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overdose Emergency Department

Daniel Kolinsky, Samuel M Keim, Brian G Cohn, Evan S Schwarz, Donald M Yealy
BACKGROUND: The current standards for domestic emergency medical services suggest that all patients suspected of opioid overdose be transported to the emergency department for evaluation and treatment. This includes patients who improve after naloxone administration in the field because of concerns for rebound toxicity. However, various emergency medical services systems release such patients at the scene after a 15- to 20-min observation period as long as they return to their baseline...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Christopher Rowe, Eric Vittinghoff, Glenn-Milo Santos, Emily Behar, Caitlin Turner, Phillip Coffin
OBJECTIVES: Opioid overdose mortality has tripled in the USA since 2000 and opioids are responsible for more than half of all drug overdose deaths, which reached an all-time high in 2014. Opioid overdoses resulting in death, however, represent only a small fraction of all opioid overdose events and efforts to improve surveillance of this public health problem should include tracking nonfatal overdose events. International Classification of Disease (ICD) diagnosis codes, increasingly used for the surveillance of nonfatal drug overdose events, have not been rigorously assessed for validity in capturing overdose events...
October 20, 2016: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Mari-Lynn Drainoni, Elisa A Koppelman, James A Feldman, Alexander Y Walley, Patricia M Mitchell, Jacqueline Ellison, Edward Bernstein
BACKGROUND: The increase in opioid overdose deaths has become a national public health crisis. Naloxone is an important tool in opioid overdose prevention. Distribution of nasal naloxone has been found to be a feasible, and effective intervention in community settings and may have potential high applicability in the emergency department, which is often the initial point of care for persons at high risk of overdose. One safety net hospital introduced an innovative policy to offer take-home nasal naloxone via a standing order to ensure distribution to patients at risk for overdose...
October 18, 2016: BMC Research Notes
Victoria J Ganem, Alejandra G Mora, Nina Nnamani, Vikhyat S Bebarta
BACKGROUND: Drug overdose has become a leading cause of death in the United States and is a growing issue in civilian and military populations. Increasing prescription drug misuse and poisonings translate into greater utilization of medical resources. Our objective was to describe the incidences of overdoses and their associated events and outcomes following emergency department consult. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study on cases evaluated in 2 military hospital emergency departments over 3 years...
October 2016: Military Medicine
Dhara Shah, Shannon Manzi
OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess the frequency, type, and potential severity of errors intercepted by pharmacists on review of discharge prescriptions in a pediatric emergency department (ED). METHODS: This was a retrospective, observational study conducted in the ED of a pediatric teaching hospital. A daily report of prescriptions from the previous day was reviewed by a pharmacist for safety and efficacy. If an intervention was deemed necessary, the prescriber was contacted for clarification...
October 4, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Frank G A Jansman, Heleen A Crommelin, Freek J A H van Hout, Jan Meulenbelt
CONTEXT: Clozapine is used for decennia for the treatment of schizophrenia. Agranulocytosis, diabetic ketoacidosis, gastrointestinal hypomotility, and myocarditis are well-known adverse effects of clozapine, which are sometimes life threatening. Here we report a case of rhabdomyolysis upon an acute overdose of clozapine. CASE: A male patient, 36 years, with elevated creatinine kinase levels (9899 U/l), developed rhabdomyolysis afterafter admission to the emergency department...
December 2015: Drug Saf Case Rep
Andrew Kestler, Jane Buxton, Gray Meckling, Amanda Giesler, Michelle Lee, Kirsten Fuller, Hong Quian, Dalya Marks, Frank Scheuermeyer
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Although the World Health Organization recommends take-home naloxone to address the increasing global burden of opioid-related deaths, few emergency departments (EDs) offer a take-home naloxone program. We seek to determine the take-home naloxone acceptance rate among ED patients at high risk of opioid overdose and to examine factors associated with acceptance. METHODS: At a single urban ED, consecutive eligible patients at risk of opioid overdose were invited to complete a survey about opioid use, overdose experience, and take-home naloxone awareness, and then offered take-home naloxone...
October 10, 2016: Annals of Emergency Medicine
Tyra Dark, Heather A Flynn, George Rust, Heidi Kinsell, Jeffrey S Harman
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to describe the epidemiology of anxiety-related emergency department (ED) visits in the United States and assess the care provided during those visits. METHODS: Data from the 2009-2011 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey were used to identify all ED visits in which the patient received a primary anxiety diagnosis or declared anxiety as the reason for the visit (N=1,029). Patient characteristics, treatment provided, and dispositions of these nationally representative visits were assessed...
October 17, 2016: Psychiatric Services: a Journal of the American Psychiatric Association
Rahul Bhat, Maryann Mazer-Amirshahi, Christie Sun, Janelle Vaughns, Maria Dynin, Eshetu Tefera, Daryn Towle, Munish Goyal
OBJECTIVE: There are limited data regarding appropriateness of sedative and paralytic dosing of obese patients undergoing rapid sequence intubation (RSI) in the emergency department. The goal of this study was to compare rates of appropriate succinylcholine and etomidate doses in obese and nonobese patients. METHODS: Retrospective review using a database of endotracheally intubated patients using RSI in an urban, tertiary care academic emergency department, from November 2009 to June 2011...
September 28, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Maura Sammon, Alveena Dawood, Scott Beaudoin, Richard A Harrigan
BACKGROUND: One of the principal tasks of an emergency physician is identifying potentially life-threatening conditions in the undifferentiated patient; cardiac dysrhythmia is an example of such a condition. A systematic approach to a patient with atypical dysrhythmia enables proper identification of such-life threatening conditions. CASE REPORT: We describe a 31-year-old man presenting to the emergency department with an undifferentiated dysrhythmia after naloxone reversal of an opiate overdose...
October 7, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Kalkan Asim, Yeniocak Selman, Yazici Suleyman, Karcioglu Ozgur, Bilir Ozlem, Ersunan Gokhan
INTRODUCTION: Lithium overdose can be associated with cardiac toxicity, especially in those with underlying heart disease. Toxic levels of serum lithium are associated with cardiotoxic effects ranging from simple ECG disorders to dysrhythmias, cardiomyopathy and even acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This report describes a patient with AMI accompanied by high blood levels of lithium. CASE PRESENTATION: A 62-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department due to weakness and acute chest pain...
July 2016: Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal
Dan Todkill, Helen E Hughes, Alex J Elliot, Roger A Morbey, Obaghe Edeghere, Sally Harcourt, Tom Hughes, Tina Endericks, Brian McCloskey, Mike Catchpole, Sue Ibbotson, Gillian Smith
: Introduction In preparation for the London 2012 Olympic Games, existing syndromic surveillance systems operating in England were expanded to include daily general practitioner (GP) out-of-hours (OOH) contacts and emergency department (ED) attendances at sentinel sites (the GP OOH and ED syndromic surveillance systems: GPOOHS and EDSSS). Hypothesis/Problem The further development of syndromic surveillance systems in time for the London 2012 Olympic Games provided a unique opportunity to investigate the impact of a large mass-gathering event on public health and health services as monitored in near real-time by syndromic surveillance of GP OOH contacts and ED attendances...
September 19, 2016: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine
Darin Neven, Leonard Paulozzi, Donelle Howell, Sterling McPherson, Sean M Murphy, Becky Grohs, Linda Marsh, Crystal Lederhos, John Roll
BACKGROUND: Increasing prescription overdose deaths have demonstrated the need for safer emergency department (ED) prescribing practices for patients who are frequent ED users. OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that the care of frequent ED users would improve using a citywide care coordination program combined with an ED care coordination information system, as measured by fewer ED visits by and decreased controlled substance prescribing to these patients. METHODS: We conducted a multisite randomized controlled trial (RCT) across all EDs in a metropolitan area; 165 patients with the most ED visits for complaints of pain were randomized...
September 10, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Jing Feng, Joseph P Iser, Wei Yang
BACKGROUND: Despite today's heightened concern over opioid overdose, the lack of population-based data examining clinical and contextual factors associated with opioid use represents a knowledge gap with relevance to prevention and treatment interventions. We sought to quantify rates of emergency department (ED) visits and inpatient hospitalizations for harmful opioid effects and their sociodemographic differentials as well as clinical correlates in Southern Nevada, using ED visit and hospital inpatient discharge records from 2011 to 2013...
2016: BMC Health Services Research
Karen H Antman, Harris A Berman, Terence R Flotte, Jeffrey Flier, Dennis M Dimitri, Monica Bharel
Drug overdose has become the leading cause of injury death in the United States. More than half of those deaths involve prescription drugs, specifically opioids. A key component of addressing this national epidemic is improving prescriber practices.A review of the curricula at the four medical schools in Massachusetts revealed that, although they taught components of addiction medicine, no uniform standard existed to ensure that all students were taught prevention and management strategies for prescription drug misuse...
August 16, 2016: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Patil Armenian, Alexander Olson, Andres Anaya, Alicia Kurtz, Rawnica Ruegner, Roy R Gerona
In 2013 and 2014, more than 700 deaths were attributed to fentanyl and fentanyl analogues in the United States. Of recent concern is the cluster of unintentional fentanyl overdoses because of tablets thought to be "Norco" purchased on the street in Northern California. U-47700 (trans-3,4-dichloro-N-[2-(dimethyl-amino)cyclohexyl]-N-methylbenz-amide) is a nonfentanyl-based synthetic opioid with 7.5 times the binding affinity of morphine to μ-opioid. We report a case of fentanyl and U-47700 intoxication from what was thought to be illicitly purchased Norco...
July 20, 2016: Annals of Emergency Medicine
Hoi Yan Tong, Nicolás Medrano, Alberto Manuel Borobia, José Antonio Ruiz, Ana María Martínez, Julia Martín, Manuel Quintana, Santos García, Antonio José Carcas, Elena Ramírez
BACKGROUND: There are few data on hepatotoxicity induced by acute or chronic paracetamol poisoning in the pediatric population. Paracetamol poisoning data can reveal the weaknesses of paracetamol poisoning management guidelines. METHODS: We retrospectively studied the patients of less than 18 years old with measurable paracetamol levels, who were brought to the emergency department (ED) of La Paz University Hospital, Madrid, Spain, for suspected paracetamol overdoses between 2005 and 2010...
July 23, 2016: World Journal of Pediatrics: WJP
Alexis L Cates, Scott M Wheatley, Kenneth D Katz
A 22-month-old girl without any significant medical history accidentally consumed a small amount of a therapeutic compounding cream that contained camphor, gabapentin, clonidine, ketoprofen, and lidocaine. Upon presentation to the emergency department, the child exhibited immediate onset of altered mental status with wide fluctuation in her vital signs, which included intermittent apnea requiring bag-valve mask assistance and endotracheal intubation. Serum laboratory analysis measured a clonidine level of 2...
July 23, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Moses Kirubairaj Amos Jegaraj, Shubhanker Mitra, Sathish Kumar, Bagyalakshmi Selva, Manimaran Pushparaj, Bijesh Yadav, Abhilash Kundavaram Paul Prabhakar, Alex Reginald
BACKGROUND: Deliberate self-harm (DSH) is a major under-recognized epidemic in the low- and middle-income countries. This is a large retrospective study form the Emergency Department (ED) of Tertiary Care Center of South India to describe the clinicodemographic features of DSH cases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective study conducted at ED of Christian Medical College, Vellore, India from January 01, 2011 to December 31, 2013. All cases of DSH were included in the study...
January 2016: Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care
Youn-Jung Kim, Chang Hwan Sohn, Seung Mok Ryoo, Shin Ahn, Dong Woo Seo, Yoon-Seon Lee, Jae Ho Lee, Bum Jin Oh, Kyoung Soo Lim, Won Young Kim
CONTEXT: Acquired methemoglobinemia is a potentially fatal condition that leads to tissue hypoxia. Although the clinical features of methemoglobinemia depend on the methemoglobin levels, the clinical course would differ depending on the causative agents. OBJECTIVE: We attempted to clarify this issue by comparing the clinical course of methemoglobinemia caused by dapsone and that caused by other toxic agents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective case-control study was performed...
August 2016: Clinical Toxicology
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