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Critical care medicine, intensive care

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29349705/stool-cultures-at-the-icu-get-rid-of-it
#1
Carolin F Manthey, Darja Dranova, Martin Christner, Laura Berneking, Stefan Kluge, Ansgar W Lohse, Valentin Fuhrmann
BACKGROUND: Stool cultures for Campylobacter, Salmonella and Shigella and/or Yersinia spp. are frequently ordered in critically ill patients with diarrhea. The aim of this study is to analyze the diagnostic yield in a large cohort of critically ill patients. Therefore, we performed a cohort study at the Department of Intensive Care Medicine of a University Hospital (11 ICUs). RESULTS: From all patients who were admitted to the ICU between 2010 and 2015, stool cultures were taken from 2...
January 18, 2018: Annals of Intensive Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29343041/forgoing-life-sustaining-treatments-in-the-icu-to-withhold-or-to-withdraw-is-that-the-question
#2
Giuseppe R Gristina, Francesca Baroncelli, Marco Vergano
In the last decades, mortality from severe acute illnesses has considerably declined thanks to the advances in intensive care medicine. Meanwhile, critical care physicians realized that lifesustaining treatments (LST) may not be appropriate for every patient, and end-of-life care in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) started to receive growing attention. Most deaths occurring in the ICU now follow a decision to forgo life-sustaining treatments (DFLST), which can be implemented either by withdrawing (WDLST) or withholding (WHLST) life-sustaining treatments...
January 17, 2018: Minerva Anestesiologica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29330232/interventions-must-be-realistic-to-be-useful-and-completed-in-family-medicine
#3
EDITORIAL
Marjorie A Bowman, Dean A Seehusen, Anne Victoria Neale
Being realistic while helping our patients is this issue's theme. Given the volume of tasks required in family medicine, recommendations for improvements in direct care or care measurement cannot just be evidence-based but must also be realistic. On the list of realistic: ordering antipsychotics for symptoms of dementia in the elderly, despite recommendations to not do so; ordering antidepressants without fear that the patient could develop hypertension; mental health care providers in primary care offices; forced choice for opioid management; plus agenda setting for visit efficiency...
January 2018: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine: JABFM
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29329118/ce-managing-sepsis-and-septic-shock-current-guidelines-and-definitions
#4
Mary Beth Flynn Makic, Elizabeth Bridges
Recent updates emphasize early recognition and prompt intervention. ABSTRACT: Sepsis is a leading cause of critical illness and hospital mortality. Early recognition and intervention are essential for the survival of patients with this syndrome. In 2002, the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) launched the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) to reduce overall patient morbidity and mortality from sepsis and septic shock by driving practice initiatives based on current best evidence...
January 11, 2018: American Journal of Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29325842/use-of-dexmedetomidine-in-cardiothoracic-and-vascular-anesthesia
#5
REVIEW
Lucía Gallego-Ligorit, Marc Vives, Jorge Vallés-Torres, T Alberto Sanjuán-Villarreal, Azucena Pajares, Mario Iglesias
Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective α2-adrenergic agonist with analgesic and sedative properties. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of the drug for short-lasting sedation (24 h) in intensive care units (ICUs) in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation and endotracheal intubation. In October 2008, the Food and Drug Administration extended use of the drug for the sedation of nonintubated patients before and during surgical and nonsurgical procedures. In the European Union, the European Medicine Agency approved the use of dexmedetomidine in September 2011 with a single recognized indication: ICU adult patients requiring mild sedation and awakening in response to verbal stimulus...
December 2, 2017: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29319647/transition-to-critical-care-practice-within-an-academic-service-partnership-a-case-report-of-the-first-3-years-of-clinical-immersion-in-trauma-burn-and-neuroscience-critical-care
#6
Esther Bay, Andrea Sherzer, Emily Darnbrook
In response to regulators of nursing education and the Institute of Medicine, an academic-service partnership was formed between a research-intensive school of nursing and a tertiary health care facility. In that partnership, clinical experiences occurred mostly within 1 organization. This case report showcases the development, implementation, and revisions within our capstone immersion course, designed to ease the new graduates' transition into practice, including transitions to critical care nursing. Herein, we highlight our successes and challenges of implementing the clinical component within 2 critical care units focused on trauma and neurosurgical care of complex patients...
January 2018: Journal of Trauma Nursing: the Official Journal of the Society of Trauma Nurses
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29318326/-reimbursement-of-intensive-care-services-in-austria-use-of-the-lkf-system
#7
REVIEW
M Joannidis, S J Klein, P Metnitz, A Valentin
In Austria, the reimbursement of intensive care services is based on a Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRG) system which has been adapted to the Austrian framework conditions. Compared to Germany where economic considerations had led to personnel cuts, mandatory targets outlined in both the LKF ("Leistungsorientierte Krankenanstaltenfinanzierung", Performance-oriented Hospital Financing) and ÖSG ("Österreichischer Strukturplan Gesundheit", Austrian Health Care Structure Plan) plans ensure a high level of medical and intensive care...
January 9, 2018: Medizinische Klinik, Intensivmedizin und Notfallmedizin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29310974/sepsis-in-tropical-regions-report-from-the-task-force-on-tropical-diseases-by-the-world-federation-of-societies-of-intensive-and-critical-care-medicine
#8
Steven McGloughlin, Guy A Richards, Mohd Basri Mat Nor, Shirish Prayag, Tim Baker, Pravin Amin
Sepsis and septic shock in the tropics are caused by a wide array of organisms. These infections are encountered mainly in low and middle-income countries (LMIC) where a lack of infrastructure and medical facilities contribute to the high morbidity and mortality. Published sepsis guidelines are based on studies primarily performed in high income countries and as such recommendations may or may not be relevant to practice in the tropics. Failure to adhere to guidelines, particularly among non-intensive care specialists even in high-income countries, is an area of concern for sepsis management...
December 30, 2017: Journal of Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29307965/evaluation-of-quality-indicators-in-an-indian-intensive-care-unit-using-chitra-database
#9
Kiran Kumar Gudivada, Bhuvana Krishna, Sampath Sriram
Background: Quality indicators (QIs) are essential for maintaining quality of care in the critically ill. The Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine proposed benchmarks and enabled Indian Intensive Care Units (ICUs) to capture data in an electronic database: Customized Health in Intensive Care Trainable Research and Analysis (CHITRA) tool. The purpose of this study is to report QIs in an Indian ICU using this database. Materials and Methods: Data from patients admitted to ICU between October 2015 and January 2017 were entered into CHITRA...
December 2017: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29307960/tropical-fevers-in-indian-intensive-care-units-a-prospective-multicenter-study
#10
Sunit Singhi, Narendra Rungta, Karthi Nallasamy, Ashish Bhalla, J V Peter, Dhruva Chaudhary, Rajesh Mishra, Prakash Shastri, Rajesh Bhagchandani, T D Chugh
Background and Aims: Infections in tropics often present as undifferentiated fevers with organ failures. We conducted this nationwide study to identify the prevalence, profile, resource utilization, and outcome of tropical fevers in Indian Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Materials and Methods: This was a multicenter prospective observational study done in 34 ICUs across India (July 2013-September 2014). Critically ill adults and children with nonlocalizing fever >48 h and onset < 14 days with any of the following: thrombocytopenia/rash, respiratory distress, renal failure, encephalopathy, jaundice, or multiorgan failure were enrolled consecutively...
December 2017: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29304857/a-qualitative-exploration-of-the-discharge-process-and-factors-predisposing-to-readmissions-to-the-intensive-care-unit
#11
Uchenna R Ofoma, Yue Dong, Ognjen Gajic, Brian W Pickering
BACKGROUND: Quantitative studies have demonstrated several factors predictive of readmissions to intensive care. Clinical decision tools, derived from these factors have failed to reduce readmission rates. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively explore the experiences and perceptions of physicians and nurses to gain more insight into intensive care readmissions. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews of intensive care unit (ICU) and general medicine care providers explored work routines, understanding and perceptions of the discharge process, and readmissions to intensive care...
January 5, 2018: BMC Health Services Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29303208/journal-club-sessions-in-the-intensive-care-unit-a-conceptual-framework
#12
Bjoern Zante, Patricia Stoecklin, Joerg Christian Schefold
Journal Club sessions are regarded highly effective tools for continued medical education. They aim to keep participants up to date with the current available literature and may enhance one's critical reading, interpretation, and discussion skills. Thus, Journal Clubs should be implemented as part of educational curricula in intensive care medicine. Here, we provide a conceptual framework that may support medical educators and programme directors to successfully implement structured Journal Club sessions. Moreover, we discuss the technical aspects and future perspectives of respective educational formats...
January 5, 2018: Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29302597/ethical-challenges-involved-in-obtaining-consent-for-research-from-patients-hospitalized-in-the-intensive-care-unit
#13
Fiona Ecarnot, Jean-Pierre Quenot, Guillaume Besch, Gaël Piton
Clinical research remains a vital contributor to medical knowledge, and is an established and integral part of the practice of medicine worldwide. Respect for patient autonomy and ethical principles dictate that informed consent must be obtained from subjects before they can be enrolled into clinical research, yet these conditions may be difficult to apply in real practice in the intensive care unit (ICU). A number of factors serve to complexify the consent process in critically ill patients, notably decisional incapacity of the patient due to illness or sedation...
December 2017: Annals of Translational Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29297399/the-coming-era-of-precision-medicine-for-intensive-care
#14
REVIEW
Jean-Louis Vincent
Recent advances in technology and better understanding of mechanisms underlying disease are beginning to enable us to better characterize critically ill patients. Instead of using nonspecific syndromic groupings, such as sepsis or acute respiratory distress syndrome, we can now classify individual patients according to various specific characteristics, such as immune status. This "personalized" medicine approach will enable us to distinguish patients who have similar clinical presentations but different cellular and molecular responses that will influence their need for and responses (both negative and positive) to specific treatments...
December 28, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29297397/time-sensitive-therapeutics
#15
REVIEW
John J Marini
Much of what we now do in Critical Care carries an air of urgency, a pressing need to discover and act, with priorities biased toward a reactive response. However, efficacy often depends not simply upon what we do, but rather on whether, when, and how persistently we intervene. The practice of medicine is based upon diagnosis, integration of multiple sources of information, keen judgment, and appropriate intervention. Timing may not be everything, as the well-known adage suggests, but in the intensive care unit (ICU) timing issues clearly deserve more attention than they are currently given...
December 28, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29297387/personalised-fluid-resuscitation-in-the-icu-still-a-fluid-concept
#16
REVIEW
Frank van Haren
The administration of intravenous fluid to critically ill patients is one of the most common, but also one of the most fiercely debated, interventions in intensive care medicine. Even though many thousands of patients have been enrolled in large trials of alternative fluid strategies, consensus remains elusive and practice is widely variable. Critically ill patients are significantly heterogeneous, making a one size fits all approach unlikely to be successful.New data from basic, animal, and clinical research suggest that fluid resuscitation could be associated with significant harm...
December 28, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29288367/antimicrobial-resistance-and-antibiotic-stewardship-programs-in-the-icu-insistence-and-persistence-in-the-fight-against-resistance-a-position-statement-from-esicm-escmid-waaar-round-table-on-multi-drug-resistance
#17
Jan J De Waele, Murat Akova, Massimo Antonelli, Rafael Canton, Jean Carlet, Daniel De Backer, George Dimopoulos, José Garnacho-Montero, Jozef Kesecioglu, Jeffrey Lipman, Mervyn Mer, José-Artur Paiva, Mario Poljak, Jason A Roberts, Jesus Rodriguez Bano, Jean-François Timsit, Jean-Ralph Zahar, Matteo Bassetti
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a clear and present danger to patients in any intensive care unit (ICU) around the world. Whereas AMR may affect any patient in the hospital, patients in the ICU are particularly at risk of acquiring AMR infections due to the intensity of the treatment, use of invasive devices, increased risk of transmission and exposure to antibiotics. AMR is present in every ICU, although prevalence is geographically different and AMR pathogens encountered are variable. Intensive care and infectious disease specialists from the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, European Society of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases and World Alliance Against Antimicrobial Resistance, united in the ANTARCTICA (Antimicrobial Resistance in Critical Care) coalition, call for increased awareness and action among health care professionals to reduce AMR development in critically ill patients, to improve treatment of AMR infections and to coordinate scientific research in this high-risk patient population...
December 29, 2017: Intensive Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29284322/maximizing-nutrition-support-practice-and-measuring-adherence-to-nutrition-support-guidelines-in-a-canadian-tertiary-care-icu
#18
Michele E McCall, Alice Adamo, Katherine Latko, Ashley K Rieder, Nicole Durand, Tova Nathanson
OBJECTIVE: New comprehensive guidelines for nutrition support (NS) in the intensive care unit (ICU) can be used to improve quality of care and benchmark current practice. The objective of this study was to (a) compare NS practices in our medical/surgical ICU (MSICU) to 18 recommendations described in the Canadian Clinical Practice Guidelines and Society of Critical Care Medicine/American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition guidelines, (b) determine the percentage of goal calories and protein delivered, and (c) identify the barriers to successful NS delivery...
January 1, 2017: Journal of Intensive Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29262441/imaging-in-neurocritical-care-practice
#19
Craig Williamson, Larry Morgan, Joshua P Klein
The use of neuroimaging in conjunction with serial neurological examinations is a core component of modern neurocritical care practice. Although there is a growing role for other neuromonitoring techniques, the ability to quickly and accurately interpret images in the context of a patient's clinical status arguably remains the indispensable skill for neurocritical care practitioners. Due to its rapid acquisition time and excellent ability to detect intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), cerebral edema, and signs of elevated intracranial pressure, computed tomography (CT) remains the most useful neuroimaging technique for intensive care unit (ICU) patients...
December 2017: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29261818/update-in-hospital-palliative-care-symptom-management-communication-caregiver-outcomes-and-moral-distress
#20
Rachel D Havyer, Daniel H Pomerantz, Robert L Jayes, Patricia F Harris, Stephanie M Harman, Aziz A Ansari
BACKGROUND: Updated knowledge of the palliative care (PC) literature is needed to maintain competency and best address the PC needs of hospitalized patients. We critiqued the recent PC literature with the highest potential to impact hospital practice. METHODS: We reviewed articles published between January 2016 and December 2016, which were identified through a handsearch of leading journals and a MEDLINE search. The final 9 articles selected were determined by consensus based on scientific rigor, relevance to hospital medicine, and impact on practice...
December 20, 2017: Journal of Hospital Medicine: An Official Publication of the Society of Hospital Medicine
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