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Ashley A Yttredahl, Erin McRobert, Benjamin Sheler, Brian J Mickey, Tiffany M Love, Scott A Langenecker, Jon-Kar Zubieta, David T Hsu
INTRODUCTION: Responding adaptively to one's social environment is a key factor predicting the course of major depressive disorder (MDD). Socially rejecting events can exacerbate, whereas socially accepting events can ameliorate depressive symptoms. The neural responses to rejection and acceptance in MDD are relatively unexplored. METHODS: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure neural responses to romantic rejection and acceptance in women diagnosed with current MDD (n = 19) and a matched group of healthy controls (HCs) (n = 19)...
February 27, 2018: Journal of Affective Disorders
Pascal Fleurkens, Agnes van Minnen, Eni S Becker, Iris van Oostrom, Anne Speckens, Mike Rinck, Janna N Vrijsen
Depression risk genes in combination with childhood events have been associated with biased processing as an intermediate phenotype for depression. The aim of the present conceptual replication study was to investigate the role of biased automatic approach-avoidance tendencies as a candidate intermediate phenotype for depression, in the context of genes (5-HTTLPR polymorphism) and childhood trauma. A naturalistic remitted depressed patients sample (N = 209) performed an Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT) with facial expressions (angry, sad, happy and neutral)...
2018: PloS One
Margaret Addabbo, Elena Longhi, Ioana Cristina Marchis, Paolo Tagliabue, Chiara Turati
The ability to discriminate between different facial expressions is fundamental since the first stages of postnatal life. The aim of this study is to investigate whether 2-days-old newborns are capable to discriminate facial expressions of emotions as they naturally take place in everyday interactions, that is in motion. When two dynamic displays depicting a happy and a disgusted facial expression were simultaneously presented (i.e., visual preference paradigm), newborns did not manifest any visual preference (Experiment 1)...
2018: PloS One
Nausheen Bakht
The social contract between medicine and society is being renegotiated and demands the reorientation of healthcare. Neither society nor doctors are happy with the way modern medicine is being practised. An obtuse focus on medical sciences and a myopic view of medical humanities (MH) has been incriminated. MH reflects on healthcare-related topics in the light of shared human experiences. It addresses the genuine concerns of patients and their attendants. It also helps inculcate humanistic values in doctors by enhancing ethical understanding, cultural sensitivity, mutual respect, empathy, communication skills and decision-making...
March 2018: JPMA. the Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association
Melissa Zajdel, Vicki S Helgeson, Howard J Seltman, Mary T Korytkowski, Leslie R M Hausmann
Background: Adjusting to the challenges of a chronic illness does not affect patients alone but also influences social network members-most notably spouses. One interpersonal framework of coping with a chronic illness is communal coping, described as when a problem is appraised as joint and the couple collaborates to manage the problem. Purpose: We sought to determine whether daily communal coping was linked to daily mood and self-care behavior and examined one potential mechanism that may explain these links: perceived emotional responsiveness...
February 17, 2018: Annals of Behavioral Medicine: a Publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine
Katie L Burkhouse, Autumn Kujawa, Bobby Hosseini, Heide Klumpp, Kate D Fitzgerald, Scott A Langenecker, Christopher S Monk, K Luan Phan
BACKGROUND: Research suggests that individuals with anxiety have difficulty ignoring threat distractors when completing tasks with competing stimuli. Studies examining the neural correlates of these emotional processing difficulties in youth anxiety highlight reduced recruitment of regions associated with goal-directed attention, such as the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). In the current study, we examined neural activation during an emotional conflict task in youth with anxiety disorders before and after treatment...
March 10, 2018: Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry
Venkataramana Kandi, Parimala Reddy Basireddy
Introduction Medical education involves training necessary to become a physician or a surgeon. This includes various levels of training like undergraduate, internship, and postgraduate training. Medical education can be quite complex, since it involves training in pre-clinical subjects (anatomy, physiology, biochemistry), the para-clinical subjects (microbiology, pathology, pharmacology, and forensic medicine), and a discrete group of clinical subjects that include general medicine, surgery, obstetrics and gynaecology, ear, nose and throat specialization, paediatrics, cardiology, pulmonology, dermatology, ophthalmology, and orthopaedics, and many other clinical specializations and super specialities (cardio-thoracic surgery, neurosurgery, etc...
January 5, 2018: Curēus
Megan Horsley, Amiee Trauth, David S Cooper
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 8, 2018: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Youl-Ri Kim, Jin-Sup Eom, Jennie Leppanen, Monica Leslie, Janet Treasure
BACKGROUND: Bulimia nervosa (BN) is characterized by binge eating and emotional dysregulation including increased negative affectivity (anger, anxiety). The aim of this study was to examine the effect of oxytocin on attentional processes towards anger in patients with BN. METHOD: The study design consisted of a double-blind, placebo-controlled within-subject crossover, single dose experiment. Sixty-four women (31 patients with BN and 33 healthy comparisons) completed self-reported measures to evaluate emotional difficulties and were administered a single dose of intranasal oxytocin (40IU) or placebo followed by a visual probe detection task to examine attentional orienting to angry or happy faces...
March 3, 2018: Psychoneuroendocrinology
Jorien van Hoorn, Ethan M McCormick, Eva H Telzer
Adolescence is a time of increased social-affective sensitivity, which is often related to heightened health-risk behaviors. However, moderate levels of social sensitivity, relative to either low (social vacuum) or high levels (exceptionally attuned), may confer benefits as it facilitates effective navigation of the social world. The present fMRI study tested a curvilinear relationship between social sensitivity and adaptive decision-making. Participants (ages 12-16; N = 35) played the Social Analogue Risk Task (SART), which measures participants' willingness to knock on doors in order to earn points...
February 24, 2018: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
Jesse Robbins, Becca Franks, Marina A G von Keyserlingk
Many scientists studying animal welfare appear to hold a hedonistic concept of welfare -whereby welfare is ultimately reducible to an animal's subjective experience. The substantial advances in assessing animal's subjective experience have enabled us to take a step back to consider whether such indicators are all one needs to know if one is interested in the welfare of an individual. To investigate this claim, we randomly assigned participants (n = 502) to read one of four vignettes describing a hypothetical chimpanzee and asked them to make judgments about the animal's welfare...
2018: PloS One
R M Anthony, A L den Hertog, D van Soolingen
A low pH was assumed to be required for the activity of pyrazinoic acid (the active form of pyrazinamide) against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but recently activity has been demonstrated at neutral pH. Renewed interest in pyrazinamide has led to an increasing number of potential targets and the suspicion that pyrazinamide is a 'dirty drug'. However, it is our opinion that the recent demonstration that pyrazinoic acid is active against PanD provides an alternative explanation for the secret of pyrazinamide's unusual activity...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
Emma Ward-Griffin, Patrick Klaiber, Hanne K Collins, Rhea L Owens, Stanley Coren, Frances S Chen
Recently, many universities have implemented programmes in which therapy dogs and their handlers visit college campuses. Despite the immense popularity of therapy dog sessions, few randomized studies have empirically tested the efficacy of such programmes. The present study evaluates the efficacy of such a therapy dog programme in improving the well-being of university students. This research incorporates two components: (a) a pre/post within-subjects design, in which 246 participants completed a brief questionnaire immediately before and after a therapy dog session and (b) an experimental design with a delayed-treatment control group, in which all participants completed baseline measures and follow-up measures approximately 10 hr later...
March 12, 2018: Stress and Health: Journal of the International Society for the Investigation of Stress
Synthia Guimond, Shezal Padani, Olivia Lutz, Shaun Eack, Heidi Thermenos, Matcheri Keshavan
Schizophrenia (SZ) patients exhibit deficits in emotion regulation that affect their daily functioning. There is evidence that the prefrontal cortex plays an important role in emotion regulation. However, it remains unclear how this brain region is involved in emotion regulation deficits in SZ, and how such deficits impact performance on cognitively demanding tasks. We examined how happy and fearful emotional distractors impact performance on working memory (WM) tasks of varying difficulty (0-back, 2-back), and brain activity using fMRI...
March 2, 2018: Journal of Psychiatric Research
Aekyoung Kim, Sam J Maglio
Happiness can be conceptualized as a positive affective state or as a goal whose pursuit ironically pulls the pursuer away from achieving it (Mauss, Tamir, Anderson, & Savino in Emotion, 11(4), 807-815, 2011). But how do people think about time during this latter, never-ending pursuit of happiness? The present investigation asks how seeking happiness influences perceptions of time availability. Four studies demonstrated that trait-level happiness seeking (Study 1) as well as direct manipulation of happiness seeking (Studies 2, 3, and 4) consistently reveal the same pattern: reduced feelings of time availability while pursuing happiness...
March 9, 2018: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
Kate Adlington
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 9, 2018: BMJ: British Medical Journal
Peter Okokhere, Andres Colubri, Chukwuemeka Azubike, Christopher Iruolagbe, Omoregie Osazuwa, Shervin Tabrizi, Elizabeth Chin, Sara Asad, Ehi Ediale, Mojeed Rafiu, Donatus Adomeh, Ikponmwosa Odia, Rebecca Atafo, Chris Aire, Sylvanus Okogbenin, Meike Pahlman, Beate Becker-Ziaja, Danny Asogun, Terrence Fradet, Ben Fry, Stephen F Schaffner, Christian Happi, George Akpede, Stephan Günther, Pardis C Sabeti
BACKGROUND: Lassa fever is a viral haemorrhagic disease endemic to west Africa. No large-scale studies exist from Nigeria, where the Lassa virus (LASV) is most diverse. LASV diversity, coupled with host genetic and environmental factors, might cause differences in disease pathophysiology. Small-scale studies in Nigeria suggest that acute kidney injury is an important clinical feature and might be a determinant of survival. We aimed to establish the demographic, clinical, and laboratory factors associated with mortality in Nigerian patients with Lassa fever, and hypothesised that LASV was the direct cause of intrinsic renal damage for a subset of the patients with Lassa fever...
March 6, 2018: Lancet Infectious Diseases
Rachel C Leung, Elizabeth W Pang, Evdokia Anagnostou, Margot J Taylor
Social cognition is impaired in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The ability to perceive and interpret affect is integral to successful social functioning and has an extended developmental course. However, the neural mechanisms underlying emotional face processing in ASD are unclear. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), the present study explored neural activation during implicit emotional face processing in young adults with and without ASD. Twenty-six young adults with ASD and 26 healthy controls were recruited...
2018: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Denise A Chu, Richard A Bryant, Justine M Gatt, Anthony Wf Harris
OBJECTIVE: Posttraumatic stress disorder and childhood trauma frequently co-occur. Both are associated with abnormal neural responses to salient emotion stimuli. As childhood trauma is a risk factor for posttraumatic stress disorder, differentiating between their neurophysiological effects is necessary to elucidate the neural pathways by which childhood trauma exposure contributes to increased posttraumatic stress disorder risks. METHODS: Face-specific N170 evoked response potentials for backward-masked (non-conscious) and conscious threat (fear, angry) and non-threat (happy) faces were measured in 77 adults (18-64 years old, 64% women, 78% right-handed) symptomatic for posttraumatic stress disorder...
March 1, 2018: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Munirah Bangee, Pamela Qualter
Prior research has shown that loneliness is associated with hypervigilance to social threats, with eye-tracking research showing lonely people display a specific attentional bias when viewing social rejection and social exclusion video footage (Bangee, Harris, Bridges, Rotenberg & Qualter, 2014; Qualter, Rotenberg, Barrett et al., 2013). The current study uses eye-tracker methodology to examine whether that attentional bias extends to negative emotional faces and negative social non-rejecting stimuli, or whether it could be explained only as a specific bias to social rejection/exclusion...
March 8, 2018: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology
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