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Anneke Kroes, Colette Broekgaarden, Marcos Castellanos Uribe, Sean May, Joop J A van Loon, Marcel Dicke
Plants are commonly attacked by multiple herbivorous species. Yet, little is known about transcriptional patterns underlying plant responses to multiple insect attackers feeding simultaneously. Here, we assessed transcriptomic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to simultaneous feeding by Plutella xylostella caterpillars and Brevicoryne brassicae aphids in comparison to plants infested by P. xylostella caterpillars alone, using microarray analysis. We particularly investigated how aphid feeding interferes with the transcriptomic response to P...
October 22, 2016: Oecologia
Andrew N Gherlenda, Ben D Moore, Anthony M Haigh, Scott N Johnson, Markus Riegler
BACKGROUND: Climate change factors such as elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations (e[CO2]) and altered rainfall patterns can alter leaf composition and phenology. This may subsequently impact insect herbivory. In sclerophyllous forests insects have developed strategies, such as preferentially feeding on new leaf growth, to overcome physical or foliar nitrogen constraints, and this may shift under climate change. Few studies of insect herbivory at elevated [CO2] have occurred under field conditions and none on mature evergreen trees in a naturally established forest, yet estimates for leaf area loss due to herbivory are required in order to allow accurate predictions of plant productivity in future climates...
October 19, 2016: BMC Ecology
Stefano Papazian, Eliezer Khaling, Christelle Bonnet, Steve Lassueur, Philippe Reymond, Thomas Moritz, James Blande, Benedicte Riber Albrectsen
Plants have evolved adaptive mechanisms that allow them to tolerate a continuous range of abiotic and biotic stressors. Tropospheric ozone (O3), a global anthropogenic pollutant, directly affects living organisms and ecosystems, including plant-herbivore interactions. In this study, we investigate the stress responses of wild black mustard (Brassica nigra) exposed consecutively to O3 and the specialist herbivore Pieris brassicae. Transcriptomics and metabolomics data were evaluated using multivariate, correlation, and network analyses for the O3 and herbivory responses...
October 6, 2016: Plant Physiology
Luis Abdala-Roberts, Johnattan Hernández-Cumplido, Luis Chel-Guerrero, David Betancur-Ancona, Betty Benrey, Xoaquín Moreira
PREMISE OF STUDY: Although there is increasing recognition of the effects of plant intraspecific diversity on consumers, the mechanisms by which such effects cascade-up to higher trophic levels remain elusive. METHODS: We evaluated the effects of plant (lima bean, Phaseolus lunatus) intraspecific diversity on a suite of insect herbivores (leaf-chewers, aphids, and seed-eating beetles) and their third trophic-level associates (parasitoids and aphid-tending ants)...
October 18, 2016: American Journal of Botany
Juli Carrillo, Evan Siemann
Plant competition may mediate the impacts of herbivory on invasive plant species through effects on plant growth and defense. This may predictably depend on whether herbivory occurs above or below ground and on relative plant competitive ability. We simulated the potential impact of above- or belowground damage by biocontrol agents on the growth of a woody invader (Chinese tallow tree, Triadica sebifera) through artificial herbivory, with or without competition with a native grass, little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium)...
October 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Kari E Veblen, Lauren M Porensky, Corinna Riginos, Truman P Young
The widespread replacement of wild ungulate herbivores by domestic livestock in African savannas is composed of two interrelated phenomena: (1) loss or reduction in numbers of individual wildlife species or guilds and (2) addition of livestock to the system. Each can have important implications for plant community dynamics. Yet very few studies have experimentally addressed the individual, combined, and potentially interactive effects of wild vs. domestic herbivore species on herbaceous plant communities within a single system...
September 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Julia Bally, Glen J McIntyre, Rachel L Doran, Karen Lee, Alicia Perez, Hyungtaek Jung, Fatima Naim, Ignacio M Larrinua, Kenneth E Narva, Peter M Waterhouse
Expressing double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in transgenic plants to silence essential genes within herbivorous pests is referred to as trans-kingdom RNA interference (TK-RNAi) and has emerged as a promising strategy for crop protection. However, the dicing of dsRNA into siRNAs by the plant's intrinsic RNAi machinery may reduce this pesticidal activity. Therefore, genetic constructs, encoding ∼200 nt duplex-stemmed-hairpin (hp) RNAs, targeting the acetylcholinesterase gene of the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, were integrated into either the nuclear or the chloroplast genome of Nicotiana benthamiana...
2016: Frontiers in Plant Science
L C Emebiri, M-K Tan, M El-Bouhssini, O Wildman, A Jighly, W Tadesse, F C Ogbonnaya
This research provides the first report of a major locus controlling wheat resistance to Sunn pest. It developed and validated SNP markers that will be useful for marker-assisted selection. Sunn pest (Eurygaster integriceps Puton) is the most destructive insect pest of bread wheat and durum wheat in West and Central Asia and East Europe. Breeding for resistance at the vegetative stage of growth is vital in reducing the damage caused by overwintered adult populations that feed on shoot and leaves of seedlings, and in reducing the next generation of pest populations (nymphs and adults), which can cause damage to grain quality by feeding on spikes...
October 15, 2016: TAG. Theoretical and Applied Genetics. Theoretische und Angewandte Genetik
Frederike Ricarda Boehm, Leonardo Sandrini-Neto, Tom Moens, Paulo da Cunha Lana
Mangrove forests are highly productive and play a major role in global carbon cycling. Their carbon accumulation can be influenced through the consumption of nutrient-poor leaves and propagules by herbivore crabs. Anthropogenic nutrient input from sewage contamination is widespread in these often naturally nutrient-limited ecosystems. We hypothesised that sewage-mediated nutrient input to mangrove stands of Paranaguá Bay (southern Brazil), would alter the nutrient sources available for crabs, e.g. through microphytobenthos increase, and that this would reflect in their feeding behaviour...
September 19, 2016: Marine Environmental Research
Jan Šklíba, Tereza Vlasatá, Matěj Lövy, Ema Hrouzková, Yonas Meheretu, Claudio Sillero-Zubiri, Radim Šumbera
Rodents with prevailing subterranean activity usually play an important role in the ecosystems of which they are a part due to the combined effect of herbivory and soil perturbation. This is also the case of the giant root-rat Tachyoryctes macrocephalus, Rüppell 1842, endemic to the Afroalpine ecosystem of the Bale Mountains, Ethiopia. We studied the impact of root-rats on various ecosystem features within a 3.5ha study locality dominated by Alchemilla pasture, which represents an optimal habitat for this species, in two periods of a year...
October 13, 2016: Integrative Zoology
Mauro Commisso, Ketti Toffali, Pamela Strazzer, Matteo Stocchero, Stefania Ceoldo, Barbara Baldan, Marisa Levi, Flavia Guzzo
The phenylpropanoid and flavonoid families include thousands of specialized metabolites that influence a wide range of processes in plants, including seed dispersal, auxin transport, photoprotection, mechanical support and protection against insect herbivory. Such metabolites play a key role in the protection of plants against abiotic stress, in many cases through their well-known ability to inhibit the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the precise role of specific phenylpropanoid and flavonoid molecules is unclear...
2016: Frontiers in Plant Science
Stefanie Raddatz, Tamar Guy-Haim, Gil Rilov, Martin Wahl
Human induced ocean warming and acidification have received increasing attention over the past decade and are considered to have substantial consequences for a broad range of marine species and their interactions. Understanding how these interactions shift in response to climate change is particularly important with regard to foundation species, such as the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus. This macroalga represents the dominant habitat former on coastal rocky substrata of the Baltic Sea, fulfilling functions essential for the entire benthic community...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Phycology
Emily Meineke, Elsa Youngsteadt, Robert R Dunn, Steven D Frank
A substantial amount of global carbon is stored in mature trees. However, no experiments to date test how warming affects mature tree carbon storage. Using a unique, citywide, factorial experiment, we investigated how warming and insect herbivory affected physiological function and carbon sequestration (carbon stored per year) of mature trees. Urban warming increased herbivorous arthropod abundance on trees, but these herbivores had negligible effects on tree carbon sequestration. Instead, urban warming was associated with an estimated 12% loss of carbon sequestration, in part because photosynthesis was reduced at hotter sites...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Pasi Yli-Pirilä, Lucian Copolovici, Astrid Kannaste, Steffen Noe, James D Blande, Santtu Mikkonen, Tero Klemola, Juha Tapio Pulkkinen, Annele Virtanen, Ari Laaksonen, Jorma Joutsensaari, Ülo Niinemets, Jarmo Kalevi Holopainen
In addition to climate warming, greater herbivore pressure is anticipated to enhance the emissions of climate-relevant biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from boreal and subarctic forests and promote the formation of secondary aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere. We evaluated the effects of Epirrita autumnata, an outbreaking geometrid moth, feeding and larval density on herbivore-induced VOC emissions from mountain birch in laboratory experiments, and assessed the impact of these emissions on SOA formation via ozonolysis in chamber experiments...
October 5, 2016: Environmental Science & Technology
Atsuko Tanaka, Yoichiro Hoshino, Chikako Nagasato, Taizo Motomura
Tissue wounds are mainly caused by herbivory, which is a serious threat for macro-algae, and brown algae are known to regenerate branches or buds in response to wounding. In the present paper, we describe a branch regeneration system, induced by sever damage, in the brown alga Dictyota dichotoma. Segmentations of juvenile thalli induced branch regenerations unless explants possessed apical cells. Apical excisions in distinct positions elucidated that disruption of an apical cell or disconnection of tissue with an apical cell triggered the branch regeneration...
October 4, 2016: Protoplasma
Elizabeth J Roberson, Michael J Chips, Walter P Carson, Thomas P Rooney
Indirect ecological effects are a common feature of ecological systems, arising when one species affects interactions among two or more other species. We examined how browsing by white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) indirectly affected the abundance and composition of a web-building spider guild through their effects on the structure of the ground and shrub layers of northern hardwood forests. We examined paired plots consisting of deer-free and control plots in the Allegheny Plateau region Pennsylvania and Northern Highlands region of Wisconsin...
2016: PeerJ
Sally A Power, Kirk L Barnett, Raul Ochoa-Hueso, Sarah L Facey, Eleanor V J Gibson-Forty, Susan E Hartley, Uffe N Nielsen, David T Tissue, Scott N Johnson
Climate models predict shifts in the amount, frequency and seasonality of rainfall. Given close links between grassland productivity and rainfall, such changes are likely to have profound effects on the functioning of grassland ecosystems and modify species interactions. Here, we introduce a unique, new experimental platform - DRI-Grass (Drought and Root Herbivore Interactions in a Grassland) - that exposes a south-eastern Australian grassland to five rainfall regimes [Ambient (AMB), increased amount (IA, +50%), reduced amount (RA, -50%), reduced frequency (RF, single rainfall event every 21 days, with total amount unchanged) and summer drought (SD, 12-14 weeks without water, December-March)], and contrasting levels of root herbivory...
2016: Frontiers in Plant Science
Lisa Noelle Cooper, Mark T Clementz, Sharon Usip, Sunil Bajpai, S Taseer Hussain, Tobin L Hieronymus
The earliest cetaceans were interpreted as semi-aquatic based on the presence of thickened bones and stable oxygen isotopes in tooth enamel. However, the origin of aquatic behaviors in cetacean relatives (e.g., raoellids, anthracotheres) remains unclear. This study reconstructs the origins of aquatic behaviors based on long bone microanatomy and stable oxygen isotopes of tooth enamel in modern and extinct cetartiodactylans. Our findings are congruent with published accounts that microanatomy can be a reliable indicator of aquatic behaviors in taxa that are obligatorily aquatic, and also highlight that some "semi-aquatic" behaviors (fleeing into the water to escape predation) may have a stronger relationship to bone microanatomy than others (herbivory in near-shore aquatic settings)...
October 3, 2016: Integrative and Comparative Biology
Alison J Popay, Neil R Cox
Aploneura lentisci Pass. is endemic to the Mediterranean region where it is holocyclic, forming galls on its primary host, Pistacia lentiscus and alternating over a 2-year period between Pistacia and secondary hosts, principally species of Gramineae. This aphid is widely distributed in Australia and New Zealand on the roots of the common forage grasses, ryegrass (Lolium spp.) and tall fescue (Schedonorus phoenix) where it exists as permanent, anholocyclic, parthenogenetic populations. Previous studies have indicated that infestations of A...
2016: Frontiers in Plant Science
William Deasy, Tom Shepherd, Colin J Alexander, A Nicholas E Birch, K Andrew Evans
INTRODUCTION: Research on plant root chemical ecology has benefited greatly from recent developments in analytical chemistry. Numerous reports document techniques for sampling root volatiles, although only a limited number describe in situ collection. OBJECTIVES: To demonstrate a new method for non-invasive in situ passive sampling using solid phase micro extraction (SPME), from the immediate vicinity of growing roots. METHODS: SPME fibres inserted into polyfluorotetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) sampling tubes located in situ which were either perforated, covered with stainless steel mesh or with microporous PTFE tubing, were used for non-invasive sub-surface sampling of root volatiles from glasshouse-grown broccoli...
November 2016: Phytochemical Analysis: PCA
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