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Wenzao Li, Peng Zhou, Congmin Zhao, Yuping Zhang
Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a multisystem genetic syndrome, often affects the central nervous system. The age of onset of TSC ranges from 0 to 15 years. The clinical features manifest as a combination of seizures, mental retardation, facial angiofibroma, renal angiomyolipoma, and cardiac rhabdomyoma. Most cases of TSC are caused by mutations of the TSC1 or TSC2 genes. We characterized a Chinese patient with a novel de novo mutation in the TSC2 gene associated with the TSC detected by next-generation sequencing...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Neurogenetics
Siying Ren, Yongfeng Luo, Hui Chen, David Warburton, Hilaire C Lam, Larry Wang, Ping Chen, Elizabeth P Henske, Wei Shi
The tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) proteins are critical negative regulators of the mTORC1 pathway. Germline mutations of TSC1 or TSC2 cause TSC, affecting multiple organs, including the kidney and lung, and causing substantial morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms of organ-specific disease in TSC remain incompletely understood, and the impact of TSC inactivation on mesenchymal lineage cells has not been specifically studied. We deleted Tsc2 specifically in mesoderm-derived mesenchymal cells of multiple organs in mice using the Dermo1-Cre driver...
October 18, 2016: American Journal of Pathology
Darius Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Afshin Saffari, Lara Wahlster, Alessia Di Nardo, Daria Turner, Tommy L Lewis, Christopher Conrad, Jonathan M Rothberg, Jonathan O Lipton, Stefan Kölker, Georg F Hoffmann, Min-Joon Han, Franck Polleux, Mustafa Sahin
Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a neurodevelopmental disease caused by TSC1 or TSC2 mutations and subsequent activation of the mTORC1 kinase. Upon mTORC1 activation, anabolic metabolism, which requires mitochondria, is induced, yet at the same time the principal pathway for mitochondrial turnover, autophagy, is compromised. How mTORC1 activation impacts mitochondrial turnover in neurons remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate impaired mitochondrial homeostasis in neuronal in vitro and in vivo models of TSC...
October 18, 2016: Cell Reports
Piotr T Filipczak, Cynthia L Thomas, Wenshu Chen, Andrew Salzman, Jacob D McDonald, Yong Lin, Steven A Belinsky
Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic multi-organ disorder characterized by the development of neoplastic lesions in kidney, lung, brain, heart and skin. It is caused by an inactivating mutation in tumor suppressor genes coding the TSC1/TSC2 complex, resulting in hyperactivation of mTOR- and Raf/MEK/MAPK-dependent signaling that stimulates tumor cell proliferation and metastasis. Despite its oncogenic effect, cells with TSC deficiency were more sensitive to oxidative stress and dependent on mitochondrial metabolism, providing a rationale for a new therapeutic approach...
October 18, 2016: Cancer Research
Barbara Kathage, Sebastian Gehlert, Anna Ulbricht, Laura Lüdecke, Victor E Tapia, Zacharias Orfanos, Daniela Wenzel, Wilhelm Bloch, Rudolf Volkmer, Bernd K Fleischmann, Dieter O Fürst, Jörg Höhfeld
The cochaperone BAG3 is a central protein homeostasis factor in mechanically strained mammalian cells. It mediates the degradation of unfolded and damaged forms of the actin-crosslinker filamin through chaperone-assisted selective autophagy (CASA). In addition, BAG3 stimulates filamin transcription in order to compensate autophagic disposal and to maintain the actin cytoskeleton under strain. Here we demonstrate that BAG3 coordinates protein synthesis and autophagy through spatial regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)...
October 15, 2016: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
Li Ding, Yue Yin, Lingling Han, Yin Li, Jing Zhao, Weizhen Zhang
Neurogenin3-driven deletion of tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (Tsc1) activated mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) measured by up-regulation of mTOR and S6 phosphorylation in islet cells. Neurogenin3-Tsc1-/- mice demonstrated a significant increase in average islet size and mean area of individual islet cell. Insulin mRNA and plasma insulin levels increased significantly after weaning. Glucagon mRNA and plasma levels increased in neonate followed by modest reduction in adult. Somatostatin mRNA and plasma levels markedly increased...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Endocrinology
Samara L Potter, Rajkumar Venkatramani, Scott Wenderfer, Brett H Graham, Sanjeev A Vasudevan, Andrew Sher, Hao Wu, David A Wheeler, Yaping Yang, Christine M Eng, Richard A Gibbs, Angshumoy Roy, Sharon E Plon, D Williams Parsons
Pediatric renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a rare cancer that can be associated with inherited diseases including tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) caused by germline mutations in TSC1 or TSC2. Somatic mutations in TSC1 and TSC2 have also been reported in adult RCC, which predict response to mTOR inhibitors. Here, we present the first case of RCC in a child with methylmalonic acidemia (MMA). Clinical whole exome sequencing of blood and tumor samples confirmed the diagnosis of MMA and revealed two somatic inactivating mutations in TSC2, suggesting the potential consideration of an mTOR inhibitor in the event of tumor recurrence...
October 17, 2016: Pediatric Blood & Cancer
Lijun Fang, Huaijun Tu, Wei Guo, Shixuan Wang, Ting Xue, Fei Yang, Xiaoyan Zhang, Yazhi Yang, Qian Wan, Zhexin Shi, Xulong Zhan, Jian Li
The TSC1/2 heterodimer, a key upstream regulator of the mTOR, can inhibit the activation of mTOR, which plays a critical role in immune responses after bacterial infections. Monocytes are an innate immune cell type that have been shown to be involved in bacteremia. However, how the mTOR pathway is involved in the regulation of monocytes is largely unknown. In our study, TSC1 KO mice and WT mice were infected with E. coli. When compared to WT mice, we found higher mortality, greater numbers of bacteria, decreased expression of coactivators in monocytes, increased numbers of Tregs, and decreased numbers of effector T cells in TSC1 KO mice...
2016: Mediators of Inflammation
Xi Fang, Matthew J Stroud, Kunfu Ouyang, Li Fang, Jianlin Zhang, Nancy D Dalton, Yusu Gu, Tongbin Wu, Kirk L Peterson, Hsien-Da Huang, Ju Chen, Nanping Wang
Adipose tissue is a key endocrine organ that governs systemic homeostasis. PPARγ is a master regulator of adipose tissue signaling that plays an essential role in insulin sensitivity, making it an important therapeutic target. The selective PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone (RSG) has been used to treat diabetes. However, adverse cardiovascular effects have seriously hindered its clinical application. Experimental models have revealed that PPARγ activation increases cardiac hypertrophy. RSG stimulates cardiac hypertrophy and oxidative stress in cardiomyocyte-specific PPARγ knockout mice, implying that RSG might stimulate cardiac hypertrophy independently of cardiomyocyte PPARγ...
October 6, 2016: JCI Insight
Ying-Bei Chen, Jianing Xu, Anders Jacobsen Skanderup, Yiyu Dong, A Rose Brannon, Lu Wang, Helen H Won, Patricia I Wang, Gouri J Nanjangud, Achim A Jungbluth, Wei Li, Virginia Ojeda, A Ari Hakimi, Martin H Voss, Nikolaus Schultz, Robert J Motzer, Paul Russo, Emily H Cheng, Filippo G Giancotti, William Lee, Michael F Berger, Satish K Tickoo, Victor E Reuter, James J Hsieh
Renal cell carcinomas with unclassified histology (uRCC) constitute a significant portion of aggressive non-clear cell renal cell carcinomas that have no standard therapy. The oncogenic drivers in these tumours are unknown. Here we perform a molecular analysis of 62 high-grade primary uRCC, incorporating targeted cancer gene sequencing, RNA sequencing, single-nucleotide polymorphism array, fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and cell-based assays. We identify recurrent somatic mutations in 29 genes, including NF2 (18%), SETD2 (18%), BAP1 (13%), KMT2C (10%) and MTOR (8%)...
October 7, 2016: Nature Communications
Takuma Tsuzuki Wada, Kojiro Sato, Toshihide Mimura
We encountered a case of a middle-aged woman with systemic lupus erythematosus. As the patient had progressive peripheral neuropathy including foot drop, we intended to treat her with intensive immunosuppressive therapy as soon as possible. Pretreatment assessment, however, revealed multiple nodular lesions in the lungs and bones, suggesting disseminated tumor metastasis or miliary tuberculosis. To our surprise, gallium and bone scintigraphy as well as cytodiagnosis revealed no sign of malignancy or infection, leading us to suspect the presence of another multisystem disorder...
March 2016: Eur J Rheumatol
Florentina Joyce Freiberg, Erdmute Kunstmann, Thomas König, Juliane Matlach, Daniel Kampik
Background: To present a case of conjunctival lymphangioma in a 4-year-old girl with tuberous sclerosis complex. Methods/results: A 4-year-old girl presented with a relapsing cystic lesion of the bulbar conjunctiva in the right eye with string-of-pearl-like dilation of lymphatic vessels and right-sided facial swelling with mild pain. Best-corrected vision was not impaired. Examination of the skin revealed three hypomelanotic macules and a lumbal Shagreen patch. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings displayed minimal enhancement of buccal fat on the right side...
2016: GMS Ophthalmol Cases
Samy L Habib, Noor Y Al-Obaidi, Maciej Nowacki, Katarzyna Pietkun, Barbara Zegarska, Tomasz Kloskowski, Wojciech Zegarski, Tomasz Drewa, Edward A Medina, Zhenze Zhao, Sitai Liang
Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant and multi-system genetic disorder in humans. TSC affects around 25,000 to 40,000 individuals in the United States and about 1 to 2 million individuals worldwide, with an estimated prevalence of one in 6,000 newborns. TSC occurs in all races and ethnic groups, and in both genders. TSC is caused by defects or mutations in two genes, TSC1 and TSC2. Loss of TSC1/TSC2 leads to dysregulation of mTOR, resulting in aberrant cell differentiation and development, and abnormal enlargement of cells...
2016: Journal of Cancer
Sanjay Konakondla, Mayur Jayarao, Jami Skrade, Caterina Giannini, Michael J Workman, Chad J Morgan
INTRODUCTION: The well-described entity of Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma (SEGA) in the setting of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) is profound in current literature. It has been described in children as well as adults with or without identifiable clinical presentations of tuberous sclerosis. To our knowledge there has not been any report of a negative genetic workup of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex in an adult patient presenting with an isolated SEGA. CASE REPORT: We present a case of a 25-year-old female with no medical history who presented to the emergency room for headaches...
November 2016: Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery
Suraj Peri, Elena Caretti, Rossella Tricarico, Karthik Devarajan, Mitchell Cheung, Eleonora Sementino, Craig W Menges, Emmanuelle Nicolas, Lisa A Vanderveer, Sharon Howard, Peggy Conrad, James A Crowell, Kerry S Campbell, Eric A Ross, Andrew K Godwin, Anthony T Yeung, Margie L Clapper, Robert G Uzzo, Elizabeth P Henske, Christopher J Ricketts, Cathy D Vocke, W Marston Linehan, Joseph R Testa, Alfonso Bellacosa, Levy Kopelovich, Alfred G Knudson
Tumor suppressor genes and their effector pathways have been identified for many dominantly heritable cancers, enabling efforts to intervene early in the course of disease. Our approach on the subject of early intervention was to investigate gene expression patterns of morphologically normal "one-hit" cells before they become hemizygous or homozygous for the inherited mutant gene which is usually required for tumor formation. Here, we studied histologically non-transformed renal epithelial cells from patients with inherited disorders that predispose to renal tumors, including von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease and Tuberous Sclerosis (TSC)...
September 22, 2016: Oncotarget
Joanna Trelinska, Wojciech Fendler, Iwona Dachowska, Katarzyna Kotulska, Sergiusz Jozwiak, Karolina Antosik, Piotr Gnys, Maciej Borowiec, Wojciech Mlynarski
BACKGROUND: Tuberous sclerosis (TSC) is a monogenic disease resulting from defects of the TSC1 or TSC2 genes, which encode the proteins forming hamartin-tuberin tumor suppressor complex, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTOR). The mTOR pathway is constitutively activated in response to tuberin or hamartin defects. The mTOR pathway is also regulated by a multitude of epigenetic mechanisms, one of which is regulation by microRNA (miRNA) inhibition. This leads us to hypothesize that organ-level abnormalities of miRNA expression patterns are widespread in TSC...
September 29, 2016: Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
Stephen M Bonsib, Christie Boils, Neriman Gokden, David Grignon, Xin Gu, John P T Higgins, Xavier Leroy, Jesse K McKenney, Samih H Nasr, Carrie Phillips, Ankur R Sangoi, Jon Wilson, Ping L Zhang
Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) results from mutation of TSC1 or TSC2 that encode for hamartin and tuberin. It affects the kidneys often in advance of extra-renal stigmata. We studied 14 TSC cases, and 4 possible TSC cases with multiple angiomyolipomas (AMLs) for hamartin and tuberin protein expression to determine if the staining profile could predict mutation status or likelihood of TSC with renal-limited disease. The 18 cases included 15 nephrectomies and 1 section of 6 TSC-associated renal cell carcinomas (RCC)...
April 30, 2016: Pathology, Research and Practice
Kalpana Kumari, Mehar C Sharma, Aanchal Kakkar, Prit B Malgulwar, Pankaj Pathak, Vaishali Suri, Chitra Sarkar, Sarat P Chandra, Mohammed Faruq, Rakesh K Gupta, Ravindra K Saran
BACKGROUND: Subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGA) are slow-growing benign intraventricular tumors, the pathogenesis of which is debated. Recent studies have shown that tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 1 and TSC2 genes are linked to the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) cell signaling pathway. We aimed to analyze TSC1 and TSC2 gene mutation, hamartin and tuberin protein expression, and protein expression of mTOR signaling cascade in a series of SEGA to determine their role in pathogenesis...
September 2016: Neurology India
Mélissa Carbonneau, Laurence M Gagné, Marie-Eve Lalonde, Marie-Anne Germain, Alena Motorina, Marie-Christine Guiot, Blandine Secco, Emma E Vincent, Anthony Tumber, Laura Hulea, Jonathan Bergeman, Udo Oppermann, Russell G Jones, Mathieu Laplante, Ivan Topisirovic, Kevin Petrecca, Marc-Étienne Huot, Frédérick A Mallette
The identification of cancer-associated mutations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes isocitrate dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) highlights the prevailing notion that aberrant metabolic function can contribute to carcinogenesis. IDH1/2 normally catalyse the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate into α-ketoglutarate (αKG). In gliomas and acute myeloid leukaemias, IDH1/2 mutations confer gain-of-function leading to production of the oncometabolite R-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) from αKG. Here we show that generation of 2HG by mutated IDH1/2 leads to the activation of mTOR by inhibiting KDM4A, an αKG-dependent enzyme of the Jumonji family of lysine demethylases...
2016: Nature Communications
Vipulkumar Dadhania, Miao Zhang, Li Zhang, Jolanta Bondaruk, Tadeusz Majewski, Arlene Siefker-Radtke, Charles C Guo, Colin Dinney, David E Cogdell, Shizhen Zhang, Sangkyou Lee, June G Lee, John N Weinstein, Keith Baggerly, David McConkey, Bogdan Czerniak
BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that bladder cancer can be divided into two molecular subtypes referred to as luminal and basal with distinct clinical behaviors and sensitivities to chemotherapy. We aimed to validate these subtypes in several clinical cohorts and identify signature immunohistochemical markers that would permit simple and cost-effective classification of the disease in primary care centers. METHODS: We analyzed genomic expression profiles of bladder cancer in three cohorts of fresh frozen tumor samples: MD Anderson (n=132), Lund (n=308), and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (n=408) to validate the expression signatures of luminal and basal subtypes and relate them to clinical follow-up data...
October 2016: EBioMedicine
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