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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28104882/blind-climber
#1
Sacha Vignieri
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 20, 2017: Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28101826/sagittal-band-boutonniere-and-pulley-injuries-in-the-athlete
#2
REVIEW
Louis Christopher Grandizio, Joel Christian Klena
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: While hand injuries occur frequently in the athletic population, sagittal band ruptures, boutonniere deformities, and pulley ruptures are infrequently encountered. These injuries represent diagnostic challenges and can result in significant impairment. Early recognition with appropriate treatment is necessary to maximize recovery and minimize return to athletic competition. This review will focus on the underlying mechanism, pathophysiology of injury, diagnosis, and treatment of each of these injuries...
January 18, 2017: Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28063720/a-case-of-cardiac-arrest-that-occurred-on-a-high-mountain-in-which-a-favorable-outcome-was-obtained
#3
Youichi Yanagawa, Kazuhiko Omori, Ikuto Takeuchi, Kei Jitsuiki, Toshihiko Yoshizawa, Kouhei Ishikawa, Yumi Kando, Mutsumu Fukata, Hiromichi Ohsaka
A 36-year-old man started to climb Mount Fuji (3776m above sea level: ASL), from the Gotemba new fifth station (2400m ASL). He had no significant medical history, and this was his first attempt to climb such a high mountain. He began feeling chest discomfort but continued to climb. When he reached the ninth station of the mountain (3600mASL), he lost consciousness. One individual immediately provided basic life support using an automated external defibrillator (AED) that was located in the station. After electroshocks, he regained consciousness...
October 24, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27998174/response-to-nature-fix-addiction-to-outdoor-activities-r-c-buckley-s-commentary-on-heirene-r-m-shearer-d-roderique-davies-g-mellalieu-s-d-2016-addiction-in-extreme-sports-an-exploration-of-withdrawal-states-in-rock-climbers-journal-of-behavioral-addictions
#4
Robert M Heirene, David Shearer, Stephen D Mellalieu, Gareth Roderique-Davies
Buckley's commentary on our study of rock climber's withdrawal experiences raises a number of important questions surrounding the concept of extreme or adventure sports addiction. Drawing on the few available investigations of this topic, we respond to Buckley's questions here, though emphasize the need for further studies of extreme sports addiction in order to provide more empirically informed answers.
December 2016: Journal of Behavioral Addictions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27998172/commentary-on-addiction-in-extreme-sports-an-exploration-of-withdrawal-states-in-rock-climbers
#5
Ralf C Buckley
Individuals can display characteristics of behavioral addictions to nature and the outdoors as well as adventure activities. Research on mental health effects of nature exposure is relevant to research on nature and adventure addictions.
December 2016: Journal of Behavioral Addictions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27991725/a-blind-climber-the-first-evidence-of-ultrasonic-echolocation-in-arboreal-mammals
#6
Aleksandra A Panyutina, Alexander N Kuznetsov, Ilya A Volodin, Alexey V Abramov, Irina B Soldatova
The means of orientation is studied in the Vietnamese pygmy dormouse Typhlomys chapensis, a poorly known enigmatic semi-fossorial semi-arboreal rodent. Data on eye structure are presented, which prove that Typhlomys (translated as "the blind mouse") is incapable of object vision - the retina is folded and retains no more than 2 500 ganglion cells in the focal plane, and the optic nerve is subject to gliosis. Hence, Typhlomys has no other means for rapid long-range orientation among tree branches other than echolocation...
December 19, 2016: Integrative Zoology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27929023/anthropology-lucy-was-a-climber
#7
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 7, 2016: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27900162/first-overview-on-chronic-injuries-in-sport-climbing-proposal-for-a-change-in-reporting-of-injuries-in-climbing
#8
Gudmund Grønhaug, Marius Norberg
BACKGROUND: Climbing as a youth sport is growing fast. This is mostly due to indoor walls for training attracting youngsters. With hard training from young ages it is vital to be able to pinpoint training regimes to avoid injuries in athletes. Furthermore, it is vital to know what injuries are most common in the sport to be able to prevent them. Such an overview on injuries does not exist to date. The aim of this overview is to summon the injuries described in published research and to extract the most common...
2016: BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27888361/morphological-and-structural-characterization-of-the-attachment-system-in-aerial-roots-of-syngonium-podophyllum
#9
Xiaojun Yang, Wenli Deng
The attachment of aerial roots of Syngonium podophyllum involves a multi-step process adjusted by multi-scale structures. Helical-crack root hairs are first found in the attachment system, representing specialized structures for surface anchorage. The morphological variability of attachment organs reflects diverse climbing strategies. One such anchoring mode in clinging-climbers involves the time-dependent interaction between roots and the support: By naturally occurring adhesive roots with root hairs, the plant can ascend on supports of any shape and size...
November 25, 2016: Planta
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886830/flexor-tendon-pulley-injuries-in-rock-climbers
#10
REVIEW
Elizabeth A King, John R Lien
Closed pulley ruptures are rare in the general population but occur more frequently in rock climbers due to biomechanical demands on the hand. Injuries present with pain and swelling over the affected pulley, and patients may feel or hear a pop at the time of injury. Sequential pulley ruptures are required for clinical bowstringing of the flexor tendons. Ultrasound confirms diagnosis of pulley rupture and evaluates degree of displacement of the flexor tendons. Isolated pulley ruptures frequently are treated conservatively with early functional rehabilitation...
February 2017: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27868457/the-hillary-climber-trumps-manual-testing-an-automatic-system-for-studying-drosophila-climbing
#11
Alex M Willenbrink, Margo K Gronauer, Leon F Toebben, Daniel R Kick, Madalyn Wells, Bing Zhang
Climbing or negative geotaxis is an innate behavior of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. There has been considerable interest in using this simple behavior to gain insights into the changes in brain function associated with aging, influence of drugs, mutated genes, and human neurological disorders. At present, most climbing tests are conducted manually and there is a lack of a simple and automatic device for repeatable and quantitative analysis of fly climbing behavior. Here we present an automatic fly climbing system, named the Hillary Climber (after Sir Edmund Hillary), that can replace the human manual tapping of vials with a mechanical tapping mechanism to provide more consistent force and reduce variability between the users and trials...
September 2016: Journal of Neurogenetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863457/the-effects-of-high-resistance-few-repetitions-and-low-resistance-high-repetitions-resistance-training-on-climbing-performance
#12
Espen Hermans, Vidar Andersen, Atle Hole Saeterbakken
The aim of the study was to compare the effects of different strength training intensities on climbing performance, climbing-specific tests and a general strength test. Thirty lower grade and intermediate-level climbers participated in a 10-week training programme. The participants were randomized into three groups: high resistance-few repetitions training groups (HR-FR), low resistance-high repetitions training groups (LR-HR) and a control group (CON) which continued climbing/training as usual. Post-testing results demonstrated statistical tendencies for climbing performance improvements in the HR-FR and LR-HR (p = 0...
November 18, 2016: European Journal of Sport Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27855704/feeding-preferences-of-the-asian-elephant-elephas-maximus-in-nepal
#13
Raj Kumar Koirala, David Raubenheimer, Achyut Aryal, Mitra Lal Pathak, Weihong Ji
BACKGROUND: Nepal provides habitat for approximately 100-125 wild Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Although a small proportion of the world population of this species, this group is important for maintaining the genetic diversity of elephants and conservation of biodiversity in this region. Knowledge of foraging patterns of these animals, which is important for understanding their habitat requirements and for assessing their habitat condition, is lacking for the main areas populated by elephants in Nepal...
November 17, 2016: BMC Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27793442/pulling-harder-than-the-hamate-tolerates-evaluation-of-hamate-injuries-in-rock-climbing-and-bouldering
#14
Christoph Lutter, Andreas Schweizer, Thomas Hochholzer, Thomas Bayer, Volker Schöffl
OBJECTIVE: Hamate hook fractures are rare injuries, comprising 2% to 4% of all carpal fractures. Climbing athletes seem to be affected more frequently than others, as they strain the passive and active anatomical structures of their hands and fingers to maximum capacity during training or competing. This stress is transmitted to the hook of the hamate by tightened flexor tendons, which creates high contact pressure to the ulnar margin of the carpal tunnel. Injuries of the hamate hook, caused by contact pressure of the anatomical structures, are rare and occur nearly exclusively during climbing...
December 2016: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27763796/medication-use-among-mount-everest-climbers-practice-and-attitudes
#15
Andrew M Luks, Colin Grissom, Luanne Freer, Peter Hackett
Luks, Andrew M., Colin Grissom, Luanne Freer, and Peter Hackett. Medication use among mount Everest climbers: practice and attitudes. High Alt Med Biol. 17:315-322, 2016.-The lay public, media, and medical experts have expressed concern about the ethics of climbers using medications to improve performance and increase the odds of summit success while climbing at high altitude, but the true incidence of this practice remains unclear. We conducted an anonymous survey of climbers who have attempted to climb Mt...
December 2016: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27761303/ecomorphological-analysis-of-the-astragalo-calcaneal-complex-in-rodents-and-inferences-of-locomotor-behaviours-in-extinct-rodent-species
#16
Samuel Ginot, Lionel Hautier, Laurent Marivaux, Monique Vianey-Liaud
Studies linking postcranial morphology with locomotion in mammals are common. However, such studies are mostly restricted to caviomorphs in rodents. We present here data from various families, belonging to the three main groups of rodents (Sciuroidea, Myodonta, and Ctenohystrica). The aim of this study is to define morphological indicators for the astragalus and calcaneus, which allow for inferences to be made about the locomotor behaviours in rodents. Several specimens were dissected and described to bridge the myology of the leg with the morphology of the bones of interest...
2016: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27747791/a-descriptive-study-of-hot-aches-a-previously-unreported-winter-climbing-phenomenon
#17
Andrew Melvin, Jacob George
BACKGROUND: Hot aches, also known as the screaming barfies in North America, are a recognised phenomenon amongst winter climbers, assumed to be triggered by the reperfusion of cold peripheries which then rapidly progresses to a systemic vasodilatory syndrome. Symptoms experienced in the hands include pain, numbness and throbbing followed by systemic symptoms such as nausea, irritability, dizziness and in extreme cases a transient loss of vision and hearing. Despite being well known amongst the winter climbing community, there are no publications in the scientific literature characterising the hot aches...
December 2016: Sports Medicine—Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27745528/the-physiological-effect-of-a-climb-assist-device-on-vertical-ladder-climbing
#18
Peter James Barron, Katherine Burgess, Kay Cooper, Arthur D Stewart
'Climb assist' claims to reduce strain when climbing ladders; however, no research has yet substantiated this. The purpose of this study was to assess the physiological and psychophysical effects of climb assist on 30 m ladder climbing at a minimum acceptable speed. Eight participants (six male and two female) climbed a 30 m ladder at 24 rungs per minute with and without climb assist, and were monitored for heart rate (HR), [Formula: see text]O2 and rate of perceived exertion (RPE). All three variables decreased significantly (p < 0...
October 15, 2016: Ergonomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27726752/imaging-the-injured-pediatric-athlete-upper-extremity
#19
Jorge Delgado, Diego Jaramillo, Nancy A Chauvin
Increased physical activity in childhood has resulted in a large number of sports-related injuries. Although there is overlap between the sports-related injuries seen in pediatric and adult patients, important differences exist in the injury patterns of pediatric patients. These differences are related to the continuous changes in the developing skeleton and its relationship with adjacent soft tissues. The imbalance in strength between the growing bones and the nearby tendons and ligaments makes the bones prone to acute and chronic injuries...
October 2016: Radiographics: a Review Publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27683676/spine-surgery-in-nepal-the-2015-earthquake
#20
REVIEW
Chester E Sutterlin
At noon on Saturday, 25 April 2015, a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal. It was centered in the Himalaya northwest of Kathmandu, the capital of over 1 million people. The violent tremors were felt as far away as New Delhi, India 1,000 km from the epicenter, but the worst of its destructive force was experienced in the heavily populated Kathmandu valley and in the remote mountainous villages of the Himalaya. Ancient temples crumbled; poorly constructed buildings collapsed; men, women, and children were trapped and injured, sometimes fatally...
December 2015: Journal of Spine Surgery (Hong Kong)
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