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D Papadogiannis, A Iliadi, T G Bradley, N Silikas, G Eliades, T Eliades
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the viscoelastic properties of two experimental BPA-free and one BisGMA-based orthodontic resin composite adhesives for bonding fixed retainers. METHODS: A commercially available BisGMA-based (TXA: Transbond LR) and two bisphenol A-free experimental adhesives (EXA and EXB) were included in the study. The viscoelastic behavior of the adhesives was evaluated under static and dynamic conditions at dry and wet states and at various temperatures (21, 37, 50°C)...
October 18, 2016: Dental Materials: Official Publication of the Academy of Dental Materials
Paul J Karanicolas, Yulia Lin, Jordan Tarshis, Calvin H L Law, Natalie G Coburn, Julie Hallet, Barto Nascimento, Janusz Pawliszyn, Stuart A McCluskey
BACKGROUND: Hyperfibrinolysis may occur due to systemic inflammation or hepatic injury that occurs during liver resection. Tranexamic acid (TXA) is an antifibrinolytic agent that decreases bleeding in various settings, but has not been well studied in patients undergoing liver resection. METHODS: In this prospective, phase II trial, 18 patients undergoing major liver resection were sequentially assigned to one of three cohorts: (i) Control (no TXA); (ii) TXA Dose I - 1 g bolus followed by 1 g infusion over 8 h; (iii) TXA Dose II - 1 g bolus followed by 10 mg/kg/hr until the end of surgery...
October 17, 2016: HPB: the Official Journal of the International Hepato Pancreato Biliary Association
Zhenyang Mao, Bing Yue, You Wang, Mengning Yan, Kerong Dai
BACKGROUND: Intra-articular injection of tranexamic acid (TXA) is known to be effective in controlling blood loss after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, this method has some disadvantages, such as TXA leakage due to soft tissue release. Peri-articular injection provides an alternative to intra-articular administration of TXA. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of peri-articular injection of TXA in reducing blood loss after TKA and compare them to those of intra-articular TXA injection...
October 19, 2016: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Nicholas M Studer, Ahmad H Yassin, Donald E Keen
INTRODUCTION: The current Tactical Combat Casualty Care Guidelines recommend tranexamic acid (TXA) administration for casualties in whom massive blood transfusion is anticipated. However, despite Hextend being the recommended resuscitation fluid, the guidelines recommend against using TXA with Hextend. This appears to be due to a concern about pharmaceutical compatibility, despite the absence of a direct study of compatibility in the literature. METHODS: Two solutions of Hextend and TXA were examined for compatibility...
October 2016: Military Medicine
Yongcai Chen, Zhuo Chen, Shuo Cui, Zhiyang Li, Zhengjiang Yuan
BACKGROUND: Tranexamic acid (TXA) is an antifibrinolytic drug widely used to reduce blood loss during joint replacements, including total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, there is no final consensus regarding the composition of an optimal administration of TXA regime between topical and systemic (intravenous). The purpose of our study was to compare the efficacy of topical and intravenous (IV) regimen of TXA during TKA and THA. METHODS: Five relevant electronic online databases, PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science and Chinese Biomedical Database were systematically searched in November 2015...
October 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
Paola Friedrich, Catherine G Lam, Geetinder Kaur, Elena Itriago, Raul C Ribeiro, Ramandeep S Arora
BACKGROUND: Understanding and addressing treatment abandonment (TxA) is crucial for bridging the pediatric cancer survival gap between high-income (HIC) and low-and middle-income countries (LMC). In childhood cancer, TxA is defined as failure to start or complete curative cancer therapy and known to be a complex phenomenon. With rising interest on causes and consequences of TxA in LMC, this study aimed to establish the lay-of-the-land regarding determinants of TxA globally, perform and promote comparative research, and raise awareness on this subject...
2016: PloS One
Nils Kunze-Szikszay, Lennart A Krack, Pauline Wildenauer, Saskia Wand, Tim Heyne, Karoline Walliser, Christopher Spering, Martin Bauer, Michael Quintel, Markus Roessler
BACKGROUND: Hyperfibrinolysis (HF) is a major contributor to coagulopathy and mortality in trauma patients. This study investigated (i) the rate of HF during the pre-hospital management of patients with multiple injuries and (ii) the effects of pre-hospital tranexamic acid (TxA) administration on the coagulation system. METHODS: From 27 trauma patients with pre-hospital an estimated injury severity score (ISS) ≥16 points blood was obtained at the scene and on admission to the emergency department (ED)...
October 10, 2016: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
Miguel Ortega-Andreu, Gloria Talavera, Norma G Padilla-Eguiluz, Hanna Perez-Chrzanowska, Reyes Figueredo-Galve, Carlos E Rodriguez-Merchán, Enrique Gómez-Barrena
PURPOSE: To clarify if blood loss and transfusion requirements can be decreased in revision knee surgery through a multimodal blood loss approach with tranexamic acid (TXA). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective study was designed in 87 knees (79 patients) that received a knee revision between 2007 and 2013. To avoid heterogeneity in the surgical technique, only revisions with one single implant system were included. A treatment series of 44 knees that received TXA and other techniques in a multimodal blood loss protocol was compared to a control series of 43 knees that received neither TXA nor the rest of the multimodal blood loss protocol...
2016: Open Orthopaedics Journal
Brian Hallstrom, Bonita Singal, Mark E Cowen, Karl C Roberts, Richard E Hughes
BACKGROUND: The efficacy of tranexamic acid (TXA) in reducing blood loss and transfusion requirements in total hip and knee arthroplasty has been well established in small controlled clinical trials and meta-analyses. The purpose of the current study was to determine the risks and benefits of TXA use in routine orthopaedic surgical practice on the basis of data from a large, statewide arthroplasty registry. METHODS: From April 18, 2013, to September 30, 2014, there were 23,236 primary total knee arthroplasty cases and 11,489 primary total hip arthroplasty cases completed and registered in the Michigan Arthroplasty Registry Collaborative Quality Initiative (MARCQI)...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume
Jonathon Spanyer, Jay Patel, Eric Emberton, Langan S Smith, Arthur L Malkani
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety profiles of topical tranexamic acid (TXA) in patients undergoing elective total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with comorbid conditions precluding them from intravenous (IV) TXA use. A total of 104 patients were divided into two groups: 47 in the normal-risk group and 57 in the high-risk group, with the latter representing those with one or more risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Demographics were similar between groups, and there were no differences with regard to postoperative changes in hemoglobin (- 3...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Knee Surgery
Jessica L Churchill, Kathleen E Puca, Elizabeth Meyer, Matthew Carleton, Michael J Anderson
Multiple studies have shown tranexamic acid (TXA) to reduce blood loss and transfusion rates in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Accordingly, TXA has become a routine blood conservation agent for TKA. In contrast, ε-aminocaproic acid (EACA), a similar acting antifibrinolytic to TXA, has been less frequently used. This study evaluated whether EACA is as efficacious as TXA in reducing postoperative blood transfusion rates and compared the cost per surgery between agents. A multicenter retrospective chart review of elective unilateral TKA from April 2012 through December 2014 was performed...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Knee Surgery
Kedi Weng, Xingen Zhang, Qing Bi, Chen Zhao
OBJECTIVE: A meta-analysis was performed to investigate the effectiveness and safety of tranexamic acid (TXA) for the treatment of blood loss after a bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: Patients prepared for bilateral TKA and intervention including TXA versus placebo were comprehensively retrieved from MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and Web of Science from the time of the establishment of these databases to January 2016...
September 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
Guang Li, Tian-Wei Sun, Gan Luo, Chao Zhang
PURPOSE: Spine surgery is usually associated with large amount of blood loss and blood transfusion. Excessive blood loss may cause hypotension, inadequate oxygenation of organs, necessitate allogeneic blood transfusion, and spinal epidural hematoma formation. Aprotinin, TXA, and EACA are antifibrinolytics currently offered as prophylactic agents to reduce surgery-associated blood loss. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of using antifibrinolytic agents in reducing blood loss and blood transfusions in spine surgery...
September 26, 2016: European Spine Journal
Jun-Wen Wang, Bradley Chen, Po-Chun Lin, Shih-Hsiang Yen, Chung-Cheng Huang, Feng-Chih Kuo
BACKGROUND: Tranexamic acid (TXA) was reportedly to decrease postoperative blood loss after standard total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, the blood-conservation effect of TXA in minimally invasive TKA, in particular, receiving a direct oral anticoagulant was unclear. The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy of combined use of TXA and rivaroxaban on postoperative blood loss in primary minimally invasive TKA. METHODS: In a prospective, randomized, controlled trial, 198 patients were assigned to placebo (98 patients, normal saline injection) and study group (100 patients, 1g TXA intraoperative injection) during primary unilateral minimally invasive TKA...
August 27, 2016: Journal of Arthroplasty
Denisa Urban, Ruben Dehaeck, Diane Lorenzetti, Jonathan Guilfoyle, Man-Chiu Poon, MacGregor Steele, David Lardner, Irene Wai Yan Ma, Mary Elizabeth Brindle
INTRODUCTION: Trauma is the leading cause of death among children aged 1-18. Studies indicate that better control of bleeding could potentially prevent 10-20% of trauma-related deaths. The antifibrinolytic agent tranexamic acid (TxA) has shown promise in haemorrhage control in adult trauma patients. However, information on the potential benefits of TxA in children remains sparse. This review proposes to evaluate the current uses, benefits and adverse effects of TxA in the bleeding paediatric trauma population...
2016: BMJ Open
Xiaowu Wu, Michael A Dubick, Martin G Schwacha, Andrew P Cap, Daniel N Darlington
INTRODUCTION: Severe trauma, hemorrhage and resuscitation can lead to a trauma related acute lung injury that involves rapid infiltration of immune cells and platelets. This infiltration involves exymatic degradation of matrix proteins, including plasmin, and causes loss of barrier function. Since tranexamic acid (TXA) inhibits plasminogen/ plasmin binding to target substrates, it may attenuate loss of barrier function after severe trauma, hemorrhage and resuscitation. METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to polytrauma (laparotomy, and trauma to intestines, liver, right leg skeletal muscle and right femur fracture), then bled 40% of their blood volume...
September 19, 2016: Shock
M Maegele
Based upon the results of CRASH-2, early administration of antifibrinolytic tranexamic acid (TXA) is recommended in bleeding trauma patients or trauma patients presumed to bleed. Many trauma centers and emergency medical services have adopted this practice into their routine algorithms. The pitfalls of CRASH-2 have been discussed in the literature, but the positive effects could sometimes not be reproduced in follow-up studies. The mechanism of action of TXA in trauma is still not clear and major knowledge gaps with TXA in the context of trauma have been identified...
September 14, 2016: Der Unfallchirurg
Eun-Kyoo Song, Jong-Keun Seon, Jatin Prakash, Young-Jun Seol, Yong Jin Park, Cheng Jin
BACKGROUND: In this study, we tried to assess if combined method (intravenous [IV] and topical) of tranexamic acid (TXA) administration, which has been shown to be superior in conventional arthroplasty, has similar effect in navigational arthroplasty compared to administration of drug either individually. METHODS: In present randomized control trial, 200 patients were randomly divided in one of the 4 groups using computer-generated tables-control, IV, intraarticular, and combined...
July 6, 2016: Journal of Arthroplasty
Xuan Jiang, Xin-Long Ma, Jian-Xiong Ma
The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of i.v. tranexamic acid (TXA) in simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Potentially relevant published reports were identified from the following electronic databases: Medline, PubMed, Embase, ScienceDirect and Cochrane Library. RevMan v5.3was used to pool data. Two randomized controlled trials and four case-control studies met the inclusion criteria. The current meta-analysis identified significant differences between TXA group and control groups in terms of postoperative hemoglobin concentration (P < 0...
August 2016: Orthopaedic Surgery
Michael R Cohen, Judy L Smetzer
These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program...
November 2015: Hospital Pharmacy
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