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orthopaedic war

Benjamin W Hoyt, Gabriel J Pavey, Benjamin K Potter, Jonathan A Forsberg
Heterotopic ossification, the formation of bone in soft tissues, is a common complication of the high-energy extremity trauma sustained in modern armed conflict. In the past 15 years, military treatment facilities and aligned laboratories have been in a unique position to study and treat this process due to the high volume of patients with these injuries secondary to blast trauma. The devastating nature of these wounds has limited traditional therapeutic options, necessitating alternative solutions to prophylaxis and initial treatment producing substantial advances in modeling, prophylaxis, detection, and therapy...
February 17, 2018: Bone
Todd O McKinley, Jean-Claude DʼAlleyrand, Ian Valerio, Seth Schoebel, Kevin Tetsworth, Eric A Elster
In 16 years of conflict, primarily in Iraq and Afghanistan, wounded warriors have primarily been subjected to blast type of injuries. Evacuation strategies have led to unprecedented survival rates in blast-injured soldiers, resulting in large numbers of wounded warriors with complex limb trauma. Bone and soft tissue defects have resulted in increased use of complex reconstructive algorithms to restore limbs and function. In addition, in failed salvage attempts, advances in amputation options are being developed...
March 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma
G Scharf
"How wide and varied is the experience of the battlefield and how fertile the blood of warriors in raising good surgeons" Sir Clifford Allbutt (1898). With these sentiments of the medical lessons learned in war and conflict, with the background of the poem of "In Flanders Field", written by a doctor who had South African War connections, reasons (the Somme and third Ypres battles) will be given that this was indeed a "GREAT WAR" as the world history, weapons, strategy, tactics and wounding patterns had changed dramatically...
September 2017: South African Journal of Surgery. Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif Vir Chirurgie
Marek Durakiewicz, Mirosław Jabłoński, Aneta Zarębska
On May 16, 1914, The Lancet Journal published a paper by Romuald Węgłowski, a Polish-born professor of Moscow University, entitled "Malignant tumours of bones: a new method in conservative operative treatment." The idea of biological resection presented in the paper consisted in thermocoagulation of the apparently cancerous part of a bone with a jet of steam. According to the author, dead bone rid of live malignant cells reconstructed itself quickly, which helped to preserve the functionality of the organ without considerable limitations...
April 12, 2017: Ortopedia, Traumatologia, Rehabilitacja
Abigail C L Magrill, Naoki Nakano, Vikas Khanduja
BACKGROUND & PURPOSE: Increasing our appreciation of the historical foundations of hip arthroscopy offers greater insight and understanding of the field's current and future applications. This article offers a broad history of the progress of hip arthroscopy. METHODS: Hip arthroscopy's development from the early technologies of endoscopy to the present day is described through a review of the available literature. RESULTS: Endoscopic science begins with the Lichtleiter, developed by Phillip Bozzini (1779-1809) in 1806, but endoscopes were not applied to joints until 1912, as presented by Severin Nordentoft (1866-1922)...
October 2017: International Orthopaedics
David P Green, Jesse C DeLee
On April 6, 1917, the United States declared war on Germany and entered what was then called the Great War. Among the first officers sent to Europe were 21 orthopaedic surgeons in the so-called First Goldthwait Unit. Prior to the war, orthopaedics had been a nonoperative "strap-and-buckle" specialty that dealt primarily with infections, congenital abnormalities, and posttraumatic deformity. The Great War changed all of that forever, creating a new surgical specialty with emphasis on acute treatment, prevention of deformity, restoration of function, and rehabilitation...
April 5, 2017: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume
Todd P Pierce, Kimona Issa, Yasmine Rifai, Bartlomiej Szczech
Orthopaedic trauma accounts for a great deal of disability worldwide. There are many impoverished nations affected by war wherein victims suffer blast injuries associated with mines, missiles, high-powered gunshots, and bombings. One way to address this is through international medical missions sponsored by industrialized nations. It is imperative that practitioners have a basic understanding of the type of injuries that may be encountered in these nations impacted by war and conflict. Therefore, we described a small number of various lower extremity injuries seen by one orthopaedic surgeon during his volunteer medical mission to Jordan...
July 25, 2017: Surgical Technology International
Sławomir Jandziś, Stanisław Zaborniak
The article describes the work of Dr Aleksiewicz towards the development of orthopedics and rehabilitation in Lviv in the years 1912-1930 based on source materials belonging to his family and articles published in medical journals and daily press. In 1919, Dr Aleksiewicz established a Surgical and Orthopedic Department and a factory of prostheses at the Disabled House in Lviv. He also formed a 200-bed division for the visually impaired with basket- and comb-making workshops as well as massage and typing courses...
March 23, 2016: Ortopedia, Traumatologia, Rehabilitacja
Philippe Hernigou, Jacques Pariat
Though the date at which an orthopaedic implant was first used cannot be ascertained with any certainty, the fixation of bone fracture using an iron wire was reported for the first time in a French manuscript in 1775. The first techniques of operative fracture treatment were developed at the end of the 18th and in the beginning of the 19th centuries. The use of cerclage wires to fix fractures was the most frequent fixation at this time. The French Berenger-Feraud (1832-1900) had written the first book on internal fixation...
June 2017: International Orthopaedics
Jessica C Rivera, Renee M Greer, Mary Ann Spott, Anthony E Johnson
BACKGROUND: The Military Orthopaedic Trauma Registry (MOTR) was designed to replicate the Department of Defense Trauma Registry's (DoDTR's) role as pillar for data-driven management of extremity war wounds. The MOTR continuously undergoes quality assurance checks to optimize the registry data for future quality improvement efforts. We conducted a quality assurance survey of MOTR entrants to determine if a simple MOTR data pull could provide robust orthopedic-specific information toward the question of causes for late amputation...
November 2016: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
John Hedley-Whyte, Debra R Milamed
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Ulster Medical Journal
Michael J Beltran, Tyson E Becker, Richard K Hurley, Jennifer M Gurney, Roman A Hayda
Hemorrhage continues to be the most common cause of death among service members wounded in combat. Injuries that were previously nonsurvivable in previous wars are now routinely seen by combat surgeons in forward surgical units, the result of improvements in body armor, the universal use of field tourniquets to control extremity hemorrhage at the point of injury, and rapid air evacuation strategies. Combat orthopaedic surgeons remain a vital aspect of the forward surgical unit, tasked with assisting general surgical colleagues in the resuscitation of patients in hemorrhagic shock while also addressing traumatic amputations, open and closed long bone fractures, and mechanically unstable pelvic trauma...
October 2016: Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma
Col Jeffrey N Davila, Marc F Swiontkowski, Col Ret Romney C Andersen
The symposium Extremity War Injuries X: Return to Health and Function, presented by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the Orthopaedic Trauma Association, the Society of Military Orthopaedic Surgeons, and the Orthopaedic Research Society, was held in Washington, DC, on January 27 and 28, 2015. Course chairs Marc F. Swiontkowski, MD, and COL Jeffrey N. Davila, MD, presided over 2 days of general session lectures focusing on war/trauma-related musculoskeletal injuries resulting in service member disability, followed by small group discussions, with a goal of identifying knowledge gaps in the treatment of these injuries...
September 2016: Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Harold Ellis
All the readers of this journal will have read and heard about the ward and operating theatre sisters in 'the old days'. What were they really like, and what was it like to work with them in the hospitals of those far-off times? I entered the old Radcliffe Infirmary Oxford in the summer of 1945, just as World War II was drawing to a close, as a 19 year old student to start my clinical training. I then qualified in July 1948, the very month the NHS came into being, and started my surgical career as house surgeon...
April 2016: Journal of Perioperative Practice
Jessica C Rivera, Renee M Greer, Mary Ann Spott, Anthony E Johnson
BACKGROUND: The Military Orthopaedic Trauma Registry (MOTR) was designed to replicate the Department of Defense Trauma Registry's (DoDTR) role as pillar for data-driven management of extremity war wounds. MOTR continuously undergoes quality assurance checks to optimize the registry data for future quality improvement efforts. We conducted a quality assurance survey of MOTR entrants to determine if a simple MOTR data pull could provide robust orthopaedic specific information towards the question of causes for late amputation...
May 27, 2016: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
Philip J Belmont, Brett D Owens, Andrew J Schoenfeld
The combined wars in Afghanistan and Iraq represent the longest ongoing conflicts in American military history, with a combined casualty estimate of >59,000 service members. The nature of combat over the last decade has led to precipitous increases in severe orthopaedic injuries, including traumatic amputations and injuries to the spine. Nearly 75% of all injuries sustained in combat now are caused by explosive mechanisms, and fractures comprise 40% of all musculoskeletal injuries. Injuries to the axial skeleton are more frequent among personnel exposed to combat, and spinal trauma is identified in nearly 40% of those killed...
June 2016: Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Rasikh Maqsood, Alia Rasikh, Tariq Abbasi, Irfan Shukr
BACKGROUND: As a front line state in war against terror, Pakistan has been a victim of terrorism, for the last many years & Baluchistan has been the hub of all such terror activities. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence and type of injuries in mass casualties in terrorist activities in Baluchistan. METHODS: The study was done by the review of the record of all patients of terrorist attacks who were admitted in Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Quetta from 27th Aug 2012 to 31st Jul 2015...
October 2015: Journal of Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad: JAMC
Michael T Neary
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery: Official Publication of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons
Philippe Hernigou
In the last part of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth century surgeons at the University of Vienna helped transform the practice of surgery. They developed new more effective procedures, analyzed the results of their operations, promoted the emergence and growth of surgical specialties and sought understanding of tissue structure, physiology and pathophysiology. Their efforts made Vienna one of the world's most respected centres for operative treatment, basic and clinical research and surgical education...
May 2016: International Orthopaedics
Stéphane Bonnet, F Gonzalez, L Mathieu, G Boddaert, E Hornez, A Bertani, J-P Avaro, X Durand, F Rongieras, P Balandraud, S Rigal, F Pons
INTRODUCTION: The composition of a French Forward Surgical Team (FST) has remained constant since its creation in the early 1950s: 12 personnel, including a general and an orthopaedic surgeon. The training of military surgeons, however, has had to evolve to adapt to the growing complexities of modern warfare injuries in the context of increasing subspecialisation within surgery. The Advanced Course for Deployment Surgery (ACDS)-called Cours Avancé de Chirurgie en Mission Extérieure (CACHIRMEX)-has been designed to extend, reinforce and adapt the surgical skill set of the FST that will be deployed...
October 2016: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
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