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Genome Editing human

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28822858/comparison-of-genome-engineering-using-the-crispr-cas9-system-in-c-glabrata-wild-type-and-lig4-strains
#1
Yuke Cen, Bea Timmermans, Ben Souffriau, Johan M Thevelein, Patrick Van Dijck
Candida glabrata is reported as the second most prevalent human opportunistic fungal pathogen in North America and is threatening patients all over the world. Its incidence is rising, while it has developed resistance to the most widely used antifungal drugs, necessitating new approaches based on better insight into the biology of the organism. Despite its close phylogenetic relationship with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, generating precise genomic alterations in this species is problematic. Previously we have shown that deletion of LIG4, which encodes an enzyme involved in Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ), strongly enhances the probability of obtaining correctly modified transformants...
August 16, 2017: Fungal Genetics and Biology: FG & B
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28822354/3d-brain-organoids-derived-from-pluripotent-stem-cells-promising-experimental-models-for-brain-development-and-neurodegenerative-disorders
#2
REVIEW
Chun-Ting Lee, Raphael M Bendriem, Wells W Wu, Rong-Fong Shen
Three-dimensional (3D) brain organoids derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), appear to recapitulate the brain's 3D cytoarchitectural arrangement and provide new opportunities to explore disease pathogenesis in the human brain. Human iPSC (hiPSC) reprogramming methods, combined with 3D brain organoid tools, may allow patient-derived organoids to serve as a preclinical platform to bridge the translational gap between animal models and human clinical trials...
August 20, 2017: Journal of Biomedical Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28821813/metabolomic-and-lipidomic-profiling-identifies-the-role-of-the-rna-editing-pathway-in-endometrial-carcinogenesis
#3
Tatiana Altadill, Tyrone M Dowdy, Kirandeep Gill, Armando Reques, Smrithi S Menon, Cristian P Moiola, Carlos Lopez-Gil, Eva Coll, Xavier Matias-Guiu, Silvia Cabrera, Angel Garcia, Jaume Reventos, Stephen W Byers, Antonio Gil-Moreno, Amrita K Cheema, Eva Colas
Endometrial cancer (EC) remains the most common malignancy of the genital tract among women in developed countries. Although much research has been performed at genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic level, there is still a significant gap in the metabolomic studies of EC. In order to gain insights into altered metabolic pathways in the onset and progression of EC carcinogenesis, we used high resolution mass spectrometry to characterize the metabolomic and lipidomic profile of 39 human EC and 17 healthy endometrial tissue samples...
August 18, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28816237/genetics-human-genome-editing-in-heart-disease
#4
Gregory B Lim
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 17, 2017: Nature Reviews. Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28815851/basics-of-genome-editing-technology-and-its-application-in-livestock-species
#5
REVIEW
Bjoern Petersen
In the last decade, the research community has witnessed a blooming of targeted genome editing tools and applications. Novel programmable DNA nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like endonucleases (TALENs) and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 system (CRISPR/Cas9) possess long recognition sites and are capable of cutting DNA in a very specific manner. These DNA nucleases mediate targeted genetic alterations by enhancing the DNA mutation rate via induction of double-strand breaks at a predetermined genomic site...
August 2017: Reproduction in Domestic Animals, Zuchthygiene
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28814507/systematic-gene-tagging-using-crispr-cas9-in-human-stem-cells-to-illuminate-cell-organization
#6
Brock Roberts, Amanda Haupt, Andrew Tucker, Tanya Grancharova, Joy Arakaki, Margaret A Fuqua, Angelique Nelson, Caroline Hookway, Susan A Ludmann, Irina A Mueller, Ruian Yang, Alan R Horwitz, Susanne M Rafelski, Ruwanthi N Gunawardane
We present a CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing strategy to systematically tag endogenous proteins with fluorescent tags in human induced pluripotent stem cells. To date we have generated multiple human iPSC lines with monoallelic GFP tags labeling 10 proteins representing major cellular structures. The tagged proteins include alpha tubulin, beta actin, desmoplakin, fibrillarin, nuclear lamin B1, non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIB, paxillin, Sec61 beta, tight junction protein ZO1, and Tom20. Our genome editing methodology using Cas9/crRNA ribonuclear protein and donor plasmid co-electroporation, followed by fluorescence-based enrichment of edited cells, typically resulted in <0...
August 16, 2017: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28813413/polylox-barcoding-reveals-haematopoietic-stem-cell-fates-realized-in-vivo
#7
Weike Pei, Thorsten B Feyerabend, Jens Rössler, Xi Wang, Daniel Postrach, Katrin Busch, Immanuel Rode, Kay Klapproth, Nikolaus Dietlein, Claudia Quedenau, Wei Chen, Sascha Sauer, Stephan Wolf, Thomas Höfer, Hans-Reimer Rodewald
Developmental deconvolution of complex organs and tissues at the level of individual cells remains challenging. Non-invasive genetic fate mapping has been widely used, but the low number of distinct fluorescent marker proteins limits its resolution. Much higher numbers of cell markers have been generated using viral integration sites, viral barcodes, and strategies based on transposons and CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing; however, temporal and tissue-specific induction of barcodes in situ has not been achieved. Here we report the development of an artificial DNA recombination locus (termed Polylox) that enables broadly applicable endogenous barcoding based on the Cre-loxP recombination system...
August 16, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811667/genome-editing-crispr-cas-becoming-more-human
#8
Kim Baumann
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 16, 2017: Nature Reviews. Molecular Cell Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811362/nuclear-envelope-rupture-is-enhanced-by-loss-of-p53-or-rb
#9
Zhe Yang, John Maciejowski, Titia de Lange
The mammalian nuclear envelope (NE) forms a stable physical barrier between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, normally breaking down only during the cell cycle phase of mitosis. However, spontaneous transient NE rupture in interphase can occur when NE integrity is compromised such as when the nucleus experiences mechanical stress. For instance, deficiencies in the nuclear lamins and their associated proteins can cause NE rupture that is promoted by forces exerted by actin filaments. NE rupture can allow cytoplasmic nucleases to access chromatin, potentially compromising genome integrity...
August 15, 2017: Molecular Cancer Research: MCR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28806273/the-changing-landscape-of-gene-editing-in-hematopoietic-stem-cells-a-step-towards-cas9-clinical-translation
#10
Daniel P Dever, Matthew H Porteus
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Since the discovery two decades ago that programmable endonucleases can be engineered to modify human cells at single nucleotide resolution, the concept of genome editing was born. Now these technologies are being applied to therapeutically relevant cell types, including hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), which possess the power to repopulate an entire blood and immune system. The purpose of this review is to discuss the changing landscape of genome editing in hematopoietic stem cells (GE-HSC) from the discovery stage to the preclinical stage, with the imminent goal of clinical translation for the treatment of serious genetic diseases of the blood and immune system...
August 12, 2017: Current Opinion in Hematology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28800587/highly-efficient-gene-inactivation-by-adenoviral-crispr-cas9-in-human-primary-cells
#11
Olaf Voets, Frans Tielen, Edo Elstak, Julian Benschop, Max Grimbergen, Jan Stallen, Richard Janssen, Andre van Marle, Christian Essrich
Phenotypic assays using human primary cells are highly valuable tools for target discovery and validation in drug discovery. Expression knockdown (KD) of such targets in these assays allows the investigation of their role in models of disease processes. Therefore, efficient and fast modes of protein KD in phenotypic assays are required. The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been shown to be a versatile and efficient means of gene inactivation in immortalized cell lines. Here we describe the use of adenoviral (AdV) CRISPR/Cas9 vectors for efficient gene inactivation in two human primary cell types, normal human lung fibroblasts and human bronchial epithelial cells...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28798321/crispr-cas9-mediated-deletion-of-foxn1-in-nod-scid-il2rg-mice-results-in-severe-immunodeficiency
#12
Xinru Wei, Yunxin Lai, Baiheng Li, Le Qin, Youdi Xu, Simiao Lin, Suna Wang, Qiting Wu, Qiubin Liang, Guohua Huang, Qiuhua Deng, Pentao Liu, Donghai Wu, Liangxue Lai, Yao Yao, Peng Li
Immunodeficient mice engrafted with either normal or cancerous human cells are widely used in basic and translational research. In particular, NOD/SCID/IL2rg(-/-) mice can support the growth of various types of human cancer cells. However, the hairs of these mice interfere with the observation and imaging of engrafted tissues. Therefore, novel hairless strains exhibiting comparable immunodeficiency would be beneficial. Recently, the CRISPR/Cas9 system has been used for efficient multiplexed genome editing. In the present study, we generated a novel strain of nude NOD/SCID/IL2rg(-/-) (NSIN) mice by knocking out Foxn1 from NOD/SCID/IL2rg(-/-) (NSI) mice using the CRISPR/Cas9 system...
August 10, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28798120/u-s-attitudes-on-human-genome-editing
#13
Dietram A Scheufele, Michael A Xenos, Emily L Howell, Kathleen M Rose, Dominique Brossard, Bruce W Hardy
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 11, 2017: Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28783728/correction-of-a-pathogenic-gene-mutation-in-human-embryos
#14
Hong Ma, Nuria Marti-Gutierrez, Sang-Wook Park, Jun Wu, Yeonmi Lee, Keiichiro Suzuki, Amy Koski, Dongmei Ji, Tomonari Hayama, Riffat Ahmed, Hayley Darby, Crystal Van Dyken, Ying Li, Eunju Kang, A-Reum Park, Daesik Kim, Sang-Tae Kim, Jianhui Gong, Ying Gu, Xun Xu, David Battaglia, Sacha A Krieg, David M Lee, Diana H Wu, Don P Wolf, Stephen B Heitner, Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, Paula Amato, Jin-Soo Kim, Sanjiv Kaul, Shoukhrat Mitalipov
Genome editing has potential for the targeted correction of germline mutations. Here we describe the correction of the heterozygous MYBPC3 mutation in human preimplantation embryos with precise CRISPR-Cas9-based targeting accuracy and high homology-directed repair efficiency by activating an endogenous, germline-specific DNA repair response. Induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) at the mutant paternal allele were predominantly repaired using the homologous wild-type maternal gene instead of a synthetic DNA template...
August 2, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28783658/human-thymoproteasome-variations-influence-cd8-t-cell-selection
#15
Takeshi Nitta, Yuta Kochi, Ryunosuke Muro, Yoshihiko Tomofuji, Tadashi Okamura, Shigeo Murata, Harumi Suzuki, Takayuki Sumida, Kazuhiko Yamamoto, Hiroshi Takayanagi
The proteasome is a multi-subunit protease complex essential for housekeeping protein degradation and the production of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-bound antigen peptides that are essential for recognition by CD8 T cells. MHC variations dramatically contribute to T cell selection and autoimmunity, but genetic variations of peptide processing machinery including proteasome genes have been poorly explored in this context. In the computational analysis of human proteasome gene variation, we documented that PSMB11 was highly enriched for nucleotide changes that interfere with protein function...
June 2, 2017: Science Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28782493/big-data-and-genome-editing-technology-a-new-paradigm-of-cardiovascular-genomics
#16
Chayakrit Krittanawong, Tao Sun, Eyal Herzog
Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) encompasse a range of conditions extending from congenital heart disease to acute coronary syndrome most of which are heterogenous in nature and some of them are multiple genetic loci. However, the pathogenesis of most CVDs remains incompletely understood. The advance in genome-editing technologies, an engineering process of DNA sequences at precise genomic locations, has enabled a new paradigm that human genome can be precisely modified to achieve a therapeutic effect. Genome-editing includes the correction of genetic variants that cause disease, the addition of therapeutic genes to specific sites in the genomic locations, and the removal of deleterious genes or genome sequences...
August 4, 2017: Current Cardiology Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28777946/engineered-epidermal-progenitor-cells-can-correct-diet-induced-obesity-and-diabetes
#17
Jiping Yue, Xuewen Gou, Yuanyuan Li, Barton Wicksteed, Xiaoyang Wu
Somatic gene therapy is a promising approach for treating otherwise terminal or debilitating diseases. The human skin is a promising conduit for genetic engineering, as it is the largest and most accessible organ, epidermal autografts and tissue-engineered skin equivalents have been successfully deployed in clinical applications, and skin epidermal stem/progenitor cells for generating such grafts are easy to obtain and expand in vitro. Here, we develop skin grafts from mouse and human epidermal progenitors that were engineered by CRISPR-mediated genome editing to controllably release GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide 1), a critical incretin that regulates blood glucose homeostasis...
August 3, 2017: Cell Stem Cell
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28777929/human-germline-genome-editing
#18
REVIEW
Kelly E Ormond, Douglas P Mortlock, Derek T Scholes, Yvonne Bombard, Lawrence C Brody, W Andrew Faucett, Nanibaa' A Garrison, Laura Hercher, Rosario Isasi, Anna Middleton, Kiran Musunuru, Daniel Shriner, Alice Virani, Caroline E Young
With CRISPR/Cas9 and other genome-editing technologies, successful somatic and germline genome editing are becoming feasible. To respond, an American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) workgroup developed this position statement, which was approved by the ASHG Board in March 2017. The workgroup included representatives from the UK Association of Genetic Nurses and Counsellors, Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors, International Genetic Epidemiology Society, and US National Society of Genetic Counselors...
August 3, 2017: American Journal of Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28771191/somatic-host-cell-alterations-in-hpv-carcinogenesis
#19
REVIEW
Tamara R Litwin, Megan A Clarke, Michael Dean, Nicolas Wentzensen
High-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) infections cause cancers in different organ sites, most commonly cervical and head and neck cancers. While carcinogenesis is initiated by two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, increasing evidence shows the importance of specific somatic events in host cells for malignant transformation. HPV-driven cancers share characteristic somatic changes, including apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC)-driven mutations and genomic instability leading to copy number variations and large chromosomal rearrangements...
August 3, 2017: Viruses
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28767277/using-zebrafish-to-test-the-genetic-basis-of-human-craniofacial-diseases
#20
R Grecco Machado, B Frank Eames
Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) opened an innovative and productive avenue to investigate the molecular basis of human craniofacial disease. However, GWASs identify candidate genes only; they do not prove that any particular one is the functional villain underlying disease or just an unlucky genomic bystander. Genetic manipulation of animal models is the best approach to reveal which genetic loci identified from human GWASs are functionally related to specific diseases. The purpose of this review is to discuss the potential of zebrafish to resolve which candidate genetic loci are mechanistic drivers of craniofacial diseases...
August 1, 2017: Journal of Dental Research
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