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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29912454/the-need-for-a-combat-casualty-care-research-program-and-trauma-registry-for-military-working-dogs
#1
Jean A Orman, Jacquelyn S Parker, Zsolt T Stockinger, Kevin W Nemelka
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 15, 2018: Military Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29905597/extremity-war-injuries-xii-homeland-defense-as-a-translation-of-war-lessons-learned
#2
Maj Daniel J Stinner, Andrew H Schmidt
The 12th Extremity War Injuries Symposium focused on issues related to the transitions in medical care that are occurring as the focus of the war on terror changes. The symposium highlighted the results of Department of Defense-funded research in musculoskeletal injury, the evolution of combat casualty care, and the readiness of the fighting force. Presentations and discussions focused on force readiness of both troops and their medical support as well as the maintenance of the combat care expertise that has been developed during the previous decade of conflict...
June 12, 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29889961/survey-of-casualty-evacuation-missions-conducted-by-the-160th-special-operations-aviation-regiment-during-the-afghanistan-conflict
#3
Theodore T Redman, Kevin E Mayberry, Alejandra G Mora, Brock A Benedict, Elliot M Ross, Julian G Mapp, Russ S Kotwal
BACKGROUND: Historically, documentation of prehospital combat casualty care has been relatively nonexistent. Without documentation, performance improvement of prehospital care and evacuation through data collection, consolidation, and scientific analyses cannot be adequately accomplished. During recent conflicts, prehospital documentation has received increased attention for point-of-injury care as well as for care provided en route on medical evacuation platforms. However, documentation on casualty evacuation (CASEVAC) platforms is still lacking...
2018: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29889957/old-tricks-for-new-dogs-john-caddy-and-the-victorian-origins-of-tccc
#4
Penny S Reynolds
The success of Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) in reducing potentially preventable combat deaths may rely on both specific interventions (such as tourniquets) and the systematized application of immediate care. Essential elements of a combat care system include clear specification of immediate care priorities, standardized methodology, and inclusion and training of all nonmedical personnel in early response. Although TCCC is fairly recent, the construct is similar to that first suggested during the mid-nineteenth century by John Turner Caddy (1822-1902), a British Royal Navy staff surgeon...
2018: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29889956/prehospital-administration-of-antibiotic-prophylaxis-for-open-combat-wounds-in-afghanistan-2013-2014
#5
Steven G Schauer, Andrew D Fisher, Michael D April, Katherine A Stolper, Cord W Cunningham, Robert Carter, Jessie Renee D Fernandez, James A Pfaff
BACKGROUND: Military operations place injured Servicemembers at high risk for open wounds. Austere environments and initial wound contamination increase the risk for infection. Wound infections continue to cause significant morbidity among injured Servicemembers. Limited evidence suggests that early antibiotic therapy for open wounds reduces infection rates. METHODS: We obtained data from the Prehospital Trauma Registry (PHTR) from January 2013 through September 2014...
2018: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29889952/management-of-suspected-tension-pneumothorax-in-tactical-combat-casualty-care-tccc-guidelines-change-17-02
#6
Frank K Butler, John B Holcomb, Stacy Shackelford, Harold R Montgomery, Shawn Anderson, Jeffrey S Cain, Howard R Champion, Cord W Cunningham, Warren C Dorlac, Brendon Drew, Kurt Edwards, John V Gandy, Elon Glassberg, Jennifer Gurney, Theodore Harcke, Donald A Jenkins, Jay Johannigman, Bijan S Kheirabadi, Russ S Kotwal, Lanny F Littlejohn, Matthew Martin, Edward L Mazuchowski, Edward J Otten, Travis Polk, Peter Rhee, Jason M Seery, Zsolt Stockinger, Jeremy Torrisi, Avi Yitzak, Ken Zafren, Scott P Zietlow
This change to the Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) Guidelines that updates the recommendations for management of suspected tension pneumothorax for combat casualties in the prehospital setting does the following things: (1) Continues the aggressive approach to suspecting and treating tension pneumothorax based on mechanism of injury and respiratory distress that TCCC has advocated for in the past, as opposed to waiting until shock develops as a result of the tension pneumothorax before treating. The new wording does, however, emphasize that shock and cardiac arrest may ensue if the tension pneumothorax is not treated promptly...
2018: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29863446/early-infections-complicating-the-care-of-combat-casualties-from-iraq-and-afghanistan
#7
Amy C Weintrob, Clinton K Murray, Jiahong Xu, Margot Krauss, William Bradley, Tyler E Warkentien, Bradley A Lloyd, David R Tribble
BACKGROUND: During the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, more than 52,000 U.S. military members were wounded in action. The battlefield mortality rate was lower than in past conflicts, however, those surviving often had complex soft tissue and bone injuries requiring multiple surgeries. This report describes the rates, types, and risks of infections complicating the care of combat casualties. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Infection and microbiology data obtained from the Trauma Infectious Disease Outcomes Study (TIDOS), a prospective observational study of infections complicating deployment-related injuries, were used to determine the proportion of infection, types, and associated organisms...
April 2018: Surgical Infections
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29851907/a-us-military-role-2-forward-surgical-team-database-study-of-combat-mortality-in-afghanistan
#8
Russ S Kotwal, Amanda M Staudt, Edward L Mazuchowski, Jennifer M Gurney, Stacy A Shackelford, Frank K Butler, Zsolt T Stockinger, John B Holcomb, Shawn C Nessen, Elizabeth A Mann-Salinas
BACKGROUND: Timely and optimal care can reduce mortality among critically injured combat casualties. US military Role 2 surgical teams were deployed to forward positions in Afghanistan on behalf of the battlefield trauma system. They received prehospital casualties, provided early damage control resuscitation and surgery, and rapidly transferred casualties to Role 3 hospitals for definitive care. A database was developed to capture Role 2 data. METHODS: A retrospective review and descriptive analysis was conducted of battle-injured casualties transported to US Role 2 surgical facilities in Afghanistan from February 2008 to September 2014...
May 30, 2018: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29787545/recent-advances-in-austere-combat-surgery-use-of-aortic-balloon-occlusion-as-well-as-blood-challenges-by-special-operations-medical-forces-in-recent-combat-operations
#9
D Marc Northern, Justin D Manley, Regan Lyon, Daniel Farber, Benjamin J Mitchell, Kristopher J Filak, Jonathan Lundy, Joe J DuBose, Todd E Rasmussen, John B Holcomb
BACKGROUND: Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) for control of non-compressible torso hemorrhage is a technology that is increasingly being utilized in the combat casualty setting. Its use in the resource restricted environment holds potential to improve hemorrhage control, decrease blood product utilization, decrease morbidity, and improve combat mortality. The objective of this report is to present the single largest series of REBOA use on severely injured combat casualties...
April 30, 2018: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29753547/an-analysis-of-casualties-presenting-to-military-emergency-departments-in-iraq-and-afghanistan
#10
Steven G Schauer, Jason F Naylor, Joshua J Oliver, Joseph K Maddry, Michael D April
BACKGROUND: During the past 17 years of conflict the deployed US military health care system has found new and innovative ways to reduce combat mortality down to the lowest case fatality rate in US history. There is currently a data dearth of emergency department (ED) care delivered in this setting. We seek to describe ED interventions in this setting. METHODS: We used a series of ED procedure codes to identify subjects within the Department of Defense Trauma Registry from January 2007 to August 2016...
May 2, 2018: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29740959/preparedness-for-treating-victims-of-terrorist-attacks-in-australia-learning-from-recent-military-experience
#11
Jeffrey V Rosenfeld, Biswadev Mitra, De Villiers Smit, Mark C Fitzgerald, Benjamin Butson, Michael Stephenson, Michael C Reade
The Australian health system is generally well prepared for mass casualty events. Fortunately, there have been very few terrorist attacks and these have involved low numbers of casualties compared with events overseas. Nevertheless, Australian health professionals need to be prepared to treat mass casualties with blast and ballistic trauma. The US military and its allies including Australia have had extensive experience with mass casualty management in the Middle East and Afghanistan wars for more than a decade...
May 9, 2018: Emergency Medicine Australasia: EMA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29717911/epidemiology-of-trauma-related-infections-among-a-combat-casualty-cohort-after-initial-hospitalization-the-trauma-infectious-disease-outcomes-study
#12
David R Tribble, Margot R Krauss, Clinton K Murray, Tyler E Warkentien, Bradley A Lloyd, Anuradha Ganesan, Lauren Greenberg, Jiahong Xu, Ping Li, M Leigh Carson, William Bradley, Amy C Weintrob
BACKGROUND: The Trauma Infectious Disease Outcomes Study (TIDOS) cohort follows military personnel with deployment-related injuries in order to evaluate short- and long-term infectious complications. High rates of infectious complications have been observed in more than 30% of injured patients during initial hospitalization. We present data on infectious complications related to combat trauma after the initial period of hospitalization. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data related to patient care for military personnel injured during combat operations between June 2009 and May 2012 were collected...
May 2, 2018: Surgical Infections
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29691106/impact-of-prehospital-airway-management-on-combat-mortality
#13
Garrett B Hardy, Joseph K Maddry, Patrick C Ng, Shelia C Savell, Allyson A Arana, Avery Kester, Vikhyat S Bebarta
INTRODUCTION: Analysis of modern military conflicts suggests that airway compromise remains the second leading cause of preventable death of combat fatalities. This study compares outcomes of combat casualties that received prehospital airway interventions, specifically bag valve mask (BVM) ventilation, cricothyrotomy, and supraglottic airway (SGA) placement. The goal is to compare the effectiveness of airway management strategies used in the military pre-hospital setting. METHODS: This retrospective chart review of 1267 US Army medical evacuation patient care records, compared outcomes of casualties that received prehospital advanced airway interventions...
June 2018: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29676615/walter-b-cannon-s-world-war-i-experience-treatment-of-traumatic-shock-then-and-now
#14
Kathy L Ryan
Walter B. Cannon (1871-1945), perhaps America's preeminent physiologist, volunteered for service with the Army Expeditionary Force (AEF) during World War I. He initially served with Base Hospital No. 5, a unit made up of Harvard clinicians, before moving forward to the front lines to serve at a casualty clearing station run by the British. During his time there, he performed research on wounded soldiers to understand the nature and causes of traumatic shock. Subsequently, Cannon performed animal experimentation on the causes of traumatic shock in the London laboratory of Dr...
June 1, 2018: Advances in Physiology Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29662256/analysis-of-combat-casualties-admitted-to-the-emergency-department-during-the-negotiation-of-the-comprehensive-colombian-process-of-peace
#15
Carlos A Ordoñez, Ramiro Manzano Nunez, Michael W Parra, Juan Pablo Herrera, Maria Paula Naranjo, Sara Sofia Escobar, Marisol Badiel, Monica Morales, Cecibel Cevallos, Juan G Bayona, Alvaro Ignacio Sanchez, Juan Carlos Puyana, Alberto F García
Aim: Our objective was to describe the variations in casualties admitted to the emergency department during the period of the negotiation of the comprehensive peace agreement in Colombia between 2011 and 2016. Methods: A retrospective study of all hostile military casualties managed at a regional Level I trauma center from January 2011 to December 2016. Patients were subsequently divided into two groups: those seen before the declaration of the process of peace truce (November 2012) and those after (negotiation period)...
December 30, 2017: Colombia Médica: CM
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29626144/safest-light-in-a-combat-area-while-performing-intravenous-access-in-the-dark
#16
Attila Aydin, S Bilge, M Eryilmaz
INTRODUCTION: Cannulation for the administration of intravenous fluids is integral to the prehospital management of injured military patients. However, this may be technically challenging to undertake during night-time conditions where the use of light to aid cannulation may give the tactical situation away to opponents. The aim of this study was to investigate the success and tactical safety of venepuncture under battlefield conditions with different colour light sources. METHOD: The procedure was carried out with naked eye in a bright room in the absence of a separate light source, with a naked eye in a dark room under red, white, blue and green light sources and under an infrared light source while wearing night vision goggles (NVGs)...
April 6, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29618112/critical-care-in-the-military-health-system-a-survey-based-summary-of-critical-care-services
#17
Jason J Nam, Christopher J Colombo, Cristin A Mount, Elizabeth A Mann-Salinas, Ferdinand Bacomo, Adam W Bostick, Konrad Davis, James K Aden, Kevin K Chung, Mary S McCarthy, Jeremy C Pamplin
Introduction: Critical care is an important component of in-patient and combat casualty care, and it is a major contributor to U.S. healthcare costs. Regular exposure to critically ill and injured patients may directly contribute to wartime skills retention for military caregivers. Data describing critical care services in the Military Health System (MHS), however, is lacking. This study was undertaken to describe MHS critical care services, their resource utilization, and differences in care practices amongst military treatment facilities (MTFs)...
March 29, 2018: Military Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29606685/en-route-critical-care-transfer-from-a-role-2-to-a-role-3-medical-treatment-facility-in-afghanistan
#18
Amanda M Staudt, Shelia C Savell, Kimberly A Biever, Jennifer D Trevino, Krystal K Valdez-Delgado, Mithun Suresh, Jennifer M Gurney, Stacy A Shackelford, Joseph K Maddry, Elizabeth A Mann-Salinas
BACKGROUND: En route care is the transfer of patients requiring combat casualty care within the US military evacuation system. No reports have been published about en route care of patients during transfer from a forward surgical facility (role 2) to a combat support hospital (role 3) for comprehensive care. OBJECTIVE: To describe patients transferred from a role 2 to a role 3 US military treatment facility in Afghanistan. METHODS: A retrospective review of data from the Joint Trauma System Role 2 Database was conducted...
April 2018: Critical Care Nurse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29606684/en-route-care-provided-by-us-navy-nurses-in-iraq-and-afghanistan
#19
Virginia S Blackman, Benjamin D Walrath, Lauren K Reeves, Alejandra G Mora, Joseph K Maddry, Zsolt T Stockinger
BACKGROUND: US Navy nurses provide en route care for critically injured combat casualties without having a formal program for training, utilization, or evaluation. Little is known about missions supported by Navy nurses. OBJECTIVES: To characterize the number and types of patients transported and skill sets required by Navy nurses during 2 combat support deployments. METHODS: All interfacility casualty transfers between 2 separate facilities in Iraq and Afghanistan were assessed...
April 2018: Critical Care Nurse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29606674/reducing-the-risk-for-pressure-injury-during-combat-evacuation
#20
Elizabeth Bridges, JoAnne D Whitney, Robert Burr, Ernesto Tolentino
BACKGROUND: Combat casualties undergoing aeromedical evacuation are at increased risk for pressure injuries. The risk factors pressure and shear are potentially modifiable via solutions appropriate for en route care. OBJECTIVES: To compare transcutaneous oxygen levels and skin temperatures in healthy participants under offloaded (side lying) and loaded (supine or supine with 30° backrest elevation) under 4 conditions: control (no intervention), Mepilex sacral and heel dressings, LiquiCell pad, and Mepilex plus LiquiCell...
April 2018: Critical Care Nurse
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