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combat hemorrhage control

Z Adamiak, D Bukowiecka, P Jastrzębski, M Jałyński, P Holak, J Głodek, G Gudzbeler
Hemorrhaging from large vessels poses a serious problem in emergency situations when blood loss needs to be immediately controlled. The aim of the study was to compare the effectiveness of two hemostatic dressings in controlling bleeding from a surgically punctured femoral artery. The study was performed on thirteen pigs divided into two groups, of six and seven pigs, respectively. Combat gauze covered with ChitoClear hqg 95 chitosan and Protanal LF10/60 FT sodium alginate was used in the first group, seton covered with identical substances was uses in the second group...
September 1, 2016: Polish Journal of Veterinary Sciences
Jason S Radowsky, Carlos J Rodriguez, Gary G Wind, Eric A Elster
The application of lessons learned on the battlefield for timely surgical control of lower extremity hemorrhage secondary to blast injuries to the civilian practice for similar wounding patterns from industrial accidents or terrorist activities is imperative. Although simple cut-down procedures are commonly sufficient for the control of blood vessels for distal extremity traumatic amputations, high-thigh or disarticulation wounding patterns often require more complex surgical methods. The following details both the decision-making process and operative techniques for controlling hemorrhage from lower extremity blast injuries...
October 2016: Military Medicine
T L Landsman, T Touchet, S M Hasan, C Smith, B Russell, J Rivera, D J Maitland, E Cosgriff-Hernandez
: Uncontrolled hemorrhage accounts for more than 30% of trauma deaths worldwide. Current hemostatic devices focus primarily on time to hemostasis, but prevention of bacterial infection is also critical for improving survival rates. In this study, we sought to improve on current devices used for hemorrhage control by combining the large volume-filling capabilities and rapid clotting of shape memory polymer (SMP) foams with the swelling capacity of hydrogels. In addition, a hydrogel composition was selected that readily complexes with elemental iodine to impart bactericidal properties to the device...
October 6, 2016: Acta Biomaterialia
Michael J Beltran, Tyson E Becker, Richard K Hurley, Jennifer M Gurney, Roman A Hayda
Hemorrhage continues to be the most common cause of death among service members wounded in combat. Injuries that were previously nonsurvivable in previous wars are now routinely seen by combat surgeons in forward surgical units, the result of improvements in body armor, the universal use of field tourniquets to control extremity hemorrhage at the point of injury, and rapid air evacuation strategies. Combat orthopaedic surgeons remain a vital aspect of the forward surgical unit, tasked with assisting general surgical colleagues in the resuscitation of patients in hemorrhagic shock while also addressing traumatic amputations, open and closed long bone fractures, and mechanically unstable pelvic trauma...
October 2016: Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma
Mustafa Uğur, Seçkin Akküçük, Yavuz Savaş Koca, Cem Oruç, Akın Aydoğan, Erol Kılıç, İbrahim Yetim, Muhyittin Temiz
BACKGROUND: Transport of casualties from a combat area to a fully equipped hospital where all techniques of damage control surgery (DCS) can be performed requires a great deal of time. Therefore, prior to transport, prompt control of hemorrhage and contamination should be achieved, and resuscitative procedures should be performed at the nearest health center. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the location at which DCS was performed on rates of mortality. METHODS: The present retrospective study included 51 combat casualties who underwent DCS at the present clinic or at hospitals nearest the combat area due to high kinetic energy gunshot injuries to the abdomen between 2010 and 2015...
May 2016: Ulusal Travma Ve Acil Cerrahi Dergisi, Turkish Journal of Trauma & Emergency Surgery: TJTES
Raymond Devlin, Laura Bonanno, Jennifer Badeaux
BACKGROUND: Rapid replacement of blood loss is critical in patients suffering from traumatic hemorrhage. When the availability of blood products is limited, certain interventions have shown promise in conserving blood supplies. Recombinant factor (rF) VIIa has been administered, as an off-label use, to assist in controlling hemorrhage in trauma patients. Although rFVIIa has a tendency to remain localized to areas of vascular insult, there may be an increase in thromboembolism formation when patients suffer multiple sites of injury as seen in blunt force trauma...
March 2016: JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports
Erez N Baruch, John F Kragh, Amy L Berg, James K Aden, Avi Benov, Avi Shina, Amir Shlaifer, Alon Ahimor, Elon Glassberg, Avraham Yitzhak
OBJECTIVE: Tourniquet application is a lifesaving skill taught worldwide in first aid bleeding control courses. We observed performance among non-medical users of tourniquets in their confidence, competence, and reasons for failure. METHODS: 179 Israeli military recruits without prior medical training underwent their standard first aid course where they learned Combat Application Tourniquet (CAT; Composite Resources, Rock Hill, SC, USA) use. After course completion, they self-reported confidence in tourniquet use...
August 5, 2016: Prehospital Emergency Care
Rachel L Choron, Joshua P Hazelton, Krystal Hunter, Lisa Capano-Wehrle, John Gaughan, John Chovanes, Mark J Seamon
BACKGROUND: Intra-abdominal packing with laparotomy pads (LP) is a common and rapid method for hemorrhage control in critically injured patients. Combat Gauze™ and Trauma Pads™ ([QC] Z-Medica QuikClot(®)) are kaolin impregnated hemostatic agents, that in addition to LP, may improve hemorrhage control. While QC packing has been effective in a swine liver injury model, QC remains unstudied for human intra-abdominal use. We hypothesized QC packing during damage control laparotomy (DCL) better controls hemorrhage than standard packing and is safe for intracorporeal use...
July 21, 2016: Injury
Michelle E Olsen, Claire Marie Filone, Dan Rozelle, Chad E Mire, Krystle N Agans, Lisa Hensley, John H Connor
UNLABELLED: Ebolavirus (EBOV) is an RNA virus that is known to cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and other primates : EBOV successfully enters and replicates in many cell types. This replication is dependent on the virus successfully coopting a number of cellular factors. Many of these factors are currently unidentified but represent potential targets for antiviral therapeutics. Here we show that cellular polyamines are critical for EBOV replication. We found that small-molecule inhibitors of polyamine synthesis block gene expression driven by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase...
2016: MBio
Rudy Gibson, James K Aden, Michael A Dubick, John F Kragh
BACKGROUND: Emergency tourniquet use has been associated with hemorrhage control and improved survival during the wars since 2001, but little is known of the differential performance of pneumatic tourniquet models. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of three models of pneumatic tourniquets in a laboratory setting to aid a possible decision to field test suitable models for medic preference. METHODS: A laboratory experiment was designed to test the effectiveness of tourniquets on a manikin thigh...
2016: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
Thomas Peponis, Elie Ramly, Kym A Roth, David R King
BACKGROUND: Chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear threats (CBRNs) are uncommon; however, Special Operations Forces (SOF) are likely at the highest risk for tactical exposure. In the event of exposure, SOF will rely on the Joint Service Lightweight Integrated Suit Technology (JSLIST) for survival. Doctrine dictates that a tourniquet should be applied over the JSLIST after a severe limb injury with hemorrhage. There is no evidence in the literature that the Combat Application Tourniquet (C-A-T), which is currently the most widely available tourniquet on the battlefield, can effectively occlude arterial blood flow when applied over the JSLIST...
2016: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
Robert T Gerhardt, Elon Glassberg, John B Holcomb, Robert L Mabry, Martin B Schreiber, Philip C Spinella
BACKGROUND: Uncontrolled major hemorrhage and delayed evacuation remain substantial contributors to potentially survivable combat death, along with mission, environment, terrain, logistics, and hostile action. Life-saving interventions and the onset of acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) may also contribute. OBJECTIVE: Analyze US casualty records from the DoD Trauma Registry, using International Normalized Ratio (INR) of 1.5 for onset of ATC. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study from September 2007 to June 2011, inclusive...
September 2016: Shock
Jayne R Stevens, Joseph Brennan
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to highlight recent literature related to the initial management and reconstruction of blast injuries to the head and neck. RECENT FINDINGS: An increasing percentage of combat-related injuries are caused by blast trauma. Management of blast trauma over the last 10 years has improved understanding of the unique nature of these injuries and the importance of thoughtful management and reconstruction. Blast trauma is associated with an increased need for definitive airway management...
October 2016: Current Opinion in Otolaryngology & Head and Neck Surgery
Jennifer Leonard, John Zietlow, David Morris, Kathleen Berns, Steven Eyer, Kurt Martinson, Donald Jenkins, Scott Zietlow
BACKGROUND: Life-threatening hemorrhage is a leading cause of preventable mortality in trauma patients. Since publication of the Hartford Consensus statement, there has been intense interest in civilian use of commercial hemostatic gauze and tourniquets. Although the military has studied their use on soldiers with wartime injuries, there are limited data on patient outcomes following civilian prehospital use and no data on the use in rural trauma. METHODS: We performed a multi-institutional retrospective analysis of clinical outcomes following prehospital use of QuikClot combat gauze (QC) and combat application tourniquets (CATs) from 2009 to 2014...
September 2016: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
John F Kragh, Matthew P Lunati, Chetan U Kharod, Cord W Cunningham, Jeffrey A Bailey, Zsolt T Stockinger, Andrew P Cap, Jacob Chen, James K Aden, Leopoldo C Cancio
UNLABELLED: Introduction To aid in preparation of military medic trainers for a possible new curriculum in teaching junctional tourniquet use, the investigators studied the time to control hemorrhage and blood volume lost in order to provide evidence for ease of use. Hypothesis Models of junctional tourniquet could perform differentially by blood loss, time to hemostasis, and user preference. METHODS: In a laboratory experiment, 30 users controlled simulated hemorrhage from a manikin (Combat Ready Clamp [CRoC] Trainer) with three iterations each of three junctional tourniquets...
August 2016: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine
John F Kragh, Michael A Dubick
Bleeding prevention and control by tourniquet use by out-of-hospital caregivers is a major breakthrough in military medicine of current wars. The present review documents developments in tourniquet practices since 2001 among the US military services for aid in improving doctrine, policy, and especially care in wars to come. Tourniquets are an adjunct for resuscitation in self-care and buddy aid and today are issued to all military servicepersons who deploy into a combat zone. In the US Army, virtually every Soldier is trained in first aid tourniquet use; since 2009 they are instructed early and often to use them early and often...
April 2016: U.S. Army Medical Department Journal
James R Baylis, Alexander E St John, Xu Wang, Esther B Lim, Matthew L Statz, Diana Chien, Eric Simonson, Susan A Stern, Richard T Liggins, Nathan J White, Christian J Kastrup
Hemorrhage is the leading cause of preventable death in trauma, and hemorrhage from noncompressible junctional anatomic sites is particularly difficult to control. The current standard is QuikClot Combat Gauze packing, which requires 3 min of compression. We have created a novel dressing with calcium carbonate microparticles that can disperse and self-propel upstream against flowing blood. We loaded these microparticles with thrombin and tranexamic acid and tested their efficacy in a swine arterial bleeding model without wound compression...
September 2016: Shock
Alexander J Burdette, Ruth Madelaine Paredes, Randy F Crossland, Antoni R Macko, James Aden, Forest R Sheppard
BACKGROUND: Uncontrolled hemorrhage (UH), the leading cause of potentially survivable combat-related death, elicits a deleterious inflammatory response. Our group previously reported an increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in a novel non-human primate model of UH; however, to better understand the molecular profile of the inflammatory response to UH, we performed a comprehensive evaluation of inflammation at the proteomic and transcriptomic level. METHODS: Anesthetized rhesus macaques (n = 8) underwent UH by 60% left lobe hepatectomy T = 0 min...
September 2016: Shock
Luis Martinez-Sobrido, Juan Carlos de la Torre
INTRODUCTION: Several arenaviruses, chiefly Lassa virus (LASV), cause hemorrhagic fever (HF) disease in humans and pose significant public health problems in their endemic regions. Moreover, HF arenaviruses represent credible biodefense threats. There are not FDA-approved arenavirus vaccines and current anti-arenaviral therapy is limited to an off-label use of ribavirin that is only partially effective. AREAS COVERED: Live-attenuated vaccines (LAV) represent the most feasible approach to control HF arenaviruses within their endemic regions...
September 2016: Expert Review of Vaccines
Joseph F Rappold, Grant V Bochicchio
Despite the tremendous advances and successes in the care of combat casualties over the past 15 years of war, noncompressible torso hemorrhage (NCTH) remains the most likely source of potentially preventable death (approx. 25%) on the battlefield. This is also likely true for civilian victims of blunt and penetrating trauma. Various devices and therapeutic interventions have been, and are being, developed in an attempt to reduce morbidity and mortality for patients with NCTH. Examples include the use of prehospital blood and blood products, tranexamic acid, specially designed tourniquets for junctional hemorrhage control, retrograde endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta, intracavity foam, expandable hemostatic sponges, and intravascular nanoparticles to suspended animation...
April 2016: Transfusion
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