keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Reward

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28926739/electrophysiological-correlates-of-performance-monitoring-in-binge-drinking-impaired-error-related-but-preserved-feedback-processing
#1
Séverine Lannoy, Fabien D'Hondt, Valérie Dormal, Joël Billieux, Pierre Maurage
OBJECTIVE: Performance monitoring, which allows efficient behavioral regulation using either internal (error processing) or external (feedback processing) cues, has not yet been explored in binge drinking despite its adaptive importance in everyday life, particularly in the regulation of alcohol consumption. Capitalizing on a theoretical model of risky behaviors, the present study aimed at determining the behavioral and electrophysiological correlates of the cognitive (inhibition) and motivational (reward sensitivity) systems during performance monitoring...
September 2, 2017: Clinical Neurophysiology: Official Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28926615/predicting-the-reward-value-of-faces-and-bodies-from-social-perception
#2
Danielle Morrison, Hongyi Wang, Amanda C Hahn, Benedict C Jones, Lisa M DeBruine
Social judgments of faces are thought to be underpinned by two perceptual components: valence and dominance. Recent work using a standard key-press task to assess reward value found that these valence and dominance components were both positively related to the reward value of faces. Although bodies play an important role in human social interaction, the perceptual dimensions that underpin social judgments of bodies and their relationship to the reward value of bodies are not yet known. The current study investigated these issues...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28926344/the-effect-of-severity-of-illness-on-spine-surgery-costs-across-new-york-state-hospitals-an-analysis-of-69-831-cases
#3
I David Kaye, Murillo Adrados, Raj J Karia, Themistocles S Protopsaltis, Joseph A Bosco
STUDY DESIGN: Observational database review. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of patient severity of illness (SOI) on the cost of spine surgery among New York state hospitals. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: National health care spending has risen at an unsustainable rate with musculoskeletal care, and spine surgery in particular, accounting for a significant portion of this expenditure. In an effort towards cost-containment, health care payers are exploring novel payment models some of which reward cost savings but penalize excessive spending...
September 18, 2017: Clinical Spine Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28925611/rural-surgery-high-pressure-but-rewarding
#4
Susan Long
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2017: Bulletin of the American College of Surgeons
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28924013/reward-related-ventral-striatum-activity-buffers-against-the-experience-of-depressive-symptoms-associated-with-sleep-disturbances
#5
Reut Avinun, Adam Nevo, Annchen R Knodt, Maxwell L Elliott, Spenser R Radtke, Bartholomew D Brigidi, Ahmad R Hariri
Sleep disturbances represent one risk factor for depression. Reward-related brain function, particularly the activity of the ventral striatum (VS), has been identified as a potential buffer against stress-related depression. We were therefore interested in testing whether reward-related VS activity would moderate the effect of sleep disturbances on depression in a large cohort of young adults. Data were available from 1129 university students (mean age 19.71 ± 1.25 years; 637 women) who completed a reward-related functional MRI task to assay VS activity and provided self-reports of sleep using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and symptoms of depression using a summation of the General Distress/Depression (GDD) and Anhedonic Depression (AD) subscales of the Mood and Anxiety Symptoms Questionnaire-short form...
September 18, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28923918/continuous-track-paths-reveal-additive-evidence-integration-in-multistep-decision-making
#6
Cristian Buc Calderon, Myrtille Dewulf, Wim Gevers, Tom Verguts
Multistep decision making pervades daily life, but its underlying mechanisms remain obscure. We distinguish four prominent models of multistep decision making, namely serial stage, hierarchical evidence integration, hierarchical leaky competing accumulation (HLCA), and probabilistic evidence integration (PEI). To empirically disentangle these models, we design a two-step reward-based decision paradigm and implement it in a reaching task experiment. In a first step, participants choose between two potential upcoming choices, each associated with two rewards...
September 18, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28923520/exploring-associations-between-state-education-initiatives-and-teachers-sleep-a-social-ecological-approach
#7
Kaori Fujishiro, Amy N Farley, Marie Kellemen, Christopher M Swoboda
Social policies that are not specifically aimed at impacting health can still have health consequences. State education reforms, such as standardized testing and stringent accountability for schools and teachers, may affect teacher health by changing their working conditions. This study explores associations between state education initiatives and teachers' sleep, an important predictor of productivity and chronic health conditions. The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2013 and 2014 data sets provided sleep and demographic data for 7836 teachers in 29 states in the United States...
September 12, 2017: Social Science & Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28923479/neuralrepresentation-of-cost-benefit-selectionsin-medial-prefrontal-cortex-of-rats
#8
Hua Tang, Xuan Sun, Bao-Ming Li, Fei Luo
Decision making refers to the process that subjects use to choose between competing courses of action based on the expected costs and benefits of their consequences. However, few studies have addressed the neuronal mechanisms behind the processes of howcosts and benefits influence decision making. Here we investigated the neuronal representation of costs and benefitstowards a goal-directed action under a differential reward schedule by training rats to perform a "Do more, get more" (DM-GM) task utilizinga nosepoke operandum, where longer nosepoke durations resulted in correspondingly larger rewards...
September 15, 2017: Neuroscience Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28923360/when-theory-and-biology-differ-the-relationship-between-reward-prediction-errors-and-expectancy
#9
Chad C Williams, Cameron D Hassall, Robert Trska, Clay B Holroyd, Olave E Krigolson
Comparisons between expectations and outcomes are critical for learning. Termed prediction errors, the violations of expectancy that occur when outcomes differ from expectations are used to modify value and shape behaviour. In the present study, we examined how a wide range of expectancy violations impacted neural signals associated with feedback processing. Participants performed a time estimation task in which they had to guess the duration of one second while their electroencephalogram was recorded. In a key manipulation, we varied task difficulty across the experiment to create a range of different feedback expectancies - reward feedback was either very expected, expected, 50/50, unexpected, or very unexpected...
September 15, 2017: Biological Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28922858/contributions-of-the-medial-prefrontal-cortex-to-social-influence-in-economic-decision-making
#10
M A J Apps, N Ramnani
Economic decisions are guided by highly subjective reward valuations (SVs). Often these SVs are over-ridden when individuals conform to social norms. Yet, the neural mechanisms that underpin the distinct processing of such normative reward valuations (NVs) are poorly understood. The dorsomedial and ventromedial portions of the prefrontal cortex (dmPFC/vmPFC) are putatively key regions for processing social and economic information respectively. However, the contribution of these regions to economic decisions guided by social norms is unclear...
September 1, 2017: Cerebral Cortex
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28922835/rewards-and-cognitive-control-in-the-human-prefrontal-cortex
#11
Sandrine Duverne, Etienne Koechlin
The human prefrontal cortex (PFC) subserves cognitive control, that is, the ability to form behavioral strategies that coordinate actions and thoughts in relation to internal goals. Cognitive control involves the medial and lateral PFC but we still poorly understand how these regions guide strategy selection according to expected rewards. We addressed this issue using neuroimaging, computational modeling and model-based analyses of information flows between medial and lateral PFC. We show here that the (dorsal) medial PFC encodes and conveys to lateral PFC reward expectations driving strategy selection, while strategy selection originates in lateral PFC and propagates backward to medial PFC...
October 1, 2017: Cerebral Cortex
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28922126/functional-contour-following-via-haptic-perception-and-reinforcement-learning
#12
Randall B Hellman, Cem Tekin, Mihaela van der Schaar, Veronica J Santos
Many tasks involve the fine manipulation of objects despite limited visual feedback. In such scenarios, tactile and proprioceptive feedback can be leveraged for task completion. We present an approach for real-time haptic perception and decision-making for a haptics-driven, functional contour-following task: the closure of a ziplock bag. This task is challenging for robots because the bag is deformable, transparent, and visually occluded by artificial fingertip sensors that are also compliant. A deep neural net classifier was trained to estimate the state of a zipper within a robot's pinch grasp...
September 18, 2017: IEEE Transactions on Haptics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28922051/effect-of-hospital-simulation-tutorials-on-nursing-and-pharmacy-student-perception-of-interprofessional-collaboration-findings-from-a-pilot-study
#13
Paulina Stehlik, Astrid Frotjold, Carl R Schneider
Interprofessional learning (IPL) during formal training enables interprofessional collaboration (IPC) in the workforce; however, on-campus IPL opportunities are seldom incorporated into curricula. We describe the development and implementation of two hospital simulation tutorials between nursing and pharmacy students. Students were required to provide "usual care" to a simulated patient at admission and discharge. A pre-post survey design was used to evaluate changes in Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS) score and student perceived educational value of the tutorials...
September 18, 2017: Journal of Interprofessional Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28920185/motivational-wheel-running-reverses-cueing-behavioural-inflexibility-in-rodents
#14
Taylor Chomiak, Andrew R Brown, G Campbell Teskey, Bin Hu
Behavioural inflexibility and associated atypical learning behaviours are common clinical manifestations of the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) phenotype. Despite advances in our understanding of ASD, little research has been devoted to experimental interventions that might help to circumvent behavioural inflexibility in ASD. The current paper suggests that motivational locomotion in the form of wheel running can reduce behavioural inflexibility and learning impairments in an ASD rat model, and discusses how the strategy of reward-coupled locomotor activity may lead to clinical interventions for children with ASD...
September 18, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28919371/perinatal-deficiency-in-dietary-omega-3-fatty-acids-potentiates-sucrose-reward-and-diet-induced-obesity-in-mice
#15
Stéphanie Auguste, Sandeep Sharma, Alexandre Fisette, Caroline Daneault, Christine Des Rosiers, Stephanie Fulton
Insufficient dietary intake of essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (N-3), especially during critical stages of development, is well-associated with negative neurological and metabolic consequences. The increased availability and intake of foods rich in saturated fat coincides with reduced N-3 consumption, yet how N-3 dietary deficiency during perinatal development modulates motivation for palatable food and interacts with a high-fat diet to affect body weight and emotional states is not clear. Pregnant C57Bl6 mice and pups were subjected to diets either deficient or adequate (control) in N-3 until postnatal day 21...
September 14, 2017: International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28919222/understanding-active-sampling-strategies-empirical-approaches-and-implications-for-attention-and-decision-research
#16
REVIEW
Jacqueline Gottlieb
In natural behavior we actively gather information using attention and active sensing behaviors (such as shifts of gaze) to sample relevant cues. However, while attention and decision making are naturally coordinated, in the laboratory they have been dissociated. Attention is studied independently of the actions it serves. Conversely, decision theories make the simplifying assumption that the relevant information is given, and do not attempt to describe how the decision maker may learn and implement active sampling policies...
August 24, 2017: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28918701/supporting-family-involvement-in-long-term-residential-care-promising-practices-for-relational-care
#17
Rachel Barken, Ruth Lowndes
Family members and friends provide significant support for older relatives in long-term residential care (LTRC). Yet, they occupy ambiguous positions in these settings, and their relationships with LTRC staff can involve conflicts and challenges. Based on an ethnographic project carried out in North America and Europe, this article identifies practices that promote meaningful family participation in care home life. We consider instances of rewarding family involvement upon admission to LTRC, throughout the time a relative is living in a care home, and during the final stages of life...
September 1, 2017: Qualitative Health Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28918547/adaptive-step-goals-and-rewards-a-longitudinal-growth-model-of-daily-steps-for-a-smartphone-based-walking-intervention
#18
Elizabeth V Korinek, Sayali S Phatak, Cesar A Martin, Mohammad T Freigoun, Daniel E Rivera, Marc A Adams, Pedja Klasnja, Matthew P Buman, Eric B Hekler
Adaptive interventions are an emerging class of behavioral interventions that allow for individualized tailoring of intervention components over time to a person's evolving needs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate an adaptive step goal + reward intervention, grounded in Social Cognitive Theory delivered via a smartphone application (Just Walk), using a mixed modeling approach. Participants (N = 20) were overweight (mean BMI = 33.8 ± 6.82 kg/m(2)), sedentary adults (90% female) interested in participating in a 14-week walking intervention...
September 16, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28918313/learning-with-three-factors-modulating-hebbian-plasticity-with-errors
#19
REVIEW
Łukasz Kuśmierz, Takuya Isomura, Taro Toyoizumi
Synaptic plasticity is a central theme in neuroscience. A framework of three-factor learning rules provides a powerful abstraction, helping to navigate through the abundance of models of synaptic plasticity. It is well-known that the dopamine modulation of learning is related to reward, but theoretical models predict other functional roles of the modulatory third factor; it may encode errors for supervised learning, summary statistics of the population activity for unsupervised learning or attentional feedback...
September 14, 2017: Current Opinion in Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28918312/-reinforcement-learning-to-forage-optimally
#20
REVIEW
Nils Kolling, Thomas Akam
Foraging effectively is critical to the survival of all animals and this imperative is thought to have profoundly shaped brain evolution. Decisions made by foraging animals often approximate optimal strategies, but the learning and decision mechanisms generating these choices remain poorly understood. Recent work with laboratory foraging tasks in humans suggest their behaviour is poorly explained by model-free reinforcement learning, with simple heuristic strategies better describing behaviour in some tasks, and in others evidence of prospective prediction of the future state of the environment...
September 14, 2017: Current Opinion in Neurobiology
keyword
keyword
7366
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"