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Procedural sedation emergency department

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28073611/propofol-versus-midazolam-for-procedural-sedation-in-the-emergency-department-a-study-on-efficacy-and-safety
#1
Heleen Lameijer, Ytje T Sikkema, Albert Pol, Maike G E Bosch, Femke Beije, Rieneke Feenstra, Bas W J Bens, Ewoud Ter Avest
BACKGROUND: Procedural sedation for painful procedures in the emergency department (ED) can be accomplished with various pharmacological agents. The choice of the sedative used is highly dependent on procedure- and patient characteristics and on personal- or local preferences. METHODS: We conducted a multicenter retrospective cohort study of procedural sedations performed in the EDs of 5 hospitals in the Netherlands over a 4year period to evaluate the efficacy- (success rate of the intended procedure) and safety (incidence of sedation (adverse) events) of propofol sedations compared to midazolam sedations...
January 3, 2017: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28032265/using-continuous-quantitative-capnography-for-emergency-department-procedural-sedation-a-systematic-review-and-cost-effectiveness-analysis
#2
Nicholas Matthew Mohr, Andrew Stoltze, Azeemuddin Ahmed, Elizabeth Kiscaden, Dan Shane
End-tidal CO2 has been advocated to improve safety of emergency department (ED) procedural sedation by decreasing hypoxia and catastrophic outcomes. This study aimed to estimate the cost-effectiveness of routine use of continuous waveform quantitative end-tidal CO2 monitoring for ED procedural sedation in prevention of catastrophic events. Markov modeling was used to perform cost-effectiveness analysis to estimate societal costs per prevented catastrophic event (death or hypoxic brain injury) during routine ED procedural sedation...
December 28, 2016: Internal and Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27979641/awake-laryngoscopy-in-the-emergency-department
#3
Joseph E Tonna, Peter M C DeBlieux
BACKGROUND: Many emergency physicians gain familiarity with the laryngeal anatomy only during the brief view achieved during rapid sequence induction and intubation. Awake laryngoscopy in the emergency department (ED) is an important and clinically underutilized procedure. DISCUSSION: Providing benefit to the emergency physician through a slow, controlled, and deliberate examination of the airway, awake laryngoscopy facilitates confidence in the high-risk airway and eases the evolution to intubation, should it be required...
December 12, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27939800/changes-in-blood-pressure-and-heart-rate-during-sedation-with-ketamine-in-the-pediatric-ed
#4
Adam C Patterson, Shernaz A Wadia, Douglas J Lorenz, Michelle D Stevenson
BACKGROUND: Ketamine is commonly used in the emergency department for short, painful procedures. We describe changes in blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) during procedural sedation with ketamine, as these changes have not been well described in children. METHODS: We performed a secondary analysis of a prospective, observational study involving children aged 8 to 18 years who received procedural sedation with ketamine in a pediatric emergency department. Serial vital signs and sedation scores were recorded from baseline until recovery from ketamine procedural sedation...
October 11, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27933328/predictors-of-emesis-in-children-undergoing-procedural-sedation-with-intramuscular-ketamine-in-a-paediatric-emergency-department
#5
Shruthi Suryaprakash, Lai Peng Tham
INTRODUCTION: Emesis is one of the most common adverse events associated with ketamine sedation. However, the predictors of emesis have not been clearly studied among Asian children. This study aimed to determine the incidence and predictors of emesis in local children undergoing intramuscular (IM) ketamine sedation in the emergency department (ED), and identify high-risk groups(s), so that antiemetics may be administered prophylactically. METHODS: In a prospective observational study, all children requiring procedural sedation under IM ketamine in the paediatric ED between 1 April 2013 and 31 January 2015 were included...
December 9, 2016: Singapore Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27918376/reduced-length-of-stay-and-adverse-events-using-bier-block-for-forearm-fracture-reduction-in-the-pediatric-emergency-department
#6
Emmanuelle Fauteux-Lamarre, Brett Burstein, Adam Cheng, Adam Bretholz
OBJECTIVES: Forearm fractures are among the most common pediatric injuries. Procedural sedation is frequently used for analgesia during fracture reduction but requires a prolonged recovery period and can be associated with adverse events. Bier block is a safe alternative for fracture reduction analgesia. This study sought to compare Bier block and procedural sedation for forearm fracture reduction. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of patients aged 6 to 18 years, presenting with forearm fractures requiring closed reduction from June 2012 to March 2014...
January 1, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904260/sonographic-identification-of-peripheral-nerves-in-the-forearm
#7
Saundra A Jackson, Charlotte Derr, Anthony De Lucia, Marvin Harris, Zuheily Closser, Branko Miladinovic, Rahul Mhaskar, Theresa Jorgensen, Lori Green
BACKGROUND: With the growing utilization of ultrasonography in emergency medicine combined with the concern over adequate pain management in the emergency department (ED), ultrasound guidance for peripheral nerve blockade in ED is an area of increasing interest. The medical literature has multiple reports supporting the use of ultrasound guidance in peripheral nerve blocks. However, to perform a peripheral nerve block, one must first be able to reliably identify the specific nerve before the procedure...
October 2016: Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27901291/success-rate-of-pneumatic-reduction-of-intussusception-with-and-without-sedation
#8
Oren Feldman, Giora Weiser, Mona Hanna, Ori Devir, Uri Balla, David W Johnson, Eran Kozer, Itai Shavit
BACKGROUND: Pneumatic reduction of ileocolic intussusception is often performed without sedation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the success rate of pneumatic reduction of intussusception with and without sedation. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study in Israel in two tertiary care centers using a similar protocol for pneumatic reduction of intussusception. In one center, patients had pneumatic reduction of intussusception under propofol-based sedation, while in the other, patients had pneumatic reduction of intussusception without any sedation...
November 30, 2016: Paediatric Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27896323/intra-articular-lidocaine-versus-intravenous-sedative-and-analgesic-for-reduction-of-anterior-shoulder-dislocation
#9
Parvin Kashani, Fatemeh Asayesh Zarchi, Hamid Reza Hatamabadi, Abbas Afshar, Marzieh Amiri
OBJECTIVE: This prospective clinical trial was performed to compare the safety and efficiency of intra-articular lidocaine (IAL) versus intravenous sedative and analgesic (IVSA) in reduction of anterior shoulder dislocation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with anterior shoulder dislocation were randomly divided into 2 groups to receive IAL and IVSA. One group patients received an intravenous dose of 0.05 mg/kg midazolam and 1 μg/kg fentanyl, while the other group received 20 mL intra-articular lidocaine (1%)...
June 2016: Turkish Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27866507/simulation-and-web-based-learning-increases-utilization-of-bier-block-for-forearm-fracture-reduction-in-the-pediatric-emergency-department
#10
Brett Burstein, Emmanuelle Fauteux-Lamarre, Adam Cheng, Dominic Chalut, Adam Bretholz
OBJECTIVES: Bier block (BB) is a safe and effective alternative to procedural sedation for analgesia during forearm fracture reductions, yet remains infrequently used in the pediatric emergency department (PED). No standardized methods of BB training have previously been described. The objective of this study was to determine whether a multimodal instructional course increases comfort with BB and translates to increased use of this technique. METHODS: A novel interdisciplinary simulation and Web-based training course was developed to teach the use of BB for forearm fracture reduction at a tertiary PED...
November 21, 2016: CJEM
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27797871/procedural-sedation-in-the-emergency-department-by-dutch-emergency-physicians-a-prospective-multicentre-observational-study-of-1711-adults
#11
Gaël Jp Smits, Maybritt I Kuypers, Lisette Aa Mignot, Eef Pj Reijners, Erick Oskam, Karen Van Doorn, Wendy Amh Thijssen, Erik Hm Korsten
OBJECTIVE: To describe our experience performing ED procedural sedation in a country where emergency medicine (EM) is a relatively new specialty. METHODS: This is a prospective observational study of adult patients undergoing procedural sedation by emergency physicians (EPs) or EM residents in eight hospitals in the Netherlands. Data were collected on a standardised form, including patient characteristics, sedative and analgesic used, procedural success, adverse events (classified according to World SIVA) and rescue interventions...
October 21, 2016: Emergency Medicine Journal: EMJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27770490/point-of-care-ultrasound-for-diagnosis-of-abscess-in-skin-and-soft-tissue-infections
#12
Sathyaseelan Subramaniam, Jacqueline Bober, Jennifer Chao, Shahriar Zehtabchi
BACKGROUND: Traditionally, emergency department (ED) physicians rely on their clinical examination to differentiate between cellulitis and abscess when evaluating skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI). Management of an abscess requires incision and drainage, whereas cellulitis generally requires a course of antibiotics. Misdiagnosis often results in unnecessary invasive procedures, sedations (for incision and drainage in pediatric patients), or a return ED visit for failed antibiotic therapy...
November 2016: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27769614/allergic-reaction-to-ketamine-as-monotherapy-for-procedural-sedation
#13
Tammy T Nguyen, Bethany Baker, Jeffrey D Ferguson
BACKGROUND: Ketamine is a cyclohexamine derivative that acts as a noncompetitive N-methyl D-aspartate receptor antagonist. Its use for procedural sedation is recommended by national clinical policy. However, its immunogenic potential is not well documented. CASE REPORT: We report a case of allergic reaction associated with the administration of intravenous ketamine for procedural sedation in a 16-year-old male. Minutes after administration, the patient developed a morbilliform, erythematous rash that extended to the upper and lower torso and resolved with intravenous diphenhydramine...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27752600/a-survey-based-study-on-the-protocols-for-therapeutic-hypothermia-in-cardiac-arrest-patients-in-korea-focusing-on-the-differences-between-level-1-and-2-centers
#14
Tae Gwan Oh, Won Chul Cha, Ik Joon Jo, Mun Ju Kang, Dong Woo Lee
OBJECTIVE: We aimed to summarize the therapeutic hypothermia (TH) protocols used in emergency departments (EDs) in Korea and to investigate the differences between level 1 and 2 centers. METHODS: The chief residents from 56 EDs were given a structured survey containing questions on the indications for TH, methods for TH induction, maintaining, and finalizing TH treatments. The participants were divided into 2 groups based on their work place (level 1 vs. level 2 centers)...
December 2015: Clinical and Experimental Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27739142/lidocaine-pretreatment-reduces-the-discomfort-of-intranasal-midazolam-administration-a-randomized-double-blind-placebo-controlled-trial
#15
David Smith, High Cheek, Brenda Denson, Christopher M Pruitt
OBJECTIVE: Intranasal (IN) midazolam is a commonly prescribed medication for pediatric sedation and anxiolysis. One of its most frequently-encountered adverse effects is discomfort with administration. While it has been proposed that premedicating with lidocaine reduces this undesirable consequence, this combination has not been thoroughly researched. The objective of our study was to assess whether topical lidocaine lessens the discomfort associated with IN midazolam administration. METHODS: This was a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial performed in an urban, academic pediatric emergency department...
October 14, 2016: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27703817/conservative-treatment-of-carpometacarpal-dislocation-of-the-three-last-fingers
#16
Hélène Jumeau, Philippe Lechien, Florence Dupriez
Posterior carpometacarpal (CMC) dislocation is a rare condition. Treatment is usually surgical though no strict consensus can be found upon literature review. If diagnosed early and no associated fractures are found, CMC dislocation could benefit from conservative treatment comprising closed reduction and splint immobilisation. We report the case of a 26-year-old man diagnosed with a posterior dislocation of the third, fourth, and fifth CMC joints after a fall of 1.5 meters, treated by external reduction under procedural sedation and immobilisation with a cast for 6 weeks...
2016: Case Reports in Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27700005/high-flow-oxygen-in-patients-undergoing-procedural-sedation-in-the-emergency-department-a-retrospective-chart-review
#17
David Thomson, Timothy Cowan, Conrad Loten, Christina Botfield, Elizabeth Holliday, John Attia
OBJECTIVE: Hypoxia is a recognised complication of procedural sedation. This study sought to determine whether there was an association between the use of high-flow oxygen delivery by a non-rebreather (NRB) mask during ED procedural sedation and decreased rates of hypoxia when compared with alternative oxygenation methods. METHODS: Records of all procedural sedations performed over a 12 month period in an Australian tertiary ED were reviewed retrospectively. The primary outcome was whether recorded oxygen saturations fell below 90%...
October 3, 2016: Emergency Medicine Australasia: EMA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27693070/is-there-a-role-for-intravenous-subdissociative-dose-ketamine-administered-as-an-adjunct-to-opioids-or-as-a-single-agent-for-acute%C3%A2-pain-management-in-the-emergency-department
#18
Sergey Motov, Steven Rosenbaum, Gary M Vilke, Yuko Nakajima
BACKGROUND: Whether acute or chronic, emergency physicians frequently encounter patients reporting pain. It is the responsibility of the emergency physician to assess and evaluate, and if appropriate, safely and effectively reduce pain. Recently, analgesics other than opioids are being considered in an effort to provide safe alternatives for pain management in the emergency department (ED). Opioids have significant adverse effects such as respiratory depression, hypotension, and sedation, to say nothing of their potential for abuse...
December 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27673357/sedation-by-propofol-for-painful-care-procedures-at-the-end-of-life-a-pilot-study-propopal-1
#19
Jean François Ciais, Flora Tremellat, Maud Castelli-Prieto, Caroline Jestin
BACKGROUND: At the end of life, patients may feel refractory pain during care procedures although they receive appropriate analgesia. They can benefit from a short-term sedation. Propofol is used for procedural sedation in emergency or reanimation departments. It may be adapted in a palliative care unit. OBJECTIVE: The main objective was to verify whether propofol could allow us to administer care without causing major pain to patients with refractory pain at the end of life...
September 27, 2016: Journal of Palliative Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27605001/nasopharyngeal-foreign-body-triggered-by-a-blind-finger-sweep
#20
Takaaki Mori, Nobuaki Inoue
A previously healthy 1-year-old boy suddenly began choking and coughing after ingesting a coin. The child's mother attempted to extract the coin by inserting her fingers in his mouth and sweeping the oral cavity. The mother felt the object momentarily with her fingertips but was unable to retrieve it, and brought her son to a local hospital for assistance. The patient was referred to our emergency department (ED) for possible oesophageal obstruction by a foreign body based on the X-ray findings. On arrival at our ED, the child exhibited mild gagging but presented no respiratory symptoms and normal pulmonary examination...
September 7, 2016: BMJ Case Reports
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