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Genome Editing human

Jiangming Sun, Yang De Marinis, Peter Osmark, Pratibha Singh, Annika Bagge, Bérengère Valtat, Petter Vikman, Peter Spégel, Hindrik Mulder
RNA editing is a post-transcriptional alteration of RNA sequences that, via insertions, deletions or base substitutions, can affect protein structure as well as RNA and protein expression. Recently, it has been suggested that RNA editing may be more frequent than previously thought. A great impediment, however, to a deeper understanding of this process is the paramount sequencing effort that needs to be undertaken to identify RNA editing events. Here, we describe an in silico approach, based on machine learning, that ameliorates this problem...
2016: PloS One
Colin Crist
Skeletal muscle is the most abundant tissue in our body, is responsible for generating the force required for movement and is also an important thermogenic organ. Skeletal muscle is an enigmatic tissue because, while on one hand, skeletal muscle regeneration after injury is arguably one of the best studied stem cell dependent regenerative processes, on the other hand, skeletal muscle is still subject to many degenerative disorders with few therapeutic options in the clinic. It is important to develop new regenerative medicine based therapies for skeletal muscle...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Pathology
J Wu, A Platero Luengo, M A Gil, K Suzuki, C Cuello, M Morales Valencia, I Parrilla, C A Martinez, A Nohalez, J Roca, E A Martinez, J C Izpisua Belmonte
More than eighteen years have passed since the first derivation of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), but their clinical use is still met with several challenges, such as ethical concerns regarding the need of human embryos, tissue rejection after transplantation and tumour formation. The generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) enables the access to patient-derived pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) and opens the door for personalized medicine as tissues/organs can potentially be generated from the same genetic background as the patient recipients, thus avoiding immune rejections or complication of immunosuppression strategies...
October 2016: Reproduction in Domestic Animals, Zuchthygiene
Hyejung Won, Luis de la Torre-Ubieta, Jason L Stein, Neelroop N Parikshak, Jerry Huang, Carli K Opland, Michael J Gandal, Gavin J Sutton, Farhad Hormozdiari, Daning Lu, Changhoon Lee, Eleazar Eskin, Irina Voineagu, Jason Ernst, Daniel H Geschwind
Three-dimensional physical interactions within chromosomes dynamically regulate gene expression in a tissue-specific manner. However, the 3D organization of chromosomes during human brain development and its role in regulating gene networks dysregulated in neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism or schizophrenia, are unknown. Here we generate high-resolution 3D maps of chromatin contacts during human corticogenesis, permitting large-scale annotation of previously uncharacterized regulatory relationships relevant to the evolution of human cognition and disease...
October 19, 2016: Nature
Chen Ling, Kanit Bhukhai, Zifei Yin, Mengqun Tan, Mervin C Yoder, Philippe Leboulch, Emmanuel Payen, Arun Srivastava
We have reported that of the 10 commonly used AAV serotype vectors, AAV6 is the most efficient in transducing primary human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). However, the transduction efficiency of the wild-type (WT) AAV6 vector varies greatly in HSPCs from different donors. Here we report two distinct strategies to further increase the transduction efficiency in HSPCs from donors that are transduced less efficiently with the WT AAV6 vectors. The first strategy involved modifications of the viral capsid proteins where specific surface-exposed tyrosine (Y) and threonine (T) residues were mutagenized to generate a triple-mutant (Y705 + Y731F + T492V) AAV6 vector...
October 19, 2016: Scientific Reports
Tetsuya Ishii
Genome editing based on site-directed nucleases facilitated efficient and versatile genetic modifications in human cells. However, recent reports, demonstrating CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing in human embryos have raised profound concerns worldwide. This commentary explores the clinical justification and feasibility of reproductive medicine using germline genome editing. Despite the perceived utility of reproductive medicine for treating intractable infertility, it is difficult to justify germline genome editing from the perspective of the prospective child...
October 5, 2016: Reproductive Biomedicine Online
Bart Ellenbroek, Jiun Youn
Rodents (especially Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus) have been the most widely used models in biomedical research for many years. A notable shift has taken place over the last two decades, with mice taking a more and more prominent role in biomedical science compared to rats. This shift was primarily instigated by the availability of a much larger genetic toolbox for mice, particularly embryonic-stem-cell-based targeting technology for gene disruption. With the recent emergence of tools for altering the rat genome, notably genome-editing technologies, the technological gap between the two organisms is closing, and it is becoming more important to consider the physiological, anatomical, biochemical and pharmacological differences between rats and mice when choosing the right model system for a specific biological question...
October 1, 2016: Disease Models & Mechanisms
Xiaotang Hu
Since 2012, the CRISPR-Cas9 system has been quickly and successfully tested in a broad range of organisms and cells including hematopoietic cells. The application of CRISPR-Cas9 in human hematopoietic cells mainly involves the genes responsible for HIV infection, β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease (SCD). The successful disruption of CCR5 and CXCR4 genes in T cells by CRISPR-Cas9 promotes the prospect of the technology in the functional cure of HIV. More recently, eliminating CCR5 and CXCR4 in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from patients and targeting the HIV genome have been successfully carried out in several laboratories...
October 2, 2016: Blood Cells, Molecules & Diseases
Mark A DeWitt, Wendy Magis, Nicolas L Bray, Tianjiao Wang, Jennifer R Berman, Fabrizia Urbinati, Seok-Jin Heo, Therese Mitros, Denise P Muñoz, Dario Boffelli, Donald B Kohn, Mark C Walters, Dana Carroll, David I K Martin, Jacob E Corn
Genetic diseases of blood cells are prime candidates for treatment through ex vivo gene editing of CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), and a variety of technologies have been proposed to treat these disorders. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a recessive genetic disorder caused by a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the β-globin gene (HBB). Sickle hemoglobin damages erythrocytes, causing vasoocclusion, severe pain, progressive organ damage, and premature death. We optimize design and delivery parameters of a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex comprising Cas9 protein and unmodified single guide RNA, together with a single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide donor (ssODN), to enable efficient replacement of the SCD mutation in human HSPCs...
October 12, 2016: Science Translational Medicine
Chance M Nowak, Seth Lawson, Megan Zerez, Leonidas Bleris
The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats system allows a single guide RNA (sgRNA) to direct a protein with combined helicase and nuclease activity to the DNA. Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9), a CRISPR-associated protein, has revolutionized our ability to probe and edit the human genome in vitro and in vivo Arguably, the true modularity of the Cas9 platform is conferred through the ease of sgRNA programmability as well as the degree of modifications the sgRNA can tolerate without compromising its association with SpCas9 and function...
October 12, 2016: Nucleic Acids Research
Xie Dejian, Shi Minglei, Zhang Yan, Wang Tianyi, Shen Wenlong, Ye Bingyu, Li Ping, He Chao, Zhang Xiangyuan, Zhao Zhihu
The CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is the main insulator protein described in vertebrates. It plays fundamental roles during diverse cellular processes. CTCF gene knockout mice led to death during embryonic development. To further explore the functions of CTCF, we employed a CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering strategy to in-frame insert the mitosis-special degradation domain (MD) of cyclin B into the upstream open reading frame of CTCF gene. Fusion protein is designed to degrade during mitosis leaded by MD. As a control group, mutation of a single arginine (R42A) within the destruction box inactivates the MD leading to constitutive expression of MD(*)-CTCF...
July 20, 2016: Yi Chuan, Hereditas
Grace Woodruff, Sol M Reyna, Mariah Dunlap, Rik Van Der Kant, Julia A Callender, Jessica E Young, Elizabeth A Roberts, Lawrence S B Goldstein
We investigated early phenotypes caused by familial Alzheimer's disease (fAD) mutations in isogenic human iPSC-derived neurons. Analysis of neurons carrying fAD PS1 or APP mutations introduced using genome editing technology at the endogenous loci revealed that fAD mutant neurons had previously unreported defects in the recycling state of endocytosis and soma-to-axon transcytosis of APP and lipoproteins. The endocytosis reduction could be rescued through treatment with a β-secretase inhibitor. Our data suggest that accumulation of β-CTFs of APP, but not Aβ, slow vesicle formation from an endocytic recycling compartment marked by the transcytotic GTPase Rab11...
October 11, 2016: Cell Reports
Yang Yang, Jian-Ge Qiu, Yong Li, Jin-Ming Di, Wen-Ji Zhang, Qi-Wei Jiang, Di-Wei Zheng, Yao Chen, Meng-Ning Wei, Jia-Rong Huang, Kun Wang, Zhi Shi
The RNA-guided clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic (CRISPR) in combination with a CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9) nuclease system is a new rapid and precise technology for genome editing. In the present study, we applied the CRISPR/Cas9 system to target ABCB1 (also named MDR1) gene which encodes a 170 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein/P-gp) transporting multiple types of chemotherapeutic drugs including taxanes, epipodophyllotoxins, vinca alkaloids and anthracyclines out of cells to contribute multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells...
2016: American Journal of Translational Research
Muhammad Abu Bakr Shabbir, Haihong Hao, Muhammad Zubair Shabbir, Hafiz Iftikhar Hussain, Zahid Iqbal, Saeed Ahmed, Adeel Sattar, Mujahid Iqbal, Jun Li, Zonghui Yuan
Prokaryotes have developed numerous innate immune mechanisms in order to fend off bacteriophage or plasmid attack. One of these immune systems is clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). CRISPR-associated proteins play a key role in survival of prokaryotes against invaders, as these systems cleave DNA of foreign genetic elements. Beyond providing immunity, these systems have significant impact in altering the bacterial physiology in term of its virulence and pathogenicity, as well as evolution...
2016: Frontiers in Immunology
Charles H Williams, Charles C Hong
Target based chemical screens are a mainstay of modern drug discovery, but the effectiveness of this reductionist approach is being questioned in light of declines in pharmaceutical R & D efficiency. In recent years, phenotypic screens have gained increasing acceptance as a complementary/alternative approach to early drug discovery. We discuss the various model organisms used in phenotypic screens, with particular focus on zebrafish, which has emerged as a leading model of in vivo phenotypic screens. Additionally, we anticipate therapeutic opportunities, particularly in orphan disease space, in the context of rapid advances in human Mendelian genetics, electronic health record (EHR)-enabled genome-phenome associations, and genome editing...
2016: Computational and Structural Biotechnology Journal
Andrew J Hogan
The Asilomar conference on genetic engineering in 1975 has long been pointed to by scientists as a model for internal regulation and public engagement. In 2015, the organizers of the International Summit on Human Gene Editing in Washington, DC looked to Asilomar as they sought to address the implications of the new CRISPR gene editing technique. Like at Asilomar, the conveners chose to limit the discussion to a narrow set of potential CRISPR applications, involving inheritable human genome editing. The adoption by scientists in 2015 of an Asilomar-like script for discussing genetic engineering offers historians the opportunity to analyze the adjustments that have been made since 1975, and to identify the blind spots that remain in public engagement...
October 5, 2016: Endeavour
Fangkun Liu, Jing Huang, Bo Ning, Zhixiong Liu, Shen Chen, Wei Zhao
Patient-derived cell lines and animal models have proven invaluable for the understanding of human intestinal diseases and for drug development although both inherently comprise disadvantages and caveats. Many genetically determined intestinal diseases occur in specific tissue microenvironments that are not adequately modeled by monolayer cell culture. Likewise, animal models incompletely recapitulate the complex pathologies of intestinal diseases of humans and fall short in predicting the effects of candidate drugs...
2016: Frontiers in Pharmacology
Chaolong Lin, Huanhuan Li, Mengru Hao, Dan Xiong, Yong Luo, Chenghao Huang, Quan Yuan, Jun Zhang, Ningshao Xia
Genetically modified HSV-1 viruses serve as promising vectors for tumour therapy and vaccine development. The CRISPR/Cas9 system is one of the most powerful tools for precise gene editing of the genomes of organisms. However, whether the CRISPR/Cas9 system can precisely and efficiently make gene replacements in the genome of HSV-1 remains essentially unknown. Here, we reported CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of the HSV-1 genome in human cells, including the knockout and replacement of large genes. In established cells stably expressing CRISPR/Cas9, gRNA in coordination with Cas9 could direct a precise cleavage within a pre-defined target region, and foreign genes were successfully used to replace the target gene seamlessly by HDR-mediated gene replacement...
October 7, 2016: Scientific Reports
Zhenyu He, Kehkooi Kee
Gene targeting and editing is an essential tool for both basic research and clinical application such as gene therapy. Several endonucleases have been invented to fulfill these purposes, including zinc finger nucleases, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9. Although all of these systems can target DNA sequence with high efficiency, they also exert off-target effects and genotoxicity. The off-target effects might not hinder their usage in animal models because the correctly targeted cells can be selected for further studies...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
Chew-Li Soh, Danwei Huangfu
The recent advent of engineered nucleases including the CRISPR/Cas9 system has greatly facilitated genome manipulation in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). In addition to facilitating hPSC-based disease studies, the application of genome engineering in hPSCs has also opened up new avenues for cell replacement therapy. To improve consistency and reproducibility of hPSC-based studies, and to meet the safety and regulatory requirements for clinical translation, it is necessary to use a defined, xeno-free cell culture system...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
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