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non traumatic brain injury

Cameron A Elliott, Vijay Ramaswamy, Francois D Jacob, Tejas Sankar, Vivek Mehta
BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of infant morbidity and mortality. In these patients, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is the test of choice to describe the extent of microstructural injury. CASE PRESENTATION AND DISCUSSION: In this case series, we describe novel acute and chronic MRI findings in four infants (6-19 months) with small, unilateral subdural hematomas in whom the etiology of head injury was suspicious for non-accidental trauma (NAT)...
October 20, 2016: Child's Nervous System: ChNS: Official Journal of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery
Ariel Haimovici, Pablo Balenzuela, Enzo Tagliazucchi
Synchronization of brain activity fluctuations is believed to represent communication between spatially distant neural processes. These inter-areal functional interactions develop in the background of a complex network of axonal connections linking cortical and sub-cortical neurons, termed the human "structural connectome". Theoretical considerations and experimental evidence support the view that the human brain can be modeled as a system operating at a critical point between ordered (sub-critical) and disordered (super-critical) phases...
October 19, 2016: Brain Connectivity
Abigail Livny, Anat Biegon, Tammar Kushnir, Sagi Harnof, Chen Hoffmann, Eyal Fruchter, Mark Weiser
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is known to have a substantial, though highly variable, impact on cognitive abilities. Due to the wide range of cognitive abilities among healthy individuals, an objective assessment of TBI-related cognitive loss requires an accurate measurement of premorbid cognitive performance. To address this problem, we recruited 50 adults who sustained a TBI and had performed a cognitive baseline assessment in adolescence as part of the aptitude tests mandated by the Israeli Defense Forces...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
John E Cebak, Indrapal N Singh, Rachel L Hill, Juan Wang, Edward D Hall
Lipid peroxidation is a key contributor to the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Traditional antioxidant therapies are intended to scavenge the free radicals responsible for either the initiation or the propagation of lipid peroxidation (LP). A more recently explored approach involves scavenging the terminal LP breakdown products that are highly reactive and neurotoxic carbonyl compounds 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and acrolein to prevent their covalent modification and rendering of cellular proteins non-functional leading to loss of ionic homeostasis, mitochondrial failure, and subsequent neuronal death...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Dana Wong, Kelly Sinclair, Elizabeth Seabrook, Adam McKay, Jennie Ponsford
PURPOSE: Smartphones have great potential as a convenient, multifunction tool to support cognition and independence following traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, there has been limited investigation of their helpful and less helpful aspects for people with TBI. We aimed to investigate patterns of smartphone use amongst individuals with TBI, identify potential barriers to use, and examine the relationships between smartphone use and daily functioning. METHOD: Twenty-nine participants with TBI and 33 non-injured participants completed the Smartphone Survey, and measures of subjective and objective cognitive functioning, mood, and community integration...
October 17, 2016: Disability and Rehabilitation
Megan J Leonhard, Dagan A Wright, Rongwei Fu, David P Lehrfeld, Kathleen F Carlson
BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) greatly contributes to morbidity and mortality in the pediatric population. We examined potential urban/rural disparities in mortality amongst Oregon pediatric patients with TBI treated in trauma hospitals. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of children ages 0-19 using the Oregon Trauma Registry for years 2009-2012. Geographic location of injury was classified using the National Center for Health Statistics Urban/Rural Classification Scheme...
December 2015: Injury Epidemiology
Koon-Pong Wong, Marvin Bergsneider, Thomas C Glenn, Vladimir Kepe, Jorge R Barrio, David A Hovda, Paul M Vespa, Sung-Cheng Huang
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity, placing a significant financial burden on the healthcare system worldwide. Non-invasive neuroimaging technologies have been playing a pivotal role in the study of TBI, providing important information for surgical planning and patient management. Advances in understanding the basic mechanisms and pathophysiology of the brain following TBI are hindered by a lack of reliable image analysis methods for accurate quantitative assessment of TBI-induced structural and pathophysiological changes seen on anatomical and functional images obtained from multiple imaging modalities...
March 2016: Brain Informatics
Kathleen Brewer-Smyth, Monica Cornelius, Ryan T Pohlig
The staggering prevalence of obesity and obesity-related health conditions takes exorbitant tolls on health care resources. This cross-sectional study with private evaluations of 636 adult inmates in a southern state prison was conducted with regressions comparing obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 30) to nonobese individuals to define obesity risk factors. Obese individuals more likely were female, were victims of childhood sexual abuse, suffered greater severity of childhood sexual abuse, attempted suicide, reported drug dependency, were non-Caucasian, and were older than nonobese...
October 2016: Journal of Correctional Health Care
Ashley Blanchard, Keven I Cabrera, Nathan Kuppermann, Peter S Dayan
OBJECTIVES: We aimed to determine the prevalence of and adverse outcomes caused by pneumocephali in children with minor blunt head trauma who had no other intracranial injuries (ie, isolated pneumocephali). METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis of a public use dataset from a multicenter prospective study of pediatric minor head trauma. We included children younger than 18 years with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 14 or 15 and non-trivial mechanisms of injury who had cranial computed tomographies obtained...
October 6, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Stephen S Humble, Laura D Wilson, John W McKenna, Taylor C Leath, Yanna Song, Mario A Davidson, Jesse M Ehrenfeld, Oscar D Guillamondegui, Pratik P Pandharipande, Mayur B Patel
OBJECTIVE: To determine risk factors associated with tracheostomy placement after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and subsequent outcomes among those who did and did not receive a tracheostomy. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study compared adult trauma patients with severe TBI (n = 583) who did and did not receive tracheostomy. A multivariable logistic regression model assessed the associations between age, sex, race, insurance status, admission GCS, AIS (Head, Face, Chest) and tracheostomy placement...
October 14, 2016: Brain Injury: [BI]
Volker Ressel, Ruth O'Gorman Tuura, Ianina Scheer, Hubertus J A van Hedel
BACKGROUND: Rehabilitation in children with acquired brain injury is a challenging endeavour. There is a large variability in motor recovery between patients, and a need to optimize therapies by exploiting cerebral plasticity and recovery mechanisms. This retrospective study aims to identify tract-based markers that could serve as predictors of functional outcome following rehabilitation. METHODS: Twenty-nine children with traumatic brain injury (n = 14) or stroke (n = 15) underwent a 3 T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measurement, including Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) between admission to the Hospital and onset of rehabilitation therapy at the Rehabilitation Centre...
October 12, 2016: Brain Imaging and Behavior
Andrew Abboud, Qi Mi, Ava Puccio, David Okonkwo, Marius Buliga, Gregory Constantine, Yoram Vodovotz
Inflammation induced by traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a complex mediator of morbidity and mortality. We have previously demonstrated the utility of both data-driven and mechanistic models in settings of traumatic injury. We hypothesized that differential dynamic inflammation programs characterize TBI survivors vs. non-survivors, and sought to leverage computational modeling to derive novel insights into this life/death bifurcation. Thirteen inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were determined using Luminex™ in serial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 31 TBI patients over 5 days...
2016: Frontiers in Pharmacology
David Salisbury, Simon J Driver, Megan Reynolds, Monica Bennett, Laura B Petrey, Anne Marie Warren
OBJECTIVE: To investigate trends of hospital-based health care utilization after admission to a Level 1 trauma center following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI). DESIGN: Retrospective review. SETTING: Large urban trauma hospital and a hospital council data registry consisting of 88 member institutions (>150 hospitals) covering 15,000 square miles. PARTICIPANTS: All patients admitted to a Level I trauma center between January 2006 - June 2014 who experienced an acute TBI based on ICD-9 coding...
October 6, 2016: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Ding-Kuo Chien, Hei-Fen Hwang, Mau-Roung Lin
This study compared the ability of five injury severity measures, namely the Abbreviated Injury Scale to the Head (AIS-H), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE), and Injury Severity Score (ISS), to predict return-to-work after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Furthermore, factors potentially associated with return-to-work were investigated. In total, 207 individuals aged ≤65 years newly diagnosed with a TBI and employed at the time of injury were recruited and followed-up for 1year by telephone every 3 months...
October 4, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Pedro Andrade, Jari Nissinen, Asla Pitkanen
Sleep disturbances commonly occur after traumatic brain injury and may predispose patients to epileptic seizures. We hypothesized that unprovoked seizure occurrence after traumatic brain injury depends on the sleep-wake cycle, and that the electrographic characteristics of a given sleep stage provide biomarkers for post-traumatic epilepsy. We show in a rat lateral fluid-percussion model that 92% of spontaneous generalized seizures occur during the transition from stage III to rapid-eye-movement sleep. Moreover, a reduction in spindle duration and dominant frequency during the transition stage present as specific and sensitive non-invasive biomarkers for experimentally induced post-traumatic epilepsy with generalized electrographic seizures...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Brandon P Lucke-Wold, Aric F Logsdon, Linda Nguyen, Ahmed Eltanahay, Ryan C Turner, Patrick Bonasso, Chelsea Knotts, Adam Moeck, Joseph C Maroon, Julian E Bailes, Charles L Rosen
Studies using traditional treatment strategies for mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) have produced limited clinical success. Interest in treatment for mild TBI is at an all time high due to its association with the development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and other neurodegenerative diseases, yet therapeutic options remain limited. Traditional pharmaceutical interventions have failed to transition to the clinic for the treatment of mild TBI. As such, many pre-clinical studies are now implementing non-pharmaceutical therapies for TBI...
October 5, 2016: Nutritional Neuroscience
Rita Formisano, Eva Azicnuda, Maryam Khan Sefid, Mauro Zampolini, Federico Scarponi, Renato Avesani
Establish the best time to start rehabilitation by means of scientific evidence. Observational study in patients with a diagnosis of Severe Brain Injury who received intensive inpatient rehabilitation after acute care. 1470 subjects enrolled: 651 with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and 819 with Non-TBI. Male gender was prevalent in the population study, but sex distribution was not different among groups, with a prevalence of male gender in both populations. This project involved 29 rehabilitation facilities for Severe ABI...
October 1, 2016: Neurological Sciences
E Brooks, M H Gendel, A L Parry, S Humphreys, S R Early
BACKGROUND: Physicians are not immune to cognitive impairment. Because of the risks created by practising doctors with these issues, some have suggested developing objective, population-specific measures of evaluation and screening guidelines to assess dysfunction. However, there is very little published information from which to construct such resources. AIMS: To highlight the presentation characteristics and provide evaluation recommendations specific to the needs of physicians with actual or presumed cognitive impairment...
September 30, 2016: Occupational Medicine
Shannon Inglet, Margaret Baldwin, Amie H Quinones, Sarah Majercik, Dave S Collingridge, Joel MacDonald
The use of prophylactic anticonvulsants to prevent early post-traumatic seizures (PTSs) is recommended but inconsistently employed in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The authors evaluated outcomes associated with prophylaxis administration in patients with TBI at a Level 1 trauma center. All patients admitted with TBI from October 2007 through May 2012 were included. Our primary outcome was the incidence of early PTSs. Secondary outcomes included mortality, length of hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) stays, and incidence of late seizures...
August 26, 2016: Curēus
Emilio Russo, Rita Citraro, Andrew Constanti, Antonio Leo, Annika Lüttjohann, Gilles van Luijtelaar, Giovambattista De Sarro
The WAG/Rij rat model has recently gathered attention as a suitable animal model of absence epileptogenesis. This latter term has a broad definition encompassing any possible cause that determines the development of spontaneous seizures; however, most of, if not all, preclinical knowledge on epileptogenesis is confined to the study of post-brain insult models such as traumatic brain injury or post-status epilepticus models. WAG/Rij rats, but also synapsin 2 knockout, Kv7 current-deficient mice represent the first examples of genetic models where an efficacious antiepileptogenic treatment (ethosuximide) was started before seizure onset...
September 26, 2016: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
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