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mammographic density

Maria C Mora-Pinzon, Amy Trentham-Dietz, Ronald E Gangnon, Scott V Adams, John M Hampton, Elizabeth Burnside, Martin M Shafer, Polly A Newcomb
PURPOSE: Heavy metals and other elements may act as breast carcinogens due to estrogenic activity. We investigated associations between urine concentrations of a panel of elements and breast density. METHODS: Mammographic density categories were abstracted from radiology reports of 725 women aged 40-65 yr in the Avon Army of Women. A panel of 27 elements was quantified in urine using high resolution magnetic sector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. We applied LASSO (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) logistic regression to the 27 elements and calculated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dense vs...
March 14, 2018: Nutrition and Cancer
Stephanie Wang Zuo, Harold Wu, Wen Shen
OBJECTIVE: To examine mammographic density before and after at least 1 year of vaginal estrogen use in a small cohort of healthy postmenopausal women and women with a personal history of breast cancer. METHODS: We extracted data via chart review of patients from a single practitioner's menopause specialty clinic in Baltimore, MD. Mammographic change was primarily determined via the Bi-RADS scoring system, including the Bi-RADS density score. In addition, we conduct a narrative review of the current literature on the usage of local estrogen therapy, and systemic and local alternatives in the treatment of genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM) in breast cancer survivors...
March 12, 2018: Menopause: the Journal of the North American Menopause Society
Sadaf Alipour, Nooshin Shirzad, Mahdi Sepidarkish, Azin Saberi, Leila Bayani, Ladan Hosseini
The aim of this study was to determine the effect of supplementation with 50,000 IU/monthly vitamin D for 1 yr on breast density in Iranian women. METHODS: This double-blind, placebo-controlled, single center clinical trial was conducted among 400 women aged 40 yr and older. Participants were allocated to 2 groups. Group 1 received vitamin D (Cholecalciferol) 50,000 IU in tablet form, monthly, for 1 yr. Group 2 received vitamin E 400 IU in tablet form, monthly, for the same period of time...
March 12, 2018: Nutrition and Cancer
Jennifer D Brooks, Janice S Sung, Malcolm C Pike, Irene Orlow, Frank Z Stanczyk, Jonine L Bernstein, Elizabeth A Morris
Background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) is the degree to which normal breast tissue enhances on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI-density is a volumetric measure of breast density that is highly correlated with mammographic density, an established breast cancer risk factor. Endogenous estrogen concentrations are positively associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk and BPE has been shown to be sensitive to hormonal exposures. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between BPE and MRI-density and serum hormone concentrations in postmenopausal women...
March 9, 2018: International Journal of Cancer. Journal International du Cancer
Nina Roswall, Zorana Jovanovic Andersen, My von Euler-Chelpin, Ilse Vejborg, Elsebeth Lynge, Steen Solvang Jensen, Ole Raaschou-Nielsen, Anne Tjønneland, Mette Sørensen
OBJECTIVES: Traffic is the most important source of community noise, and it has been proposed to be associated with a range of disease outcomes, including breast cancer. As mammographic breast density (MD) is one of the strongest risk factors for developing breast cancer, the present study investigated whether there is an association between residential exposure to traffic noise and MD in a Danish cohort. METHODS: We included women with reproductive and lifestyle information available from the Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort, who also participated in the Copenhagen Mammography Screening Programme (n = 5,260)...
March 8, 2018: Cancer Causes & Control: CCC
Héctor A Velásquez García, Boris G Sobolev, Carolyn C Gotay, Christine M Wilson, Caroline A Lohrisch, Agnes S Lai, Kristan J Aronson, John J Spinelli
PURPOSE: The association between high mammographic density (MD) and elevated breast cancer risk is well established. However, the role of absolute non-dense area remains unclear. We estimated the effect of the mammographic non-dense area and other density parameters on the risk of breast cancer. METHODS: This study utilizes data from a population-based case-control study conducted in Greater Vancouver, British Columbia, with 477 female postmenopausal breast cancer cases and 588 female postmenopausal controls...
March 7, 2018: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
Norman Boyd, Hal Berman, Jie Zhu, Lisa J Martin, Martin J Yaffe, Sofia Chavez, Greg Stanisz, Greg Hislop, Anna M Chiarelli, Salomon Minkin, Andrew D Paterson
BACKGROUND: Our purpose is to develop a testable biological hypothesis to explain the known increased risk of breast cancer associated with extensive percent mammographic density (PMD), and to reconcile the apparent paradox that although PMD decreases with increasing age, breast cancer incidence increases. METHODS: We used the Moolgavkar model of carcinogenesis as a framework to examine the known biological properties of the breast tissue components associated with PMD that includes epithelium and stroma, in relation to the development of breast cancer...
March 7, 2018: Breast Cancer Research: BCR
Marzana Chowdhury, David Euhus, Maureen O'Donnell, Tracy Onega, Pankaj K Choudhary, Swati Biswas
PURPOSE: Increased mammographic breast density is a significant risk factor for breast cancer. It is not clear if it is also a risk factor for the development of contralateral breast cancer. METHODS: The data were obtained from Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium and included women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ between ages 18 and 88 and years 1995 and 2009. Each case of contralateral breast cancer was matched with three controls based on year of first breast cancer diagnosis, race, and length of follow-up...
March 6, 2018: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
Gloria Richard-Davis, Brianna Whittemore, Anthony Disher, Valerie Montgomery Rice, Rathinasamy B Lenin, Camille Dollins, Eric R Siegel, Hari Eswaran
Objective: Increased mammographic breast density is a well-established risk factor for breast cancer development, regardless of age or ethnic background. The current gold standard for categorizing breast density consists of a radiologist estimation of percent density according to the American College of Radiology (ACR) Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) criteria. This study compares paired qualitative interpretations of breast density on digital mammograms with quantitative measurement of density using Hologic's Food and Drug Administration-approved R2 Quantra volumetric breast density assessment tool...
2018: Breast Cancer: Basic and Clinical Research
Megan S Rice, Rulla M Tamimi, Kimberly A Bertrand, Christopher G Scott, Matthew R Jensen, Aaron D Norman, Daniel W Visscher, Yunn-Yi Chen, Kathleen R Brandt, Fergus J Couch, John A Shepherd, Bo Fan, Fang-Fang Wu, Lin Ma, Laura C Collins, Steven R Cummings, Karla Kerlikowske, Celine M Vachon
BACKGROUND: Though mammographic density (MD) has been proposed as an intermediate marker of breast cancer risk, few studies have examined whether the associations between breast cancer risk factors and risk are mediated by MD, particularly by tumor characteristics. METHODS: Our study population included 3392 cases (1105 premenopausal) and 8882 (3192 premenopausal) controls from four case-control studies. For established risk factors, we estimated the percent of the total risk factor association with breast cancer that was mediated by percent MD (secondarily, by dense area and non-dense area) for invasive breast cancer as well as for subtypes defined by the estrogen receptor (ER+/ER-), progesterone receptor (PR+/PR-), and HER2 (HER2+/HER2-)...
March 3, 2018: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
Aliya Alimujiang, Kellie R Imm, Catherine M Appleton, Graham A Colditz, Catherine S Berkey, Adetunji T Toriola
Although childhood adiposity is inversely associated with breast cancer risk, the association of childhood adiposity with mammographic density in premenopausal women has not been adequately studied. We analyzed data from 365 premenopausal women who came in for screening mammography at Washington University in St. Louis from 2015 to 2016. Body size at age 10 was self-reported using Somatotype pictogram. Body mass index (BMI) at age 10 was imputed using data from Growing Up Today Study. Volpara software was used to evaluate volumetric percent density (VPD), dense volume (DV) and non-dense volume (NDV)...
March 2, 2018: Cancer Prevention Research
Honor J Hugo, Aneta Zysk, Pallave Dasari, Kara Britt, John L Hopper, Jennifer Stone, Erik W Thompson, Wendy V Ingman
On a mammogram, breast density (also known as mammographic density) is shown as white and bright regions and is associated with reduced sensitivity in cancer detection and increased breast cancer risk. However, many Australian women are unaware of the significance of breast density as it is not routinely reported or discussed. In order to address this lack of knowledge, Australian breast cancer researchers with expertise in mammographic density formed the InforMD alliance (INformation FORum on Mammographic Density) in 2016...
2018: Ecancermedicalscience
Mitchell H Gail, Ruth M Pfeiffer
Background: Incorporation of polygenic risk scores and mammographic density into models to predict breast cancer incidence can increase discriminatory accuracy (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC]) from 0.6 for models based only on epidemiologic factors to 0.7. It is timely to assess what impact these improvements will have on individual counseling and on public health prevention and screening strategies, and to determine what further improvements are needed. Methods: We studied various clinical and public health applications using a log-normal distribution of risk...
February 27, 2018: Journal of the National Cancer Institute
D Joseph Jerry, James D Shull, Darryl L Hadsell, Monique Rijnkels, Karen A Dunphy, Sallie S Schneider, Laura N Vandenberg, Prabin Dhangada Majhi, Celia Byrne, Amy Trentham-Dietz
Breast cancer risk is intimately intertwined with exposure to estrogens. While more than 160 breast cancer risk loci have been identified in humans, genetic interactions with estrogen exposure remain to be established. Strains of rodents exhibit striking differences in their responses to endogenous ovarian estrogens (primarily 17β-estradiol). Similar genetic variation has been observed for synthetic estrogen agonists (ethinyl estradiol) and environmental chemicals that mimic the actions of estrogens (xenoestrogens)...
February 27, 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
Parisa Tehranifar, Carmen B Rodriguez, Ayana April-Sanders, Elise Desperito, Karen M Schmitt
BACKGROUND: Breast cancer incidence is lower in many U.S ethnic minority and foreign-born population groups. Investigating whether migration and acculturation patterns in risk are reflected in disease biomarkers may help to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. METHODS: We compared the distribution of breast cancer risk factors across U.S.-born white, African American and Hispanic women, and foreign-born Hispanic women (n=477, ages 40-64 years, 287 born in Caribbean countries)...
February 23, 2018: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Lynn Chollet-Hinton, Samantha Puvanesarajah, Rupninder Sandhu, Erin L Kirk, Bentley R Midkiff, Karthik Ghosh, Kathleen R Brandt, Christopher G Scott, Gretchen L Gierach, Mark E Sherman, Celine M Vachon, Melissa A Troester
Delayed age-related lobular involution has been previously associated with elevated breast cancer risk. However, intraindividual variability in epithelial involution status within a woman is undefined. We developed a novel measure of age-related epithelial involution, density of epithelial nuclei in epithelial areas using digital image analysis in combination with stromal characteristics (percentage of section area comprising stroma). Approximately 1800 hematoxylin and eosin stained sections of benign breast tissue were evaluated from 416 participants having breast surgery for cancer or benign conditions...
February 20, 2018: Modern Pathology: An Official Journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc
Sonja D Bahrs, Vanessa Otto, Valerie Hattermann, Bernhard Klumpp, Markus Hahn, Konstantin Nikolaou, Katja Siegmann-Luz
Background The limited sensitivity of mammography in case of a high breast density often produces unclear or false-positive findings, so-called BI-RADS 3 lesions, which have to be followed up to prove benignity. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) was developed to reduce such summation effects. Purpose To evaluate the influence of an additional DBT on the management of mammographic BI-RADS 3 findings and whether DBT can decrease the time to definitive diagnosis or not. Material and Methods We analyzed 87 patients with a mammographic non-calcified BI-RADS 3 lesion who underwent an additional DBT of the affected breast...
January 1, 2018: Acta Radiologica
K E McLean, J Stone
Mammographic breast density is an established risk factor for breast cancer and significantly reduces the sensitivity of mammography, yet its use within breast cancer screening programs in Australia is limited. We provide a contemporary snapshot of the role of breast density measurement in screening for breast cancer and review the recent evidence for an increasing role of breast density measurement as: a predictor of breast cancer risk, a predictor of 'masking', and a biomarker to monitor effectiveness of intervention strategies for primary prevention or improved breast cancer outcomes...
February 15, 2018: Climacteric: the Journal of the International Menopause Society
Sanna Byström, Martin Eklund, Mun-Gwan Hong, Claudia Fredolini, Mikael Eriksson, Kamila Czene, Per Hall, Jochen M Schwenk, Marike Gabrielson
BACKGROUND: Mammographic breast density is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer, but molecular understanding of how breast density relates to cancer risk is less complete. Studies of proteins in blood plasma, possibly associated with mammographic density, are well-suited as these allow large-scale analyses and might shed light on the association between breast cancer and breast density. METHODS: Plasma samples from 1329 women in the Swedish KARMA project, without prior history of breast cancer, were profiled with antibody suspension bead array (SBA) assays...
February 14, 2018: Breast Cancer Research: BCR
Hyuna Sung, Jiansong Ren, Jing Li, Ruth M Pfeiffer, Yong Wang, Jennifer L Guida, Yi Fang, Jufang Shi, Kai Zhang, Ni Li, Shen Wang, Luopei Wei, Nan Hu, Gretchen L Gierach, Min Dai, Xiaohong R Yang, Jie He
Elevated mammographic density (MD) is an established breast cancer risk factor. Studies examining relationships between MD and breast cancer risk factors are limited in China, where established breast cancer risk factors are less prevalent but dense breasts are more prevalent than Western countries. This study included 11,478 women (45-69 years; 36% premenopausal) participating in an ongoing national cancer screening program in 11 urban provinces in China and predicted as having high-risk for breast cancer...
2018: NPJ Breast Cancer
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