Read by QxMD icon Read


Amanda Elton, Christopher T Smith, Michael H Parrish, Charlotte A Boettiger
Excessively choosing immediate over larger future rewards, or delay discounting (DD), associates with multiple clinical conditions. Individual differences in DD likely depend on variations in the activation of and functional interactions between networks, representing possible endophenotypes for associated disorders, including alcohol use disorders. Numerous fMRI studies have probed the neural bases of DD, but investigations of large-scale networks remain scant. We addressed this gap by testing whether activation within large-scale networks during Now/Later decision-making predicts individual differences in DD...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
S Beth Bierer, Elaine F Dannefer
PURPOSE: The move toward competency-based education will require medical schools and postgraduate training programs to restructure learning environments to motivate trainees to take personal ownership for learning. This qualitative study explores how medical students select and implement study strategies while enrolled in a unique, nontraditional program that emphasizes reflection on performance and competence rather than relying on high-stakes examinations or grades to motivate students to learn and excel...
November 2016: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Michael R Irwin, Naomi I Eisenberger
Neuropsychopharmacology accepted article preview online, 25 October 2016. doi:10.1038/npp.2016.245.
October 25, 2016: Neuropsychopharmacology: Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
Ya-Fu Lee, Yen-Min Kuo, Wen-Chen Chu
BACKGROUND: When facing a novel situation, animals can retreat or leave to avoid risks, but will miss potential resources and opportunities. Alternatively they may reduce environmental uncertainty by exploration, while risking no energy rewards and exposure to hazards, and use the information retrieved for subsequent decision making. When exploring, however, animals may adopt different tactics according to individual states. RESULTS: We tested that energy states will affect exploratory behavior by experimenting with wild-caught untrained Eurasian tree sparrows (Passer montanus) in fasted or fed states exploring in a novel space with hidden food supply in different patch distribution patterns...
2016: Frontiers in Zoology
Laura H Corbit, Patricia H Janak
Previous work has demonstrated that goal-directed control of alcohol-seeking and other drug-related behaviors is reduced following extended self-administration and drug exposure. Here, we examined how the magnitude of stimulus influences on responding changes across similar training and drug exposure. Rats self-administered alcohol or sucrose for 2 or 8 weeks. Previous work has shown that 8 weeks, but not 2 weeks of self-administration produces habitual alcohol seeking. Next, all animals received equivalent Pavlovian conditioning sessions where a discrete stimulus predicted the delivery of alcohol or sucrose...
2016: Frontiers in Psychiatry
Lourdes Luceño-Moreno, Yolanda García-Albuerne, Beatriz Talavera-Velasco, Jesús Martín-García
BACKGROUND: In the police force, some variables such as occupational rank, sex, age and work-shift are associated with stress in workers. The aim of this paper was to determine possible differences in the perception of occupational stress at work depending on rank, sex, age and work-shift of police agents in the Community of Madrid, Spain. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 24 municipalities of the Community of Madrid. A total number of 565 police agents participated...
November 2016: Psicothema
Sheng-Ren Chen, Yi-Yu Ke, Teng-Kuang Yeh, Shu-Yu Lin, Li-Chin Ou, Shu-Chun Chen, Wan-Ting Chang, Hsiao-Fu Chang, Zih-Huei Wu, Chih-Chien Hsieh, Ping-Yee Law, Horace H Loh, Chuan Shih, Yiu-Kay Lai, Shiu-Hwa Yeh, Shau-Hua Ueng
μ-Opioid receptor (MOR) agonists are analgesics used clinically for the treatment of moderate to severe pain, but their use is associated with severe adverse effects such as respiratory depression, constipation, tolerance, dependence, and rewarding effects. In this study, we identified N-({2-[(4-bromo-2-trifluoromethoxyphenyl)sulfonyl]-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-isoquinolinyl}methyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide (1) as a novel opioid receptor agonist by high-throughput screening. Structural modifications made to 1 to improve potency and blood-brain-barrier (BBB) penetration resulted in compounds 45 and 46...
September 20, 2016: European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry
Michael F Regner, Naomi Saenz, Keeran Maharajh, Dorothy J Yamamoto, Brianne Mohl, Korey Wylie, Jason Tregellas, Jody Tanabe
OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that compared to healthy controls, long-term abstinent substance dependent individuals (SDI) will differ in their effective connectivity between large-scale brain networks and demonstrate increased directional information from executive control to interoception-, reward-, and habit-related networks. In addition, using graph theory to compare network efficiencies we predicted decreased small-worldness in SDI compared to controls. METHODS: 50 SDI and 50 controls of similar sex and age completed psychological surveys and resting state fMRI...
2016: PloS One
Alexander Soutschek, Christian C Ruff, Tina Strombach, Tobias Kalenscher, Philippe N Tobler
Neurobiological models of self-control predominantly focus on the role of prefrontal brain mechanisms involved in emotion regulation and impulse control. We provide evidence for an entirely different neural mechanism that promotes self-control by overcoming bias for the present self, a mechanism previously thought to be mainly important for interpersonal decision-making. In two separate studies, we show that disruptive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the temporo-parietal junction-a brain region involved in overcoming one's self-centered perspective-increases the discounting of delayed and prosocial rewards...
October 2016: Science Advances
J Graham Thomas, Andrew Seiden, Mikhail N Koffarnus, Warren K Bickel, Rena R Wing
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine how sensitivity to short-term reward and long-term goal perseverance are related to body mass index (BMI; kg m(2)) in a large sample of men and women with and without obesity. METHODS: A total of 450 participants (56.2% male; 73.1% non-Hispanic White) with mean ± standard deviation age of 30.7 ± 10.4 years and BMI of 29.3 ± 8.2 completed online versions of the Delayed Reward Discounting task to measure sensitivity to short-term reward and the Grit Scale to measure long-term goal perseverance...
December 2015: Obesity Science & Practice
Li Zhou, Ping Chen, Yating Peng, Ruoyun Ouyang
Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by chronic nocturnal intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentations. Neurocognitive dysfunction, a significant and extraordinary complication of OSAS, influences patients' career, family, and social life and reduces quality of life to some extent. Previous researches revealed that repetitive hypoxia and reoxygenation caused mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum dysfunction, overactivated NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase, and uncoupling nitric oxide synthase, induced an imbalance between prooxidants and antioxidants, and then got rise to a series of oxidative stress (OS) responses, such as protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and DNA oxidation along with inflammatory reaction...
2016: Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Dawn M Eichen, Eunice Y Chen, Mark F Schmitz, Jean Arlt, Michael S McCloskey
Almost 40% of individuals with eating disorders have a comorbid addiction. The current study examined weight/shape concerns as a potential moderator of the relation between the hypothesized latent factor "addiction vulnerability" (i.e., impairments in reward sensitivity, affect regulation and impulsivity) and binge eating. Undergraduate women (n=272) with either high or low weight/shape concerns completed self-report measures examining reward sensitivity, emotion regulation, impulsivity and disordered (binge) eating...
October 2016: Personality and Individual Differences
Fangyuan Yin, Yuanyuan Ji, Jing Zhang, Hao Guo, Xin Huang, Jianghua Lai, Shuguang Wei
Previous studies suggested that the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 3B (HTR3B) is involved in heroin dependence by modulating dopamine (DA) release in the reward pathway and that the genetic polymorphisms in HTR3B play plausible role in modulating the risk of developing heroin addiction. To identify markers that contribute to the genetic susceptibility to heroin dependence, we examined the potential associations between heroin dependence and 7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the HTR3B gene using multiplex SNaPshot technology in a Chinese Han population...
October 20, 2016: Neuroscience Letters
Vidya Narayanaswami, Linda P Dwoskin
Obesity is a global epidemic that contributes to a number of health complications including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer and neuropsychiatric disorders. Pharmacotherapeutic strategies to treat obesity are urgently needed. Research over the past two decades has increased substantially our knowledge of central and peripheral mechanisms underlying homeostatic energy balance. Homeostatic mechanisms involve multiple components including neuronal circuits, some originating in hypothalamus and brain stem, as well as peripherally-derived satiety, hunger and adiposity signals that modulate neural activity and regulate eating behavior...
October 20, 2016: Pharmacology & Therapeutics
Leopold Zangemeister, Fabian Grabenhorst, Wolfram Schultz
Economic saving is an elaborate behavior in which the goal of a reward in the future directs planning and decision-making in the present. Here, we measured neural activity while subjects formed simple economic saving strategies to accumulate rewards and then executed their strategies through choice sequences of self-defined lengths. Before the initiation of a choice sequence, prospective activations in the amygdala predicted subjects' internal saving plans and their value up to two minutes before a saving goal was achieved...
October 19, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Keqiang Xie, Lesley A Colgan, Maria T Dao, Brian S Muntean, Laurie P Sutton, Cesare Orlandi, Sanford L Boye, Shannon E Boye, Chien-Cheng Shih, Yuqing Li, Baoji Xu, Roy G Smith, Ryohei Yasuda, Kirill A Martemyanov
It is well recognized that G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can activate Ras-regulated kinase pathways to produce lasting changes in neuronal function. Mechanisms by which GPCRs transduce these signals and their relevance to brain disorders are not well understood. Here, we identify a major Ras regulator, neurofibromin 1 (NF1), as a direct effector of GPCR signaling via Gβγ subunits in the striatum. We find that binding of Gβγ to NF1 inhibits its ability to inactivate Ras. Deletion of NF1 in striatal neurons prevents the opioid-receptor-induced activation of Ras and eliminates its coupling to Akt-mTOR-signaling pathway...
October 18, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Adrian Loerbroks, Sung-Il Cho, Maureen F Dollard, Jianfang Zou, Joachim E Fischer, Yueying Jiang, Peter Angerer, Raphael M Herr, Jian Li
OBJECTIVE: Epidemiological evidence suggests that work stress is associated with suicidal ideation (SI). However, only few studies in this area have drawn on well-established theoretical work stress models (i.e., the job-demand-control [JDC] model, the effort-reward-imbalance [ERI] model, and the model of organizational injustice [OJ]). Utilization of such models allows though for theory-based assessments and workplace interventions. Since evidence on those models' relationship with suicide-related outcomes is currently inconclusive (with regard to JDC), markedly sparse (OJ) or lacking (ERI), we aimed to provide additional or initial evidence...
November 2016: Journal of Psychosomatic Research
Anke Maatz, Megan Wainwright, Andrew J Russell, Jane Macnaughton, Yan Yiannakou
BACKGROUND: The term 'difficult' is pervasively used in relation to medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) and patients with MUS. This article scrutinises the use of the term by analysing interview data from a study of secondary care specialists' experiences with and attitudes towards patients suffering from MUS. DESIGN: Qualitative design employing semi-structured open-ended interviews systematically analysed in three stages: first, data were analysed according to the principles of content analysis...
November 2016: Journal of Psychosomatic Research
Roee Admon, Roselinde H Kaiser, Daniel G Dillon, Miranda Beltzer, Franziska Goer, David P Olson, Gordana Vitaliano, Diego A Pizzagalli
OBJECTIVE: Major depressive disorder is characterized by reduced reward-related striatal activation and dysfunctional reward learning, putatively reflecting decreased dopaminergic signaling. The goal of this study was to test whether a pharmacological challenge designed to facilitate dopaminergic transmission can enhance striatal responses to reward and improve reward learning in depressed individuals. METHOD: In a double-blind placebo-controlled design, 46 unmedicated depressed participants and 43 healthy control participants were randomly assigned to receive either placebo or a single low dose (50 mg) of the D2/D3 receptor antagonist amisulpride, which is believed to increase dopamine signaling through presynaptic autoreceptor blockade...
October 24, 2016: American Journal of Psychiatry
Adam M Leventhal, Matthew G Kirkpatrick, Mollie S Pester, John E McGeary, Robert M Swift, Steve Sussman, Christopher W Kahler
RATIONALE: A previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) in a predominately Caucasian sample of healthy young adults linked greater amphetamine-induced rewarding effects with the rs3784943 G allele of the cadherin 13 (CDH13; i.e., a cell adhesion molecule implicated in neuronal connectivity) gene. This association has not been subsequently examined, nor has it been studied in Asian populations, which may have greater frequencies of the risk allele. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine the association of rs3784943 with amphetamine response in a racially heterogeneous sample (37 % Asian) of healthy young adults...
October 22, 2016: Psychopharmacology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"