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sleep and immunity

Susana Vacas, Vincent Degos, Mervyn Maze
BACKGROUND: Sleep is integral to biologic function, and sleep disruption can result in both physiological and psychologic dysfunction including cognitive decline. Surgery activates the innate immune system, inducing neuroinflammatory changes that interfere with cognition. Because surgical patients with sleep disorders have an increased likelihood of exhibiting postoperative delirium, an acute form of cognitive decline, we investigated the contribution of perioperative sleep fragmentation (SF) to the neuroinflammatory and cognitive responses of surgery...
October 11, 2016: Anesthesia and Analgesia
Mohan Raizada
Hypertension (HTN) is the most prevalent modifiable risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and disorders directly influencing CVD (i.e. obesity, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, obstructive sleep apnea, etc.). About one billion people worldwide have HTN, with American adults having 90% lifetime risk of developing HTN. Despite aggressive campaign for lifestyle changes and advances in drug therapy, HTN remains an immense health, emotional, and economic challenge. This is due, in part, to the fact that ∼50% of HTN patients' blood pressure remains uncontrolled and ∼20% of HTN patients are resistant to or require > antihypertensive drugs...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Brice Faraut, Thomas Andrillon, Marie-Françoise Vecchierini, Damien Leger
Sleep specialists have proposed measures to counteract the negative short- and long-term consequences of sleep debt, and some have suggested the nap as a potential and powerful "public health tool". Here, we address this countermeasure aspect of napping viewed as an action against sleep deprivation rather than an action associated with poor health. We review the physiological functions that have been associated positively with napping in both public health and clinical settings (sleep-related accidents, work and school, and cardiovascular risk) and in laboratory-based studies with potential public health issues (cognitive performance, stress, immune function and pain sensitivity)...
September 13, 2016: Sleep Medicine Reviews
Henrik Oster, Etienne Challet, Volker Ott, Emanuela Arvat, E Ronald de Kloet, Derk-Jan Dijk, Stafford Lightman, Alexandros Vgontzas, Eve Van Cauter
Adrenal glucocorticoids are major modulators of multiple functions, including energy metabolism, stress responses, immunity, and cognition. The endogenous secretion of glucocorticoids is normally characterized by a prominent and robust circadian (around 24 hours) oscillation, with a daily peak around the time of the habitual sleep-wake transition and minimal levels in the evening and early part of the night. It has been long recognized that this 24-h rhythm partly reflects the activity of a master circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus...
October 17, 2016: Endocrine Reviews
Mahzad Akbarpour, Abdelnaby Khalyfa, Zhuanghong Qiao, Alex Gileles-Hillel, Isaac Almendros, Ramon Farré, David Gozal
STUDY OBJECTIVE: The presence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with cancer appears to be accompanied by poorer outcomes. However, the mechanisms underlying such association are unknown. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), including CD8+ T cells, function as cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), and mount immune responses to cancer by the release of cytolytic enzymes, including granzyme B (GzmB), perforin (Prf) and cytokines such as interferon (IFN)-γ. METHODS: Using established in vivo mouse models, we investigated CD8+ T cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) in intermittent hypoxia (IH) and sleep fragmentation (SF) in the context of tumor environment...
October 10, 2016: Sleep
Nadia Gildeh, Panagis Drakatos, Sean Higgins, Ivana Rosenzweig, Brian D Kent
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) causes daytime fatigue and sleepiness, and has an established relationship with cardiovascular and metabolic disease. Recent years have seen the emergence of an evidence base linking OSA with an increased risk of degenerative neurological disease and associated cognitive impairment, an accelerated rate of decline in kidney function with an increased risk of clinically significant chronic kidney disease (CKD), and with a significantly higher rate of cancer incidence and death. This review evaluates the evidence base linking OSA with these seemingly unrelated co-morbidities, and explores potential mechanistic links underpinning their development in patients with OSA, including intermittent hypoxia (IH), sleep fragmentation, sympathetic excitation, and immune dysregulation...
September 2016: Journal of Thoracic Disease
Stefan Mogk, Christian M Boßelmann, Celestin N Mudogo, Jasmin Stein, Hartwig Wolburg, Michael Duszenko
African trypanosomes induce sleeping sickness. The parasites are transmitted during the blood meal of a tsetse fly and appear primarily in blood and lymph vessels, before they enter the central nervous system. During the latter stage, trypanosomes induce a deregulation of sleep-wake cycles and some additional neurological disorders. Historically, it was assumed that trypanosomes cross the blood-brain barrier and settle somewhere between the brain cells. The brain, however, is a strictly controlled and immune-privileged area that is completely surrounded by a dense barrier that covers the blood vessels: this is the blood-brain barrier...
October 14, 2016: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
Michael Bennardo, Faisal J Alibhai, Elena V Tsimakouridze, Nirmala Chinnappareddy, Peter Podobed, Cristine J Reitz, W Glen Pyle, Jeremy A Simpson, Tami A Martino
Diurnal or circadian rhythms are fundamentally important for healthy cardiovascular physiology, and play a role in timing of onset and tolerance to myocardial infarction (MI) in patients. Whether time of day of MI triggers different molecular and cellular responses that can influence myocardial remodelling is not known. This study was designed to test whether time of day of MI triggers different gene expression, humoral, and innate inflammatory responses that contribute to cardiac repair after MI. Mice were infarcted by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation (MI model) within a 2 hour time window either shortly after lights on or lights off, and the early remodelling responses at 8 hours post infarction were examined...
October 12, 2016: American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Andrew Keech, Ute Vollmer-Conna, Benjamin K Barry, Andrew R Lloyd
Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a debilitating disorder of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by fatigue, which is exacerbated after minimal exercise. We examined the effect of a single bout of aerobic exercise on leucocyte mRNA expression of genes putatively linked to exaggerated afferent signaling as an under-pinning of the fatigue state. A carefully-characterized sample of patients with CFS (N = 10) and healthy matched control participants (N = 12) were included. Participant ratings of fatigue and other symptoms, as well as blood samples, were obtained at baseline, and five other time-points up to 72 h after 25 min of moderate-intensity cycling exercise...
2016: Frontiers in Physiology
Judith E Carroll, Michael R Irwin, Morgan Levine, Teresa E Seeman, Devin Absher, Themistocles Assimes, Steve Horvath
BACKGROUND: Insomnia symptoms are associated with vulnerability to age-related morbidity and mortality. Cross-sectional data suggest that accelerated biological aging may be a mechanism through which sleep influences risk. A novel method for determining age acceleration using epigenetic methylation to DNA has demonstrated predictive utility as an epigenetic clock and prognostic of age-related morbidity and mortality. METHODS: We examined the association of epigenetic age and immune cell aging with sleep in the Women's Health Initiative study (N = 2078; mean 64...
July 26, 2016: Biological Psychiatry
Michael Joseph Lavery, Michael Owen Kinney, Hideki Mochizuki, John Craig, Gil Yosipovitch
Pruritus is a common complaint associated with many conditions. It negatively impacts sleep, quality of life, and mortality. Itch is transmitted along both histaminergic and non-histaminergic pathways with a complex interplay between keratinocytes, immune cells and cutaneous neurons. Individuals who present with pruritus should undergo a thorough assessment, especially those over 65 years old, to exclude underlying malignancy. Treatment no longer consists of antihistamines alone. Physicians now have an array of therapies in their armamentarium, to help alleviate this distressing symptom...
September 2016: Ulster Medical Journal
Lars Peter Holst Andersen
The hormone, melatonin is produced with circadian rhythm by the pineal gland in humans. The melatonin rhythm provides an endogenous synchronizer, modulating e.g. blood pressure, body temperature, cortisol rhythm, sleep-awake-cycle, immune function and anti-oxidative defence. Interestingly, a number of experimental animal studies demonstrate significant dose-dependent anti-nociceptive effects of exogenous melatonin. Similarly, recent experimental- and clinical studies in humans indicate significant analgesic effects...
October 2016: Danish Medical Journal
Aurora Van de Loo, Marlou Mackus, Gerdien Korte-Bouws, Karel Brookhuis, Johan Garssen, Joris Verster
BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between urine ethanol concentration and alcohol hangover severity. METHODS: N = 36 healthy social drinkers participated in a naturalistic study, comprising a hangover day and a control day. N = 18 of them have regular hangovers (the hangover group), while the other N = 18 claim to be hangover immune (hangover-immune group). On each test day at 9.30 am, urine samples were collected. Participants rated their overall hangover severity on a scale from 0 (absent) to 10 (extreme), as well as 18 individual hangover symptoms...
September 28, 2016: Psychopharmacology
Sonya VanPatten, Yousef Al-Abed
Acetylcholine, a major neurotransmitter of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, was discovered in the early 1900s. Over the years, researchers have revealed much about its regulation, properties of its receptors and features of the downstream signaling that influence its terminal effects. The acetylcholine system, traditionally associated with neuromuscular communication, is now known to play a crucial part in modulation of the immune system and other 'rest and digest' effects. Recent research seeks to elucidate the system's role in brain functions including cognition, sleep, arousal, motivation, reward and pain...
September 22, 2016: Drug Discovery Today
Christian Brix Folsted Andersen, Kristian Stødkilde, Kirstine Lindhart Sæderup, Anne Kuhlee, Stefan Raunser, Jonas Heilskov Graversen, Søren Kragh Moestrup
SIGNIFICANCE: Haptoglobin (Hp) is an abundant human plasma protein that tightly captures hemoglobin (Hb) during hemolysis. The Hb-Hp complex formation reduces the oxidative properties of heme/Hb and promotes recognition by the macrophage receptor CD163. This leads to Hb-Hp breakdown and heme catabolism by heme oxygenase. Gene duplications of a part of or the entire Hp gene in the primate evolution has led to variant Hp gene products that collectively may be designated 'the haptoglobins' as they all bind Hb...
September 21, 2016: Antioxidants & Redox Signaling
Ryan P Vetreno, Yesha Patel, Urvi Patel, T Jordan Walter, Fulton T Crews
Serotonergic neurons of the raphe nucleus regulate sleep, mood, endocrine function, and other processes that mature during adolescence. Alcohol abuse and binge drinking are common during human adolescence. We tested the novel hypothesis that adolescent intermittent ethanol exposure would alter the serotonergic system that would persist into adulthood. Using a Wistar rat model of adolescent intermittent ethanol (AIE; 5.0 g/kg, i.g., 2-day on/2-day off from postnatal day [P]25 to P55), we found a loss of dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) serotonin (5-HT)-immunoreactive (+IR) neurons that persisted from late adolescence (P56) into adulthood (P220)...
September 16, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Mohan Raizada
Hypertension (HTN) is the most prevalent modifiable risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and disorders directly influencing CVD (i.e. obesity, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, obstructive sleep apnea, etc.). About one billion people worldwide have HTN, with American adults having 90% lifetime risk of developing HTN. Despite aggressive campaign for lifestyle changes and advances in drug therapy, HTN remains an immense health, emotional, and economic challenge. This is due, in part, to the fact that ∼50% of HTN patients' blood pressure remains uncontrolled and ∼20% of HTN patients are resistant to or require > antihypertensive drugs...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Nathaniel F Watson, Dedra Buchwald, Jeff J Delrow, Willian A Altemeier, Michael V Vitiello, Allan I Pack, Mike Bamshad, Carolyn Noonan, Sina Gharib
INTRODUCTION: Habitual short sleep duration is associated with adverse metabolic, cardiovascular, and inflammatory effects. Co-twin study methodologies account for familial (e.g., genetics and shared environmental) confounding, allowing assessment of subtle environmental effects, such as the effect of habitual short sleep duration on gene expression. Therefore, we investigated gene expression in monozygotic twins discordant for actigraphically phenotyped habitual sleep duration. METHODS: Eleven healthy monozygotic twin pairs (82% female; mean age 42...
September 9, 2016: Sleep
Christian Otte, Stefan M Gold, Brenda W Penninx, Carmine M Pariante, Amit Etkin, Maurizio Fava, David C Mohr, Alan F Schatzberg
Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a debilitating disease that is characterized by depressed mood, diminished interests, impaired cognitive function and vegetative symptoms, such as disturbed sleep or appetite. MDD occurs about twice as often in women than it does in men and affects one in six adults in their lifetime. The aetiology of MDD is multifactorial and its heritability is estimated to be approximately 35%. In addition, environmental factors, such as sexual, physical or emotional abuse during childhood, are strongly associated with the risk of developing MDD...
2016: Nature Reviews. Disease Primers
Raphaël Bernard-Valnet, Lidia Yshii, Clémence Quériault, Xuan-Hung Nguyen, Sébastien Arthaud, Magda Rodrigues, Astrid Canivet, Anne-Laure Morel, Arthur Matthys, Jan Bauer, Béatrice Pignolet, Yves Dauvilliers, Christelle Peyron, Roland S Liblau
Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a rare and severe sleep disorder caused by the destruction of orexinergic neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. The genetic and environmental factors associated with narcolepsy, together with serologic data, collectively point to an autoimmune origin. The current animal models of narcolepsy, based on either disruption of the orexinergic neurotransmission or neurons, do not allow study of the potential autoimmune etiology. Here, we sought to generate a mouse model that allows deciphering of the immune mechanisms leading to orexin(+) neuron loss and narcolepsy development...
September 27, 2016: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
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