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Zygmunt Zdrojewicz, Bartłomiej Kuszczak, Natalia Olszak
Ibogaine is a natural chemical compound, which belongs to the indole alkaloid family. It can be naturally found within the root bark of african plant Tabernanthe iboga. Ibogaine plays a significant role among tribal cultures. Ibogaine, in small amount, causes reduction of hunger, thirst and exhaustion. In bigger amount, however, it can cause intensive visions. Other effects include reduction or complete disappearance of absitnence symptoms visible in people addicted to the nicotine, alcohol, methamphetamine, cocaine or opioids, what has been scientifically proven after the tests on animals and small groups of people...
July 29, 2016: Polski Merkuriusz Lekarski: Organ Polskiego Towarzystwa Lekarskiego
Pieter Beerepoot, Vincent M Lam, Ali Salahpour
A number of pathological conditions have been linked to mutations in the dopamine transporter gene, including hereditary dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome (DTDS). DTDS is a rare condition that is caused by autosomal recessive loss-of-function mutations in the dopamine transporter (DAT), which often affects transporter trafficking and folding. We examined the possibility of using pharmacological chaperones of DAT to rescue DTDS mutations. After screening a set of known DAT ligands for their ability to increase DAT surface expression, we found that bupropion and ibogaine increased DAT surface expression, whereas others, including cocaine and methylphenidate, had no effect...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Biological Chemistry
Felix Krengel, Josefina Herrera Santoyo, Teresa de Jesús Olivera Flores, Víctor Manuel Chávez Ávila, Francisco Javier Pérez Flores, Ricardo Reyes Chilpa
Tabernaemontana alba and T. arborea are Apocynaceae species used in Mexican traditional medicine for which little phytochemical information exists. In this study, preliminary GC-MS analyses of different organs obtained from wild plants of both species identified a total of 10 monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs) and one simple indole alkaloid, nine of which were reported for the first time in these species. Furthermore, callus cultures were established from T. alba leaf explants and regeneration of whole plants was accomplished via somatic embryogenesis...
July 23, 2016: Chemistry & Biodiversity
L J Schep, R J Slaughter, S Galea, D Newcombe
The indole alkaloid ibogaine, present in the root bark of the West African rain forest shrub Tabernanthe iboga, has been adopted in the West as a treatment for drug dependence. Treatment of patients requires large doses of the alkaloid to cause hallucinations, an alleged integral part of the patient's treatment regime. However, case reports and case series continue to describe evidences of ataxia, gastrointestinal distress, ventricular arrhythmias and sudden and unexplained deaths of patients undergoing treatment for drug dependence...
September 1, 2016: Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Thomas Gicquel, Chloé Hugbart, Françoise Le Devehat, Sylvie Lepage, Alain Baert, Renaud Bouvet, Isabelle Morel
Powdered roots of iboga (Tabernanthe iboga) contain ibogaine, an alkaloid that has been used to treat addictions. We report the case of a 30-year-old woman who died after ingesting a powder labeled as Tabernanthe iboga she had bought online. Analysis of the powder revealed the absence of ibogaine but the presence of toxic alkaloids (ajmaline, yohimbine and reserpine) found in Rauvolfia sp. plant species. An original and specific LC-MS/MS method developed to quantify ajmaline, yohimbine and reserpine showed respective concentrations of 109...
September 2016: Forensic Science International
M Belgers, M Leenaars, J R Homberg, M Ritskes-Hoitinga, A F A Schellekens, C R Hooijmans
Ibogaine is a naturally occurring substance which has been increasingly used in the lay-scene to reduce craving and relapse in patients with substance use disorders (SUDs). Although human clinical trials on the safety and efficacy of ibogaine are lacking, animal studies do support the efficacy of ibogaine. In this systematic review and meta-analysis (MA), we summarise these animal findings, addressing three questions: (1) does ibogaine reduce addictive behaviour in animal models of SUDs?; (2) what are the toxic effects of ibogaine on motor functioning, cerebellum and heart rhythm?; (3) what are neuropharmacological working mechanisms of ibogaine treatment in animal models of SUDs? MA of 27 studies showed that ibogaine reduced drug self-administration, particularly during the first 24 h after administration...
2016: Translational Psychiatry
Luke Yip, Jou-Fang Deng
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2016: Clinical Toxicology
Tibor M Brunt, Ruud P W Litjens
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2016: Clinical Toxicology
Laurie Cloutier-Gill, Evan Wood, Trevor Millar, Caroline Ferris, M Eugenia Socias
BACKGROUND: Opioid use disorders (OUD) translate into major health, social, and economic consequences. Opioid agonist medications, which generally require long-term administration, are the mainstay pharmacological treatment of OUD. However, a large proportion of individuals with OUD either refuse or fail to respond to these therapies. Ibogaine, a naturally occurring substance found in the Tabernanthe iboga plant, has shown potential to bring about transformative or spiritual experiences that have reportedly been associated with long-term abstinece...
July 2016: Journal of Psychoactive Drugs
Bridget Forsyth, Liana Machado, Tim Jowett, Hannah Jakobi, Kira Garbe, Helen Winter, Paul Glue
ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Root bark from Tabernanthe iboga has been used traditionally in West Africa as a psychoactive substance in religious rituals. In smaller doses it is reported anecdotally to have stimulant properties. AIM OF THE STUDY: To evaluate the influence of a single 20mg ibogaine dose on psychological variables reflecting subjective mood state and a range of cognitive functions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 21 healthy male volunteers received single 20mg doses of ibogaine after 6 days pretreatment with double-blind paroxetine or placebo...
August 2, 2016: Journal of Ethnopharmacology
Gaoyuan Zhao, Xingang Xie, Haiyu Sun, Ziyun Yuan, Zhuliang Zhong, Shouchu Tang, Xuegong She
We present the application of a bioinspired collective synthesis strategy in the total syntheses of seven iboga-type indole alkaloids: (±)-tabertinggine, (±)-ibogamine, (±)-ibogaine, (±)-ibogaine hydroxyindolenine, (±)-3-oxoibogaine hydroxyindolenine, (±)-iboluteine, and (±)-ervaoffines D. In particular, tabertinggine and its congeners serve as iboga precursors for the subsequent biomimetic transformations into other iboga-type alkaloids.
May 20, 2016: Organic Letters
Jessica A Meisner, Susan R Wilcox, Jeremy B Richards
A naturally occurring hallucinogenic plant alkaloid, ibogaine has been used as an adjuvant for opiate withdrawal for the past 50 years. In the setting of an escalating nationwide opiate epidemic, use of substances such as ibogaine may also increase. Therefore, familiarity with the mechanisms and potential adverse effects of ibogaine is important for clinicians. We present the case report of a man whose use of ibogaine resulted in cardiac arrest and death, complemented by a review of the literature regarding ibogaine's clinical effects...
April 2016: Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology
Yuan-Wei Zhang, Benjamin E Turk, Gary Rudnick
Serotonin transporter (SERT) is responsible for reuptake and recycling of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) after its exocytotic release during neurotransmission. Mutations in human SERT are associated with psychiatric disorders and autism. Some of these mutations affect the regulation of SERT activity by cGMP-dependent phosphorylation. Here we provide direct evidence that this phosphorylation occurs at Thr276, predicted to lie near the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane helix 5 (TM5). Using membranes from HeLa cells expressing SERT and intact rat basophilic leukemia cells, we show that agents such as Na(+) and cocaine that stabilize outward-open conformations of SERT decreased phosphorylation and agents that stabilize inward-open conformations (e...
May 17, 2016: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Branden L Eggan, Sarah E McCallum
Systemic 18-methoxycoronaridine, an alpha3beta4 nicotinic antagonist, slows the rate of induction of behavioral sensitization to nicotine (Glick et al., 1996; 2011). The primary mechanism of action of 18-MC is believed to be the inhibition of α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors which are densely expressed in the medial habenula and interpeduncular nucleus (Pace et al., 2004; Glick et al., 2012). Recently, these habenular nicotinic receptors and their multiple roles in nicotine aversion and withdrawal have been increasingly emphasized (Antolin-Fontes et al...
July 1, 2016: Behavioural Brain Research
Deborah C Mash, Barbara Ameer, Delphine Prou, John F Howes, Emeline L Maillet
This study investigated the effects of noribogaine, the principal metabolite of the drug ibogaine, on substance-related disorders. In the first experiment, mice chronically treated with morphine were subjected to naloxone-precipitated withdrawal two hours after oral administration of noribogaine. Oral noribogaine dose dependently decreased the global opiate withdrawal score by up to 88% of vehicle control with an ED50 of 13 mg/kg. In the second experiment, blood and brain levels of noribogaine showed a high brain penetration and a brain/blood ratio of 7±1 across all doses tested...
July 2016: Journal of Psychopharmacology
Lena Rubi, Daniel Eckert, Stefan Boehm, Karlheinz Hilber, Xaver Koenig
Ibogaine is a plant alkaloid used as anti-addiction drug in dozens of alternative medicine clinics worldwide. Recently, alarming reports of life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias and cases of sudden death associated with the ingestion of ibogaine have accumulated. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings, we assessed the effects of ibogaine and its main metabolite noribogaine on action potentials in human ventricular-like cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. Therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine and its long-lived active metabolite noribogaine significantly retarded action potential repolarization in human cardiomyocytes...
March 28, 2016: Cardiovascular Toxicology
Ruud P W Litjens, Tibor M Brunt
CONTEXT: Ibogaine is a psychoactive indole alkaloid found in the African rainforest shrub Tabernanthe Iboga. It is unlicensed but used in the treatment of drug and alcohol addiction. However, reports of ibogaine's toxicity are cause for concern. OBJECTIVES: To review ibogaine's pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, mechanisms of action and reported toxicity. METHODS: A search of the literature available on PubMed was done, using the keywords "ibogaine" and "noribogaine"...
2016: Clinical Toxicology
Catherine Hildyard, Philip Macklin, Bernard Prendergast, Yaver Bashir
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Emeline L Maillet, Nicolas Milon, Mari D Heghinian, James Fishback, Stephan C Schürer, Nandor Garamszegi, Deborah C Mash
Noribogaine is the long-lived human metabolite of the anti-addictive substance ibogaine. Noribogaine efficaciously reaches the brain with concentrations up to 20 μM after acute therapeutic dose of 40 mg/kg ibogaine in animals. Noribogaine displays atypical opioid-like components in vivo, anti-addictive effects and potent modulatory properties of the tolerance to opiates for which the mode of action remained uncharacterized thus far. Our binding experiments and computational simulations indicate that noribogaine may bind to the orthosteric morphinan binding site of the opioid receptors...
December 2015: Neuropharmacology
Cassandra Willyard
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 25, 2015: Nature
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