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Bacteria host pathogen

Carolina Moreira Blanco, Bernardo Rodrigues Teixeira, Alexandro Guterres da Silva, Renata Carvalho de Oliveira, Liana Strecht, Maria Ogrzewalska, Elba Regina S de Lemos
Information about tick fauna and monitoring of pathogen prevalences in ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) in various habitat types can enhance knowledge about the epidemiology of tick-borne pathogens in Brazil. This work shows the results of a study of tick parasitism of wild rodents and marsupials collected in seven localities in the southern part of Brazil, within Atlantic Forest and Cerrado biomes. A total of 61 ticks were collected from small mammals, and after identification to the species level, the ticks were individually tested for the presence of bacteria of the genera Rickettsia, Borrelia, family Anaplasmataceae, and protozoa of the genus Babesia...
October 15, 2016: Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases
Tan A Nguyen, Ken C Pang, Seth L Masters
An effective innate immune response relies on the detection of pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by various host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that result in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Viruses and bacteria have co-evolved with the immune system and developed multiple strategies to usurp or circumvent host machinery and blunt the innate immune response in infected cells. Recently, it has become apparent that infected or dying cells can transmit PAMPs and host PRR signalling proteins to uninfected bystander cells to thereby bypass pathogen evasion strategies, and potentiate innate immune signalling...
October 18, 2016: Molecular Immunology
Andrea M Tarnecki, William F Patterson, Covadonga R Arias
BACKGROUND: The microbiota plays an essential role in host health, particularly through competition with opportunistic pathogens. Changes in total bacterial load and microbiota structure can indicate early stages of disease, and information on the composition of bacterial communities is essential to understanding fish health. Although Red Snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) is an economically important species in recreational fisheries and a primary aquaculture candidate, no information is available on the microbial communities of this species...
October 21, 2016: BMC Microbiology
Juan Manuel Bello-López, Facundo Hernández-Rodríguez, Julieta Rojo-Medina
INTRODUCTION: γ-radiation is a method that was originally designed for inactivation of T lymphocytes in blood and blood components in order to prevent transfusion associated-graft versus host disease (TA-GVHD). Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecium and Staphylococcus epidermidis strains are important pathogens in blood banks since they have been related to post-transfusional sepsis. This study was conducted to demonstrate that γ-radiation is effective in reducing the viability of bacteria in platelet concentrates (PC)...
September 29, 2016: Transfusion and Apheresis Science
Çiğdem Yılmaz, Gülay Özcengiz
The discovery of penicillin followed by streptomycin, tetracycline, cephalosporins and other natural, semi-synthetic and synthetic antimicrobials completely revolutionized medicine by reducing human morbidity and mortality from most of the common infections. However, shortly after they were introduced to clinical practice, the development of resistance was emerged. The decreasing interest from antibiotic industry in spite of rapid global emergence of antibiotic resistance is a tough dilemma from the pointview of public health...
October 17, 2016: Biochemical Pharmacology
Kuo-Hsun Chiu, Ling-Hui Wang, Tsung-Ting Tsai, Huan-Yao Lei, Pao-Chi Liao
The secreted proteins of bacteria are usually accompanied by virulence factors, which can cause inflammation and damage host cells. Identifying the secretomes arising from the interactions of bacteria and host cells could, therefore, increase understanding of the mechanisms during initial pathogenesis. The present study used a host-pathogen coculture system of Helicobacter pylori and monocytes (THP-1 cells) to investigate the secreted proteins associated with initial H. pylori pathogenesis. The secreted proteins from the conditioned media from H...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Proteome Research
Noelia Lopez Montero, Jost Enninga
Small GTPases of the Rab protein family control intracellular vesicular trafficking to allow their communication and maintenance. It is a common strategy for intracellular bacteria to exploit these pathways to shape their respective niches for survival. The subversion of Rabs for the generation of an intracellular environment favoring the pathogen has been described almost exclusively for intracellular bacteria that reside within bacterial containing vacuoles (BCVs). However, less is known about Rab subversion for bacteria that rupture the BCV to reach the host cytoplasm...
October 20, 2016: Small GTPases
Kristin Surmann, Marjolaine Simon, Petra Hildebrandt, Henrike Pförtner, Stephan Michalik, Vishnu M Dhople, Barbara M Bröker, Frank Schmidt, Uwe Völker
To simultaneously obtain proteome data of host and pathogen from an internalization experiment, human alveolar epithelial A549 cells were infected with Staphylococcus aureus HG001 which carried a plasmid (pMV158GFP) encoding a continuously expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP). Samples were taken hourly between 1.5 h and 6.5 h post infection. By fluorescence activated cell sorting GFP-expressing bacteria could be enriched from host cell debris, but also infected host cells could be separated from those which did not carry bacteria after contact (exposed)...
June 2016: Data in Brief
Ting Wei, Wenjun Zhan, Limin Cao, Changming Hu, Yangcui Qu, Qian Yu, Hong Chen
Development of a versatile strategy for antibacterial surfaces is of great scientific interest and practical significance. However, few methods can be used to fabricate antibacterial surfaces on substrates of different chemistries and structures. In addition, traditional antibacterial surfaces may suffer problems related to the attached dead bacteria. Herein, antibacterial surfaces with multifunctionality and regenerability are fabricated by a universal strategy. Various substrates are firstly deposited with multilayered films containing guest moieties, which further serve as binding sites for incorporation of biocidal "host" molecules, β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) derivatives modified with quaternary ammonium salt groups (CD-QAS)...
October 19, 2016: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
Grzegorz Majka, Grażyna Więcek, Małgorzata Śróttek, Klaudyna Śpiewak, Małgorzata Brindell, Joanna Koziel, Janusz Marcinkiewicz, Magdalena Strus
Translocation of bacteria, primarily Gram-negative pathogenic flora, from the intestinal lumen into the circulatory system leads to sepsis. In newborns, and especially very low birth weight infants, sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The results of recently conducted clinical trials suggest that lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein that is abundant in mammalian colostrum and milk, may be an effective agent in preventing sepsis in newborns. However, despite numerous basic studies on lactoferrin, very little is known about how metal saturation of this protein affects a host's health...
October 18, 2016: Biometals: An International Journal on the Role of Metal Ions in Biology, Biochemistry, and Medicine
Ia Kusradze, Natia Karumidze, Sophio Rigvava, Teona Dvalidze, Malkhaz Katsitadze, Irakli Amiranashvili, Marina Goderdzishvili
Acinetobacter baumannii is a gram-negative, non-motile bacterium that, due to its multidrug resistance, has become a major nosocomial pathogen. The increasing number of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains has renewed interest in phage therapy. The aim of our study was to assess the effectiveness of phage administration in Acinetobacter baumannii wound infections in an animal model to demonstrate phage therapy as non-toxic, safe and alternative antibacterial remedy. Using classical methods for the study of bacteriophage properties, we characterized phage vB-GEC_Ab-M-G7 as a dsDNA myovirus with a 90 kb genome size...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
Alejandro Romero, Paolo R Saraceni, Susana Merino, Antonio Figueras, Juan M Tomás, Beatriz Novoa
The selection of an experimental animal model is of great importance in the study of bacterial virulence factors. Here, a bath infection of zebrafish larvae is proposed as an alternative model to study the virulence factors of Aeromonas hydrophila. Intraperitoneal infections in mice and trout were compared with bath infections in zebrafish larvae using specific mutants. The great advantage of this model is that bath immersion mimics the natural route of infection, and injury to the tail also provides a natural portal of entry for the bacteria...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
Darja Kušar, Karin Šrimpf, Petra Isaković, Lina Kalšek, Javid Hosseini, Irena Zdovc, Tina Kotnik, Modest Vengušt, Gabrijela Tavčar-Kalcher
BACKGROUND: Bacterial intercellular communication, called quorum sensing, takes place via the production and collective response to signal molecules. In Gram-negative bacteria, like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, these signaling molecules are N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). P. aeruginosa is a common cause of inflammation of the ear canal (otitis externa) in dogs. It employs quorum sensing to coordinate the expression of host tissue-damaging factors, which are largely responsible for its virulence...
October 18, 2016: BMC Veterinary Research
Irfan Ahmad, Syed Fazle Rouf, Lei Sun, Annika Cimdins, Sulman Shafeeq, Soazig Le Guyon, Marco Schottkowski, Mikael Rhen, Ute Römling
BACKGROUND: Cellulose, a 1,4 beta-glucan polysaccharide, is produced by a variety of organisms including bacteria. Although the production of cellulose has a high biological, ecological and economical impact, regulatory mechanisms of cellulose biosynthesis are mostly unknown. Family eight cellulases are regularly associated with cellulose biosynthesis operons in bacteria; however, their function is poorly characterized. In this study, we analysed the role of the cellulase BcsZ encoded by the bcsABZC cellulose biosynthesis operon of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S...
October 19, 2016: Microbial Cell Factories
Dayoung Park, Narine Arabyan, Cynthia C Williams, Ting Song, Anupam Mitra, Bart C Weimer, Emanual Maverakis, Carlito B Lebrilla
Although gut host-pathogen interactions are glycan-mediated processes, few details are known about the participating structures. Here we employ high-resolution mass spectrometric profiling to comprehensively identify and quantitatively measure the exact modifications of native intestinal epithelial cell surface N-glycans induced by S. Typhimurium infection. Sixty minutes post-infection, select sialylated structures showed decreases in terms of total number and abundances. To assess the effect of cell surface mannosylation, we selectively rerouted glycan expression on the host using the alpha-mannosidase inhibitor, kifunensine, toward overexpression of high mannose...
October 17, 2016: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics: MCP
Laura Julia Starost, Sascha Karassek, Yasuteru Sano, Takashi Kanda, Kwang Sik Kim, Ulrich Dobrindt, Christian Rüter, Marcus Alexander Schmidt
Pertussis toxin (PTx), the major virulence factor of the whooping cough-causing bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis, permeabilizes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro and in vivo. Breaking barriers might promote translocation of meningitis-causing bacteria across the BBB, thereby facilitating infection. PTx activates several host cell signaling pathways exploited by the neonatal meningitis-causing Escherichia coli K1-RS218 for invasion and translocation across the BBB. Here, we investigated whether PTx and E...
October 13, 2016: Toxins
Jeremy Woodward, Effrossyni Gkrania-Klotsas, Dinakantha Kumararatne
Chronic infection with Norovirus is emerging as a significant risk for patients with immunodeficiency - either primary or secondary to therapeutic immunosuppression. Patients with primary immunodeficiency present a range of pathological responses to Norovirus infection. Asymptomatic infections occur and differentiating viral carriage or prolonged viral shedding after self-limiting infection from infection causing protracted diarrhoea can be challenging due to relatively mild pathological changes that may mimic other causes of diarrhoea in such patients (for instance pathogenic bacteria or parasites or graft-versus-host disease)...
October 18, 2016: Clinical and Experimental Immunology
Virtu Solano-Collado, Mário Hüttener, Manuel Espinosa, Antonio Juárez, Alicia Bravo
Global regulators play an essential role in the adaptation of bacterial cells to specific niches. Bacterial pathogens thriving in the tissues and organs of their eukaryotic hosts are a well-studied example. Some of the proteins that recognize local DNA structures rather than specific nucleotide sequences act as global modulators in many bacteria, both Gram-negative and -positive. To this class of regulators belong the H-NS-like proteins, mainly identified in γ-Proteobacteria, and the MgaSpn-like proteins identified in Firmicutes...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences
Pankaj Trivedi, Chanda Trivedi, Jasmine Grinyer, Ian C Anderson, Brajesh K Singh
Plant health and productivity is strongly influenced by their intimate interaction with deleterious and beneficial organisms, including microbes, and insects. Of the various plant diseases, insect-vectored diseases are of particular interest, including those caused by obligate parasites affecting plant phloem such as Candidatus (Ca.) Phytoplasma species and several species of Ca. Liberibacter. Recent studies on plant-microbe and plant-insect interactions of these pathogens have demonstrated that plant-microbe-insect interactions have far reaching consequences for the functioning and evolution of the organisms involved...
2016: Frontiers in Plant Science
Martin Aepfelbacher, Manuel Wolters
Pathogenic bacteria of the genus Yersinia include Y. pestis-the agent of plaque-and two enteropathogens, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis. These pathogens have developed an array of virulence factors aimed at manipulating Rho GTP-binding proteins and the actin cytoskeleton in host cells to cross the intestinal barrier and suppress the immune system. Yersinia virulence factors include outer membrane proteins triggering cell invasion by binding to integrins, effector proteins injected into host cells to manipulate Rho protein functions and a Rho protein-activating exotoxin...
October 16, 2016: Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology
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