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Wilsons disease

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433216/implications-of-alternative-hepatorenal-prognostic-scoring-systems-in-acute-heart-failure-from-dose-ahf-and-rose-ahf
#1
Justin L Grodin, Dianne Gallup, Kevin J Anstrom, G Michael Felker, Horng H Chen, W H Wilson Tang
Because hepatic dysfunction is common in patients with heart failure (HF), the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) may be attractive for risk stratification. Although alternative scores such as the MELD-XI or MELD-Na may be more appropriate in HF populations, the short-term clinical implications of these in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) are unknown. The MELD-XI and MELD-Na were calculated at baseline in 453 patients with AHF in the DOSE-AHF and ROSE-AHF trials. The correlations and associations for each score with cardiorenal biomarkers, short-term end points at 72 hours including worsening renal function and clinical events to 60 days were determined...
March 29, 2017: American Journal of Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433114/hepatic-features-of-wilson-disease
#2
Salih Boga, Aftab Ala, Michael L Schilsky
In Wilson disease (WD) defective AT7B function leads to biliary copper excretion and pathologic copper accumulation, particularly in liver and brain, where it induces cellular damage. Liver disease most often precedes neurologic or psychiatric manifestations. In most patients with neurologic or psychiatric symptoms there is some degree of liver disease at the time of disease presentation. Hepatic manifestations of WD can be extremely variable. Patients with clinically asymptomatic WD are often found by family screening or identified on routine laboratory testing...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433113/wilson-disease-brain-pathology
#3
Aurélia Poujois, Jacqueline Mikol, France Woimant
In Wilson disease (WD), brain cellular damage is thought to be due to copper deposition. Striatal lesions are the most characteristic lesions found in the brain of patients with neurologic symptoms, as emphasized in the initial reports of S.A.K. Wilson. WD brain lesions can be more diffuse, including in the pons, midbrain, thalamus, dentate nucleus, and, less frequently, corpus callosum and cortex. In rare cases, extensive cortical-subcortical lesions have been reported. Increased cellularity is noted in the lesions due to the proliferation of modified astrocytes named Alzheimer types of glia and specific cells, called Opalski cells, that are characteristic of WD...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433112/wilson-disease-liver-pathology
#4
Maciej Pronicki
The liver in Wilson disease may demonstrate a wide range of damage patterns. Some patients may present almost no detectable microscopic pathology, while others display lesions consistent with fulminant hepatitis or acute liver failure. Most liver biopsy specimens show moderate to severe steatosis, variable degree of portal and/or lobular inflammation, and fibrosis eventually progressing to cirrhosis. Additional findings include liver cell degeneration and ballooning, Mallory hyaline bodies, liver cell necrosis, and glycogenation of periportal hepatocytic nuclei...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433111/epidemiology-and-introduction-to-the-clinical-presentation-of-wilson-disease
#5
Christine Lo, Oliver Bandmann
Our understanding of the epidemiology of Wilson disease has steadily grown since Sternlieb and Scheinberg's first prevalence estimate of 5 per million individuals in 1968. Increasingly sophisticated genetic techniques have led to revised genetic prevalence estimates of 142 per million. Various population isolates exist where the prevalence of Wilson disease is higher still, the highest being 885 per million from within the mountainous region of Rucar in Romania. In Sardinia, where the prevalence of Wilson disease has been calculated at 370 per million births, six mutations account for around 85% of Wilson disease chromosomes identified...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433110/animal-models-of-wilson-disease
#6
Valentina Medici, Dominik Huster
Wilson disease (WD) is caused by ATPase copper-transporting beta (ATP7B) mutations and results in copper toxicity in liver and brain. Although the defective gene was identified in 1993, the specific mechanisms underlying copper toxicity and the remarkable phenotypic diversity of the disease are still poorly understood. Animal models harboring defects in the ATP7B homolog have helped to reveal new insights into pathomechanisms of WD. Four rodent models with ATP7B gene defects have been described - the Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat, inbred mouse models (toxic milk (tx), the Jackson Laboratory toxic milk (tx-j)), and the genetically engineered ATP7B(-/-) (knockout) mouse - all of which develop liver disease to different extents...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433109/pathogenesis-of-wilson-disease
#7
Ivo Florin Scheiber, Radan Brůha, Petr Dušek
Wilson disease is an autosomal-recessive disorder originating from a genetic defect in the copper-transporting ATPase ATP7B that is required for biliary copper secretion and loading of ceruloplasmin with copper. Impaired ATP7B function in Wilson disease results in excessive accumulation of copper in liver, brain, and other tissues. Toxic copper deposits may induce oxidative stress, modify expression of genes, directly inhibit proteins, and impair mitochondrial function, leading to hepatic, neuropsychiatric, renal, musculoskeletal, and other symptoms...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433108/genetic-and-environmental-modifiers-of-wilson-disease
#8
Valentina Medici, Karl-Heinz Weiss
Wilson disease (WD) is characterized by remarkable variety in its phenotypic presentation. Patients with WD can present with hepatic, neurologic, and psychiatric symptoms combined in different and unpredictable ways. Importantly, no convincing phenotype-genotype correlation has ever been identified, opening the possibility that other genes, aside from ATPase copper-transporting beta (ATP7B), are involved in the pathogenesis of this condition. In addition, modifier genes, or genes that can affect the expression of other genes, may be involved...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433107/patient-support-groups-in-the-management-of-wilson-disease
#9
Mary L Graper, Michael L Schilsky
Patient support groups serve an important function for those affected by a disease but especially for people with a rare disease. Because of the complexity of Wilson disease there are some unique and difficult problems faced by groups that advocate for these patients. We give a comparative overview of the differences between groups that support people with more common diseases and groups that serve the rare disease population. The history and current status of the Wilson Disease Association and other worldwide Wilson disease groups are described and information about other organizations that support Wilson disease in additional ways is explained...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433106/novel-perspectives-on-wilson-disease-treatment
#10
Christian Rupp, Wolfgang Stremmel, Karl-Heinz Weiss
Wilson disease is an autosomal-recessive copper overload disorder causing hepatic and neurologic symptoms. Commonly used medical therapy shows satisfactory results with regard to hepatic disease but only limited effects in neurologically affected patients. In recent years several new therapy options have been developed, showing promising results that might improve the management of Wilson disease in the near future. Optimization of treatment regimens depending on biochemical response pattern seems worthwhile, especially in the decoppering phase of therapy...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433105/symptomatic-treatment-of-neurologic-symptoms-in-wilson-disease
#11
Tomasz Litwin, Petr Dušek, Anna Członkowska
Wilson disease (WD) is a potentially treatable neurodegenerative disorder. In the majority of cases, treatment with drugs that induce a negative copper balance (usually chelators or zinc salts) leads to improvements in liver function and neurologic signs. However, some patients show severe neurologic symptoms at diagnosis, such as tremor, dystonia, parkinsonism, and chorea. In this patient group, some neurologic deficits may persist despite adequate treatment, and further neurologic deterioration may be observed after treatment initiation...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433104/wilson-disease-symptomatic-liver-therapy
#12
Jan Pfeiffenberger, Karl-Heinz Weiss, Wolfgang Stremmel
Wilson disease leads to symptomatic impairment of liver function or liver cirrhosis. Strict adherence to decoppering agents is essential in these patients. Secondary prevention of additional hepatic damage by avoidance of other toxic substances (e.g., alcohol, drugs) and sufficient calorie intake is recommended. Routine examinations in cirrhotic patients include screening for signs of portal hypertension (esophagus varices), development of ascites, and hepatic encephalopathy. Where varices are present, primary or secondary preventive interventions may include treatment with nonselective beta-blockers or variceal ligation, similar to the approach in patients with liver cirrhosis due to other etiologies...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433103/liver-transplantation-for-wilson-disease
#13
Ahsan Ahmad, Euriko Torrazza-Perez, Michael L Schilsky
Liver transplantation (LT) is a life-saving and curative treatment for Wilson disease (WD), providing restoration of function of the liver and mitigation of portal hypertension. Indications for LT in patients with WD include acute liver failure or end-stage liver disease not treatable by medical therapy. LT is also used to treat hepatocellular carcinoma when it develops in patients with WD when tumor resection is not feasible. LT solely for neurologic or psychiatric WD remains controversial. Living liver donation as well as cadaveric orthotopic and auxiliary LT are options for transplantation for WD...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433102/the-genetics-of-wilson-disease
#14
Irene J Chang, Si Houn Hahn
Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal-recessive disorder of hepatocellular copper deposition caused by pathogenic variants in the copper-transporting gene, ATP7B. Early detection and treatment are critical to prevent lifelong neuropsychiatric, hepatic, and systemic disabilities. Due to the marked heterogeneity in age of onset and clinical presentation, the diagnosis of Wilson disease remains challenging to physicians today. Direct sequencing of the ATP7B gene is the most sensitive and widely used confirmatory testing method, and concurrent biochemical testing improves diagnostic accuracy...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433101/wilson-disease-currently-used-anticopper-therapy
#15
Anna Członkowska, Tomasz Litwin
Wilson disease (WD) is a genetic disorder of copper metabolism that can be treated successfully with pharmacologic treatment. Two groups of drugs are currently used: chelators (e.g., d-penicillamine and trientine), which increase urinary copper excretion, and zinc salts, which inhibit copper absorption in the digestive tract. The mechanisms of action lead to a negative copper balance, stopping pathologic accumulation of copper in the tissues and clearing affected organs of copper overload. Due to a lack of prospective clinical trials, the use of drugs depends mainly on center experience and the accessibility in different countries or regions...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433100/diagnosis-of-wilson-disease
#16
Peter Ferenci
Clinical presentation of Wilson disease can vary widely; therefore diagnosis is not always straightforward. Wilson disease is not just a disease of children and young adults, but may present at any age. The key features of Wilson disease are liver disease and cirrhosis, neuropsychiatric disturbances, Kayser-Fleischer rings, and acute episodes of hemolysis, often in association with acute liver failure. Diagnosis is particularly difficult in children and in adults presenting with active liver disease. None of the available laboratory tests is perfect and may not be specific for Wilson disease...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433099/other-organ-involvement-and-clinical-aspects-of-wilson-disease
#17
Karolina Dzieżyc, Tomasz Litwin, Anna Członkowska
Wilson disease (WD) is a rare disorder of copper metabolism that presents mainly with hepatic and neuropsychiatric features. Copper accumulates not only in the liver and brain, but also in other organs. Liver injury can also be the cause of secondary impairment of other tissues. Therefore, the clinical manifestation of WD may be renal, cardiac, skin, osteoarticular, or endocrinologic and include other organ disturbances. Renal abnormalities include tubular dysfunction (e.g., renal tubular acidosis, aminoaciduria) and nephrolithiasis...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433098/wilson-disease-in-children
#18
Eve A Roberts, Piotr Socha
Wilson disease (WD) is an inherited disorder mainly of hepatocellular copper disposition, due to dysfunction of the Wilson ATPase, a P1B-ATPase encoded by the gene ATP7B. In children, as in older age brackets, clinical disease is highly diverse. Although hepatic disease is the common presentation in children/adolescents, neurologic, psychiatric, and hematologic clinical presentations do occur. Very young children may have clinically evident liver disease due to WD. Early diagnosis, preferably when the child/adolescent is asymptomatic, is most likely to result in near-normal longevity with generally good health so long as the patient tolerates effective medication, is adherent to the lifelong treatment regimen, and has consistent access to the medication...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433097/cognitive-and-psychiatric-symptoms-in-wilson-disease
#19
Paula Zimbrean, Joanna Seniów
Wilson disease - can present with such a variety of psychiatric and cognitive symptoms that it has been named the "great masquerader." Symptoms may include cognitive deficits, impairment of executive function, mood disturbance or psychosis. These impairments may occur in different stages of the disease and with varying intensity in individual patients. This chapter reviews the literature and authors' clinical experiences of the assessment, mechanism, and prevalence of cognitive and psychiatric pathology occurring in Wilson disease...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433096/wilson-disease-neurologic-features
#20
Anna Członkowska, Tomasz Litwin, Grzegorz Chabik
Wilson disease (WD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, which presents as a spectrum of neurologic manifestations that includes tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, dystonia, chorea, dysarthria, and dysphagia, together with a combination of neurologic symptoms that can easily lead to misdiagnosis. An early diagnosis of WD, and appropriate anticopper treatment, usually leads to a marked improvement in patient health. Conversely, delayed diagnosis can result in persistent pathology, which, left untreated, can ultimately prove lethal...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
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