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Dissociative Symptoms

Stephanie Cosentino, Carolyn Zhu, Elodie Bertrand, Janet Metcalfe, Sarah Janicki, Sarah Cines
Disordered awareness of memory loss (i.e., anosognosia) is a frequent and clinically relevant symptom of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The metacognitive errors which characterize anosognosia in AD, however, have not been fully articulated. The current study examined metamemory performance as a function of clinically defined awareness groups using different task conditions to examine the extent to which specific metacognitive deficits (i.e., detecting, integrating, or being explicitly aware of errors) contribute to anosognosia in AD (n = 49)...
August 13, 2016: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
Soumen Bera, Sanjay Lamba, Mubasher Rashid, Anuj K Sharma, Alexander B Medvinsky, Claudia Acquisti, Amit Chakraborty, Bai-Lian Li
Impaired glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) sensitivity to its inhibitors causes excessive insulin secretion by pancreatic beta-cells and defective ammonia metabolism in the liver. These symptoms are commonly associated with hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome (HI/HA), which causes recurrent hypoglycaemia in early infancy. Hepatic localization of GDH amination and deamination activities linked with the urea cycle is known to be involved in ammonia metabolism and detoxification. Although deamination activities of hepatic GDH in the periportal zones of liver lobules and its connection to the urea cycle have been exhaustively investigated, physiological roles of GDH amination activity observed at pericentral zones have often been overlooked...
October 17, 2016: Integrative Biology: Quantitative Biosciences From Nano to Macro
Julian D Ford, Andres R Schneeberger, Irina Komarovskaya, Kristina Muenzenmaier, Dorothy Castille, Lewis A Opler, Bruce Link
A new clinician rating measure, the Symptoms of Trauma Scale (SOTS) was administered to adult psychiatric outpatients (46 men, 47 women) with severe mental illness (SMI) who reported a history of trauma exposure and were recently discharged from inpatient psychiatric treatment. SOTS composite severity scores for DSM-IV and DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), complex PTSD (cPTSD), and total PTSD/cPTSD severity had acceptable internal consistency reliability. SOTS scores' construct and convergent validity was supported by correlations with self-report measures of childhood and adult trauma history, and PTSD, dissociation, and anger symptoms...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Trauma & Dissociation
Sara de la Salle, Joelle Choueiry, Dhrasti Shah, Hayley Bowers, Judy McIntosh, Vadim Ilivitsky, Verner Knott
N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists administered to healthy humans results in schizophrenia-like symptoms, which preclinical research suggests are due to glutamatergically altered brain oscillations. Here, we examined resting-state electroencephalographic activity in 21 healthy volunteers assessed in a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized study involving administration of either a saline infusion or a sub-anesthetic dose of ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist. Frequency-specific current source density (CSD) was assessed at sensor-level and source-level using eLORETA within regions of interest of a triple network model of schizophrenia (this model posits a dysfunctional switching between large-scale Default Mode and Central Executive networks by the monitor-controlling Salience Network)...
2016: Frontiers in Pharmacology
Sanford Nidich, Tom O'connor, Thomas Rutledge, Jeff Duncan, Blaze Compton, Angela Seng, Randi Nidich
CONTEXT: Trauma events are four times more prevalent in inmates than in the general public and are associated with increased recidivism and other mental and physical health issues. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of Transcendental Meditation(a) (TM) on trauma symptoms in male inmates. DESIGN: One hundred eighty-one inmates with a moderate- to high-risk criminal profile were randomly assigned to either the TM program or to a usual care control group...
October 7, 2016: Permanente Journal
A Shohet, A Khlebtovsky, N Roizen, Y Roditi, R Djaldetti
BACKGROUND: Cannabis can alleviate pain of various etiologies. This study assessed the effect of cannabis on motor symptoms and pain parameters in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: Twenty patients with PD who were licensed to use cannabis underwent evaluation before and 30 min after cannabis consumption and again after long-term use. Motor function was assessed with the Unified PD Rating scale (UPDRS) by two raters, one blinded. Pain was assessed with the Pain Rating Index (PRI) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) of the short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire...
October 10, 2016: European Journal of Pain: EJP
R J Brown
Dissociation has been cited as a possible psychologic mechanism underpinning functional neurologic disorders (FND) since the 19th century. Since that time, changes in psychiatric classification have created confusion about what the term dissociation actually means. The available evidence suggests that it now refers to at least two qualitatively distinct types of phenomena: detachment (an altered state of consciousness characterized by a sense of separation from the self or world) and compartmentalization (a reversible loss of voluntary control over apparently intact processes and functions), as well as their underlying mechanisms...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
Q Deeley
Suggestion in hypnosis has been applied to the treatment of functional neurologic symptoms since the earliest descriptions of hypnosis in the 19th century. Suggestion in this sense refers to an intentional communication of beliefs or ideas, whether verbally or nonverbally, to produce subjectively convincing changes in experience and behavior. The recognition of suggestion as a psychologic process with therapeutic applications was closely linked to the derivation of hypnosis from earlier healing practices. Animal magnetism, the immediate precursor of hypnosis, arrived at a psychologic concept of suggestion along with other ideas and practices which were then incorporated into hypnosis...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
J Stone, A Carson, M Hallett
There is widespread agreement that the way health professionals communicate the diagnosis of functional neurologic disorders (FND) has a central role in treatment, as it does arguably for most conditions. In this chapter we discuss barriers to effective diagnosis, different models of explanation and evidence regarding the importance of effective communication of the diagnosis in FND, especially movement disorders, and dissociative (nonepileptic) seizures. Debates and disagreements about how to go about this task often reflect different theoretic models held by health professionals rather than evidence...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
J Gelauff, J Stone
The prognosis of functional (psychogenic) neurologic disorders is important in being able to help answer patients' and carers' questions, determine whether treatment is worthwhile, and to find out which factors predict outcome. We reviewed data on prognosis of functional neurologic disorders from two systematic reviews on functional motor disorders and dissociative (nonepileptic) seizures as well as additional studies on functional visual and sensory symptoms. Methodologic problems include heterogeneity in studied samples and outcome measures, diagnostic suspicion and referral bias, small size and retrospective design of available studies, possible treatments during follow-up, and literature review bias...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
M Reuber, G H Rawlings
Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) superficially resemble epileptic seizures or syncope and most patients with PNES are initially misdiagnosed as having one of the latter two types of transient loss of consciousness. However, evidence suggests that the subjective seizure experience of PNES and its main differential diagnoses are as different as the causes of these three disorders. In spite of this, and regardless of the fact that PNES are considered a mental disorder in the current nosologies, research has only given limited attention to the subjective symptomatology of PNES...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
J Stone, S Aybek
Functional (psychogenic) limb weakness describes genuinely experienced limb power or paralysis in the absence of neurologic disease. The hallmark of functional limb weakness is the presence of internal inconsistency revealing a pattern of symptoms governed by abnormally focused attention. In this chapter we review the history and epidemiology of this clinical presentation as well as its subjective experience highlighting the detailed descriptions of authors at the end of the 19th and early 20th century. We discuss the relevance that physiological triggers such as injury and migraine and psychophysiological events such as panic and dissociation have to understanding of mechanism and treatment...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
A Carson, L Ludwig, K Welch
In this chapter we review key psychologic theories that have been mooted as possible explanations for the etiology of functional neurologic symptoms, conversion disorder, and hysteria. We cover Freudian psychoanalysis and later object relations and attachment theories, social theories, illness behavior, classic and operant conditioning, social learning theory, self-regulation theory, cognitive-behavioral theories, and mindfulness. Dissociation and modern cognitive neuroscience theories are covered in other chapters in this series and, although of central importance, are omitted from this chapter...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
Dorina Winter
Interactions between attention and processing of emotional stimuli shed light on both sensitivity to emotional stimuli as well as emotion dysregulation. Both of the latter processes have been proposed as central characteristics of altered emotion processing in those with borderline personality disorder (BPD). This review first summarizes the conflicting behavioural, psychophysiological and neuroimaging evidence for the hypothesis that emotional dysregulation should be reflected by higher distractibility through emotional stimuli in those with BPD...
2016: Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation
Lütfullah Beşiroğlu
Cognitive-behavioral therapies (CBT), antidepressants and neuromodulation techniques are current treatment options used in various stages of treatment procedure for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The factors that disparate treatment options from psychological approaches to invasive surgical techniques in a psychiatric disorder have in common have scarcely been described in the relevant literature. Cognitive neuropsychological model (CNM) as a novel approach offers a common framework in which psychological and neurobiological models of different psychopathologies are reconciled by means of impaired emotional processing...
2016: Türk Psikiyatri Dergisi, Turkish Journal of Psychiatry
Adam D LaMotte, Christopher M Murphy
Objective: Research with partner-violent men has found that a subset of this population reports dissociative experiences during their violence (e.g., inability to remember violence [despite admission that it had occurred]; flashbacks during violence). However, the literature examining this phenomenon has been primarily limited to clinical observations and case studies, and there is a need for more thorough empirical investigation regarding the prevalence and correlates of dissociative violence among individuals in intimate partner violence (IPV) intervention programs...
October 6, 2016: Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice and Policy
Reggie Taylor, Jean Théberge, Peter C Williamson, Maria Densmore, Richard W J Neufeld
Functional magnetic resonance imaging at 7.0 Tesla was undertaken among Schizophrenia participants (Sz), and clinical (major mood disorder; MDD) and healthy controls (HC), during performance of the Stoop task. Stroop conditions included congruent and incongruent word color items, color-only items, and word-only items. Previous modeling results extended to this most widely used selective-attention task. All groups executed item-encoding operations (subprocesses of the item encoding process) at the same rate (performance accuracy being similarly high throughout), thus displaying like processing capacity; Sz participants, however, employed more subprocesses for item completions than did the MDD participants, who in turn used more subprocesses than the HC group...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Yael Lahav, Ask Elklit
Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is an extreme traumatic event associated with numerous long lasting difficulties and symptoms (e.g., Herman, 1992). These include, among other things, the impediment of basic interpersonal structures of attachment (Rumstein-McKean & Hunsley, 2001), as well as impairment of mental integration manifested in dissociation (Van Den Bosch et al., 2003). Theoretically, attachment insecurities and dissociation are closely linked, since dissociation is generated as a way to resolve the conflicted attachment demands faced by the abused child (e...
September 28, 2016: Child Abuse & Neglect
Brianna E Pollock, Jenny Macfie, L Christian Elledge
We report on the treatment and successful outcome of a 58-year-old Native-American male with a history of complex trauma presenting with dissociative-identity disorder (DID) and major depressive disorder. The treatment included a trauma-informed phase-based psychotherapy as recommended by the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation (ISSTD) for treating DID. We assessed symptoms at baseline and at three additional time points over the course of 14 months. We utilized Reliable Change Index to examine statistically significant change in symptoms over the course of treatment...
September 30, 2016: Journal of Trauma & Dissociation
Andrew Chu, Sameer Shaharyar, Binna Chokshi, Nikhil Bhardwaj
Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare infiltrative lung disease characterized by deposition of spherical calcium phosphate microliths called calcospherites within the alveoli. PAM was first described by Friedrich in 1856 and then by Harbitz in 1918. The disease pathogenesis is based on mutations in the SLC34A2 gene that encodes for the Type IIb sodium-phosphate cotransporter. The majority of the patients are diagnosed at an early age, usually between the ages of 20 and 40 years. The hallmark of this disease is a striking dissociation between the radiological findings and the mild clinical symptoms...
August 24, 2016: Curēus
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