980, 1983, 1986, 2001, and 2007 as part of the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study...
September 28, 2016: International Journal of Cardiology
Thea Magrone, Emilio Jirillo
Cigarette smoke (CS) accounts for the outcome of several pathologies, even including lung cancer, cardiovascular disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Under healthy conditions, lung immune system becomes tolerant in response to various external stimuli. CS exposure alters the pulmonary immune equilibrium, thus leading to a condition of hyper activation of the local innate and adaptive immunity. COPD is one of the major complications of chronic CS exposure where a pro-inflammatory profile of the pulmonary and systemic immunity is predominant...
September 27, 2016: Endocrine, Metabolic & Immune Disorders Drug Targets
Harish C Pal, Ross L Pearlman, Farrukh Afaq
Chronic inflammation is a prolonged and dysregulated immune response leading to a wide variety of physiological and pathological conditions such as neurological abnormalities, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, obesity, pulmonary diseases, immunological diseases, cancers, and other life-threatening conditions. Therefore, inhibition of persistent inflammation will reduce the risk of inflammation-associated chronic diseases. Inflammation-related chronic diseases require chronic treatment without side effects...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Barbara Licznerska, Wanda Baer-Dubowska
Indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a common phytochemical in cruciferous vegetables, and its condensation product, 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) exert several biological activities on cellular and molecular levels, which contribute to their well-recognized chemoprevention potential. Initially, these compounds were classified as blocking agents that increase drug-metabolizing enzyme activity. Now it is widely accepted that I3C and DIM affect multiple signaling pathways and target molecules controlling cell division, apoptosis, or angiogenesis deregulated in cancer cells...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Chizuko Maruyama, Rena Nakano, Mitsuha Shima, Asumi Mae, Yuri Shijo, Eri Nakamura, Yuuna Okabe, Sunmi Park, Noriko Kameyama, Satomi Hirai, Mamoru Nakanishi, Kagehiro Uchida, Hiroshi Nishiyama
AIM: We conducted a pilot study to clarify the effects of the Japan Diet nutritional education program on metabolic risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in middle-aged men who were brought up in the westernized dietary environment of modern Japan. METHODS: Thirty-three men, 30-49 years of age, attended a nutrition education class to learn food items and recommended volumes comprising the Japan Diet (more fish, soybeans and soy products, vegetables, seaweed, mushrooms and unrefined cereals, and less animal fat, meat and poultry with fat, sweets, desserts and snacks, and alcoholic drinks), and were encouraged to consume the Japan Diet for 6 weeks...
September 21, 2016: Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis
Peter L Zock, Wendy A M Blom, Joyce A Nettleton, Gerard Hornstra
Dietary fats have important effects on the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Abundant evidence shows that partial replacement of saturated fatty acids (SAFA) with unsaturated fatty acids improves the blood lipid and lipoprotein profile and reduces the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Low-fat diets high in refined carbohydrates and sugar are not effective. Very long-chain polyunsaturated n-3 or omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 VLCPUFA) present in fish have multiple beneficial metabolic effects, and regular intake of fatty fish is associated with lower risks of fatal CHD and stroke...
November 2016: Current Cardiology Reports
Alireza Milani, Marzieh Basirnejad, Sepideh Shahbazi, Azam Bolhassani
Carotenoids and retinoids have several similarities in biological activities such as antioxidant properties, the inhibition of malignant tumor growth, and the induction of apoptosis. Supplementation with carotenoids can influence cell growth regulation, and modulate gene expression and immune response. Epidemiologic studies have shown the correlation of high carotenoid intake from food sources with reduced risk of breast, cervical, ovarian, colorectal cancers, and cardiovascular or eye diseases. Cancer chemoprevention by dietary carotenoids involves some approaches including gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), growth factor signaling, cell cycle progression, differentiation-related proteins, retinoid-like receptors, antioxidant response element, nuclear receptors, AP-1 transcriptional complex, Wnt/β-Catenin pathway, and inflammatory cytokines...
September 16, 2016: British Journal of Pharmacology
Elizabeth A Baker, Ellen K Barnidge, Mario Schootman, Marjorie Sawicki, Freda L Motton-Kershaw
INTRODUCTION: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among African Americans in the U.S., with high blood pressure and obesity being two of the main determinants. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet is effective in changing behaviors associated with these health concerns, but has not been adapted to community settings. METHODS: Men on the Move: Growing Communities (MOTMGC) was evaluated using a quasi-experimental cross-sectional design...
September 12, 2016: American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Jay Thomas Sutliffe, Joel Harvey Fuhrman, Mary Jo Carnot, Raena Marie Beetham, Madison Sarah Peddy
UNLABELLED: conduct interventions for health promotion and disease prevention to ameliorate chronic risk factors for disease, such as for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Likewise, nutrient-dense, plant-rich (NDPR) dietary patterns have been shown to be effective at preventing and improving chronic-disease conditions, including CVD. Objective • The study's aim was to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of an NDPR dietary intervention for worksites to lower CVD risk factors. Design • The study was a 6-wk pilot intervention using a pretest and posttest design...
September 2016: Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine
M U Granata, F Bracco, L Gratani, R Catoni, F Corana, B Mannucci, F Sartori, E Martino
The kernel composition (moisture, ash, protein, carbohydrate, calories, fat, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids) of two hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) cultivars ('Tonda Gentile Trilobata' and 'Tonda Gentile Romana') and of two wild types growing in different climatic conditions (north-west and central Italy) was evaluated. The main kernel component was fatty acid (65.9 ± 1.8%, mean value), and the most abundant fatty acid in hazelnut was oleic acid (C18:1) (83.5 ± 1.0%, mean value). The saturated fatty acids are the minor compounds in kernel hazelnut, resulting in a unsatured fatty acid to saturated (U/S) fatty acid ratio of 9...
September 7, 2016: Natural Product Research
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