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hyperpalatable foods

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26339213/back-by-popular-demand-a-narrative-review-on-the-history-of-food-addiction-research
#1
REVIEW
Adrian Meule
In recent years, the concept of food addiction has gained more and more popularity. This approach acknowledges the apparent parallels between substance use disorders and overeating of highly palatable, high-caloric foods. Part of this discussion includes that "hyperpalatable" foods may have an addictive potential because of increased potency due to certain nutrients or additives. Although this idea seems to be relatively new, research on food addiction actually encompasses several decades, a fact that often remains unrecognized...
September 2015: Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26284304/prevalence-of-food-addiction-among-low-income-reproductive-aged-women
#2
Abbey B Berenson, Tabassum H Laz, Ali M Pohlmeier, Mahbubur Rahman, Kathryn A Cunningham
BACKGROUND: Hyperpalatable foods (i.e., high in salt, sugar, or fat) have been shown to have addictive properties that may contribute to overeating. Prior studies conducted on food addiction behaviors are mostly based on white and middle-aged women. Data are not available, however, on reproductive-aged women from other races/ethnicities or low-income women. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence and correlates of food addiction among multiethnic women of low socioeconomic status...
September 2015: Journal of Women's Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25540603/evolutionary-and-neuropsychological-perspectives-on-addictive-behaviors-and-addictive-substances-relevance-to-the-food-addiction-construct
#3
REVIEW
Caroline Davis
It has been argued that food cannot be "addictive", unlike conventional drugs of abuse, because it is an essential part of life. In this paper, evidence is reviewed, largely from an evolutionary psychobiological perspective, that plant-based psychoactive drugs (such as those derived from the opium poppy and the coca leaf) and gambling-related behaviors were once adaptive for human health and survival in a similar manner as energy-based foods were for nourishment. "Evolutionary mismatch" viewpoints contend that certain behaviors were enhanced during the hunter-gatherer lifestyle - from which our genetic endowment had its origins - because they bestowed both survival and reproductive advantages to the species...
2014: Substance Abuse and Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24126546/stress-and-eating-behaviors
#4
REVIEW
Y H C Yau, M N Potenza
Obesity is a heterogeneous construct that, despite multiple and diverse attempts, has been difficult to treat. One conceptualization gaining media and research attention in recent years is that foods, particularly hyperpalatable (e.g., high-fat, high sugar) ones, may possess addictive qualities. Stress is an important factor in the development of addiction and in addiction relapse, and may contribute to an increased risk for obesity and other metabolic diseases. Uncontrollable stress changes eating patterns and the salience and consumption of hyperpalatable foods; over time, this could lead to changes in allostatic load and trigger neurobiological adaptations that promote increasingly compulsive behavior...
September 2013: Minerva Endocrinologica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/23719144/sugar-addiction-pushing-the-drug-sugar-analogy-to-the-limit
#5
REVIEW
Serge H Ahmed, Karine Guillem, Youna Vandaele
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review research that tests the validity of the analogy between addictive drugs, like cocaine, and hyperpalatable foods, notably those high in added sugar (i.e., sucrose). RECENT FINDINGS: Available evidence in humans shows that sugar and sweetness can induce reward and craving that are comparable in magnitude to those induced by addictive drugs. Although this evidence is limited by the inherent difficulty of comparing different types of rewards and psychological experiences in humans, it is nevertheless supported by recent experimental research on sugar and sweet reward in laboratory rats...
July 2013: Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/22065960/how-prevalent-is-food-addiction
#6
Adrian Meule
Increasing evidence suggests that binge eating-related disorders could be related to addiction-like eating patterns due to the addictive potential of hyperpalatable foods. Subsequently, important implications have been derived for treatment of those disorders and even political actions. However, studies on the prevalence of food addiction are rare. Few recent studies investigated addictive eating in children, adolescents, and adults. This mini-review presents these first attempts to assess addictive eating and how prevalent addictive eating patterns were in the respective studies...
2011: Frontiers in Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/21999688/the-addiction-potential-of-hyperpalatable-foods
#7
REVIEW
Ashley N Gearhardt, Caroline Davis, Rachel Kuschner, Kelly D Brownell
Scientific interest in "food addiction" continues to grow due both to neurobiological and behavioral similarities between substance dependence and excessive food consumption. An important next step is to examine the addictive potential of highly processed foods. In this paper, we explore addiction-related changes in the modern food environment (e.g., increased potency, elevated speed of absorption), examine the historical and modern understanding of addictive substances as applied to hyperpalatable foods, and outline shared factors that increase the public health costs of both addictive drugs and certain foods...
September 2011: Current Drug Abuse Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/21635588/can-food-be-addictive-public-health-and-policy-implications
#8
Ashley N Gearhardt, Carlos M Grilo, Ralph J DiLeone, Kelly D Brownell, Marc N Potenza
AIMS: Data suggest that hyperpalatable foods may be capable of triggering an addictive process. Although the addictive potential of foods continues to be debated, important lessons learned in reducing the health and economic consequences of drug addiction may be especially useful in combating food-related problems. METHODS: In the current paper, we review the potential application of policy and public health approaches that have been effective in reducing the impact of addictive substances to food-related problems...
July 2011: Addiction
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