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pelvic floor training

Steven J Weissbart, Alan J Wein, Ariana L Smith
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There are advantages and disadvantages of subspecialty certification for physicians, trainees, patients, and society at large. As female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery (FPMRS) became the second subspecialty of urology to offer subspecialty certification, understanding the effects of FPMRS subspecialty certification on the healthcare system is important. RECENT FINDINGS: While subspecialty certification may improve training, identify experts, and ultimately lead to improved patient outcomes, certification might also be unnecessary for some physicians, weaken residency training, and limit the number of physicians who are deemed qualified to offer certain treatments...
March 19, 2018: Current Urology Reports
Thais Regina de Mattos Lourenco, Priscila Katsumi Matsuoka, Edmund Chada Baracat, Jorge Milhem Haddad
INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: People are increasingly aware of healthy lifestyles. Extenuating practice can injure the pelvic floor. Urinary incontinence (UI) is a prevalent condition in women whether they exercise professionally or not. The most common symptom is stress UI. It is reported in a large variety of sports and may interfere with everyday life or training, leading athletes to change or compromise their performance or risk compromising it. We aimed to assess the prevalence of UI in female athletes and to determine whether the type of sport might also influence UI...
March 19, 2018: International Urogynecology Journal
Maria Lucia Campos Gonçalves, Samantha Fernandes, João Batista de Sousa
[Purpose] To assess the influence of moderate physical exercise on pelvic floor muscle electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback signal in female non-athletes. [Subjects and Methods] A prospective, non-randomized study of 90 adult females (age ≥18 years) divided into three groups: Intervention (I), which began physical exercise upon study enrollment; Moderate Exercise (ME), comprising those who already engaged in physical activity; and Sedentary (S), comprising those who had a sedentary lifestyle. All participants underwent EMG biofeedback of the pelvic floor muscles upon study enrollment (T1) and at the end of the third subsequent month (T2)...
February 2018: Journal of Physical Therapy Science
Aylin Aydın Sayılan, Ayfer Özbaş
The aim of the current study was to determine the effect of pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME/Kegel) training administered to patients scheduled for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy on postprocedural incontinence problems. This study was a randomized controlled trial. Pelvic floor muscle exercises were applied to the procedure group three times a day for 6 months. No exercises were applied to the control group. Incontinence and quality-of-life assessments of the 60 patients in the experimental and control groups were performed on months 0 (10 days after removal of the urinary catheter), 1, 3, and 6 through face-to-face and telephone interviews...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Men's Health
Ceren Orhan, Türkan Akbayrak, Serap Özgül, Emine Baran, Esra Üzelpasaci, Gülbala Nakip, Nejat Özgül, Mehmet Sinan Beksaç
INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: We evaluated whether vaginal tampon training (VTT) combined with pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) results in better outcomes than PFMT alone for treating stress urinary incontinence (SUI). METHODS: This was a randomized, controlled study. Patients were allocated to either the combined program, consisting of PFMT and VTT over 12 weeks [PFMT and VTT group (n = 24)] or to PFMT alone [PFMT group (n = 24)]. The primary outcome measure was self-reported improvement, while secondary outcome measures were severity of incontinence, quality of life (QoL), urinary parameters, and pelvic floor muscle strength (PFMS) and endurance (PFME)...
March 13, 2018: International Urogynecology Journal
Daniele Furtado-Albanezi, Soraia Pilon Jürgensen, Mariana Arias Avila, Grasiela Nascimento Correia, Patricia Driusso
INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The objective was to check the effects of two nonpharmacological treatments on the sleep quality of women with nocturia. METHODS: A randomized controlled clinical trial in which 40 women with nocturia were randomized into two groups; one was subjected to tibial nerve stimulation (GTNS) and the other received pelvic floor muscle training associated with behavioral therapy (GPFMT). Both groups were followed for 12 weeks, with one session/week; evaluated by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), King's Heath Questionnaire (KHQ), and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS)...
March 6, 2018: International Urogynecology Journal
Alex Mowat, Declan Maher, Kaven Baessler, Corina Christmann-Schmid, Nir Haya, Christopher Maher
BACKGROUND: Posterior vaginal wall prolapse (also known as 'posterior compartment prolapse') can cause a sensation of bulge in the vagina along with symptoms of obstructed defecation and sexual dysfunction. Interventions for prevention and conservative management include lifestyle measures, pelvic floor muscle training, and pessary use. We conducted this review to assess the surgical management of posterior vaginal wall prolapse. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of any surgical intervention compared with another surgical intervention for management of posterior vaginal wall prolapse...
March 5, 2018: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Ingunn Ludviksdottir, Hildur Hardardottir, Thorgerdur Sigurdardottir, Gudmundur F Ulfarsson
INTRODUCTION: Exercise can stress the pelvic floor muscles. Numerous women experience urinary incontinence while exercising or competing in sports. This study investigated pelvic floor muscle strength, urinary incontinence, and knowledge in contracting pelvic floor muscles among female athletes and untrained women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective case-control study measuring pelvic floor muscle strength using vaginal pressure meas-urement. Participants answered questions regarding general health, urinary incontinence, and knowledge on pelvic floor muscles...
2018: Læknablađiđ
Fátima Fitz, Marair Sartori, Manoel João Girão, Rodrigo Castro
INTRODUCTION: Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) involves the contraction of the puborectal, anal sphincter and external urethral muscles, inhibiting the detrusor contraction, what justify its use in the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms. OBJECTIVE: To verify the effects of isolated PFMT on the symptoms of OAB. METHOD: Prospective clinical trial with 27 women with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI), with predominance of OAB symptoms and loss ≥ 2 g in the pad test...
December 2017: Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira
You Maria Wu, Natalia McInnes, Yvonne Leong
OBJECTIVES: Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is often recommended to treat postpartum urinary incontinence (UI). However, the role of postpartum PFMT in pelvic organ prolapse (POP), sexual function, and anal incontinence (AI) remains unclear. We therefore aim to assess the efficacy of postpartum PFMT on these pelvic floor disorders. METHODS: This study is a meta-analysis consisting of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We searched databases including CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PEDro...
March 2018: Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery
Alexandre Fornari, Cristiane Carboni
INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Pelvic floor physiotherapy has been utilized extensively over the past decades for the treatment of pelvic floor dysfunctions. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize the most frequently cited articles on pelvic floor physiotherapy published in the last 30 years. METHODS: A PubMed search of all articles published between 1983 and 2013 was performed. Articles with more than 100 citations were identified as "classic," and were further analyzed based on author names, year of publication, journal of publication, subject, study design, country of research, and number of citations...
February 13, 2018: International Urogynecology Journal
Kaori Kinouchi, Kazutomo Ohashi
Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a smartphone-based reminder system in promoting pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) to help postpartum women manage urinary incontinence (UI). Methods: Forty-nine and 212 postpartum women in the intervention and control groups, respectively, received PFMT guidance using a leaflet and verbal instruction as the standard care at an obstetrics clinic in Japan. Women in the intervention group also received PFMT support using the smartphone-based reminder system between January and August 2014...
2018: PeerJ
Vahudin Zugor, Ilgar Akbarov, Leonidas Karapanos, Axel Heidenreich
Stress urinary incontinence in women is a common problem in Germany, with approx. 5 million women suffering from incontinence symptoms. These numbers are increasing, due to demographic changes; the suspected numbers are even higher. Prior to treatment, an extended diagnostic approach - including urodynamics and cystoscopy when necessary - is essential for optimal treatment selection.Primary treatment should be conservative, with pelvic floor training as an essential part of a multi-modal treatment concept. If conservative treatment fails, surgery is necessary and an increasing number of women are being treated with sub-urethral slings...
February 2018: Aktuelle Urologie
Alexandra Hill, Meryl Alappattu
Background: A non-invasive treatment for urinary incontinence (UI) is surface electromyography (sEMG) biofeedback with pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training. A lack of consensus and evidence exists on the Quality of Life (QoL) outcomes following sEMG biofeedback using surface electrodes at the perineum compared to the more invasive intravaginal probe. This case report examines QoL using sEMG biofeedback at the perineum with PFM training for UI. Study Design: Single subject case report...
May 2017: Journal of Women's Health Physical Therapy
Mehrnoosh Aref-Adib, Evangelia Vlachodimitropoulou, Rajvinder Khasriya, Benjamin W Lamb, Dan Selo-Ojeme
We assessed the attitudes of UK Obstetrics and Gynaecology (O&G) trainees towards a caesarean delivery for maternal request (CDMR); and identified differences in attitude towards patients requesting CDMR and preferences for their own mode of delivery. An internet survey was constructed with questions covering trainees' personal preferences towards and experience of CDMR; attitudes to CDMR; and how they might treat patients making this request. From 02/2013 to 06/2013, the survey was sent electronically via email to all UK Deaneries to be forwarded to O&G trainees...
January 27, 2018: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology: the Journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Vered Eisenberg, Rachel Kafri
Pelvic floor damage can occur during pregnancy, during childbirth or post-partum, and may be expressed by symptoms such as urinary incontinence, fecal and gas incontinence, sexual dysfunction, pelvic organ prolapse and chronic pelvic pain. Some of the symptoms, which manifest later in a woman's life, will go unrecognized in the immediate postpartum period. Most women do not mention their general health, unless specifically asked. Physiotherapists, who are adept with the anatomy of the musculoskeletal system and the ability to diagnose unique differences, can aid in the diagnosis and treatment of postpartum pelvic floor problems...
January 2018: Harefuah
Isabella Parente Ribeiro Frota, Adriana Bombonato Oliveira Rocha, José Ananias Vasconcelos Neto, Camila Teixeira Moreira Vasconcelos, Thais Fontes De Magalhaes, Sara Arcanjo Lino Karbage, Kathiane Lustosa Augusto, Simony Lira Do Nascimento, Jorge Millem Haddad, Leonardo Robson Pinheiro Sobreira Bezerra
INTRODUCTION: This study aims to compare pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function in postmenopausal women with and without pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) and the relationship between PFM function and quality of life. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A case-control study with 216 postmenopausal women with (n = 126) and without (n = 90) PFD. PFM function was assessed by digital vaginal palpation using the PERFECT scale. Specific quality of life was evaluated using the King's Health Questionnaire for women with urinary incontinence and the Prolapse Quality-of-Life Questionnaire for women with pelvic organ prolapse...
January 20, 2018: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
Sandra L Gluppe, Gunvor Hilde, Merete K Tennfjord, Marie E Engh, Kari Bø
Background: Diastasis recti abdominis affects a significant number of women during the prenatal and postnatal period. Objective: The objective was to evaluate the effect of a postpartum training program on prevalence of diastasis recti abdominis. Design: The design was a secondary analysis of an assessor-masked randomized controlled trial. Methods: One hundred and seventy-five primiparous women (mean age 29.8±4.1) were randomized to an exercise or control group...
January 17, 2018: Physical Therapy
Ester Bonmati, Yipeng Hu, Nikhil Sindhwani, Hans Peter Dietz, Jan D'hooge, Dean Barratt, Jan Deprest, Tom Vercauteren
Segmentation of the levator hiatus in ultrasound allows the extraction of biometrics, which are of importance for pelvic floor disorder assessment. We present a fully automatic method using a convolutional neural network (CNN) to outline the levator hiatus in a two-dimensional image extracted from a three-dimensional ultrasound volume. In particular, our method uses a recently developed scaled exponential linear unit (SELU) as a nonlinear self-normalizing activation function, which for the first time has been applied in medical imaging with CNN...
April 2018: Journal of Medical Imaging
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