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cancer neurology

Henrieta Škovierová, Eva Vidomanová, Silvia Mahmood, Janka Sopková, Anna Drgová, Tatiana Červeňová, Erika Halašová, Ján Lehotský
Homocysteine (Hcy) is a sulfur-containing non-proteinogenic amino acid derived in methionine metabolism. The increased level of Hcy in plasma, hyperhomocysteinemia, is considered to be an independent risk factor for cardio and cerebrovascular diseases. However, it is still not clear if Hcy is a marker or a causative agent of diseases. More and more research data suggest that Hcy is an important indicator for overall health status. This review represents the current understanding of molecular mechanism of Hcy metabolism and its link to hyperhomocysteinemia-related pathologies in humans...
October 20, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Aleksandra Bocian, Małgorzata Urbanik, Konrad Hus, Andrzej Łyskowski, Vladimír Petrilla, Zuzana Andrejčáková, Monika Petrillová, Jaroslav Legath
Snake venom is a rich source of peptides and proteins with a wide range of actions. Many of the venom components are currently being tested for their usefulness in the treatment of many diseases ranging from neurological and cardiovascular to cancer. It is also important to constantly search for new proteins and peptides with properties not yet described. The venom of Vipera berus berus has hemolytic, proteolytic and cytotoxic properties, but its exact composition and the factors responsible for these properties are not known...
October 19, 2016: Molecules: a Journal of Synthetic Chemistry and Natural Product Chemistry
Neha, Amteshwar S Jaggi, Nirmal Singh
Silymarin is the active constituent of Silybum marianum (milk thistle) which is a C-25 containing flavonolignan. Milk thistle has a lot of traditional values, being used as a vegetable, as salad, as bitter tonic, and as galactogogue in nursing mothers and in various ailments such as liver complications, depression, dyspepsia, spleenic congestions, varicose veins, diabetes, amenorrhea, uterine hemorrhage, and menstrual problems. In this present chapter, a comprehensive attempt has been made to discuss the potential of silymarin in chronic disorders...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Mitra Hariri, Reza Ghiasvand
Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum and Cinnamon cassia), the eternal tree of tropical medicine, belongs to the Lauraceae family and is one of the most important spices used daily by people all over the world. It contains a lot of manganese, iron, dietary fiber, and calcium. Cinnamon contains derivatives, such as cinnamaldehyde, cinnamic acid, cinnamate, and numerous other components such as polyphenols and antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, antimicrobial, anticancer effects. Several reports have dealt with the numerous properties of cinnamon in the forms of bark, essential oils, bark powder, and phenolic compounds, and each of these properties can play a key role in human health...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Matthias Groh, Laura Oana Albulescu, Agnese Cristini, Natalia Gromak
R-loops comprise an RNA/DNA hybrid and displaced single-stranded DNA. They play crucial biological functions and are implicated in neurological diseases, including ataxias, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, nucleotide expansion disorders (Friedreich ataxia, Fragile X syndrome) and cancer. Currently it is unclear which mechanisms cause R-loops structures to become pathogenic. The RNA/DNA helicase Senataxin (SETX) is one of the best characterised R-loop-binding factors in vivo. Mutations in SETX are linked to two neurodegenerative disorders: ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 4 (ALS4)...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Molecular Biology
Giulia R Mosele, Gianfilippo Caggiari, Roberto M Scarpa, Carlo Doria
BACKGROUND: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is among the 10 most common cancers in both men and women. It comprises 2-3% of all malignancies. The most common site for metastasis from RCC is the lung (50% of patients), followed by the skeleton (20% to 50% of patients). METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed our consecutive series of 63 patients surgically treated for spinal metastases from RCC. The surgical treatment for spinal metastases varied in each patient. Factors influencing the choice of surgery included age, disease status, symptoms, morbidity of the patient, the location, the number of repetitive lesions and the existence of extra-osseous metastases...
October 21, 2016: Minerva Urologica e Nefrologica, the Italian Journal of Urology and Nephrology
K-W Nam, C K Kim, T J Kim, S J An, A M Demchuk, Y Kim, S Jung, M-K Han, S-B Ko, B-W Yoon
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The occurrence of stroke in cancer patients is caused by conventional vascular risk factors and cancer-specific mechanisms. However, cryptogenic stroke in patients with cancer was considered to be more related to cancer-specific hypercoagulability. In this study, we investigated the potential of the D-dimer level to serve as a predictor of early neurologic deterioration (END) in cryptogenic stroke patients with active cancer. METHODS: We recruited 109 cryptogenic stroke patients with active cancer within 72 h of symptom onset...
October 20, 2016: European Journal of Neurology: the Official Journal of the European Federation of Neurological Societies
Kostas Delaunay, Florence Le Jeune, Etienne Garin, Anne Devillers, Xavier Palard-Novello
A 75-year-old man with a history of prostate cancer was referred to our department to perform F-choline (FCH) PET/CT. FCH PET/CT showed a markedly increased uptake in the right temporoparietal junction brain. Three weeks earlier, acute ischemic stroke was diagnosed in the right temporoparietal junction brain on diffusion-weighted sequence and thrombosis in a distal branch of the right middle cerebral artery on MR angiography. Choline precursors promote repair and growth of cell membranes in neurologic diseases, so FCH PET/CT uptake could be explained by repair processes during early outcome of acute ischemic stroke...
October 18, 2016: Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Astrid Hagelkruys, Mirjam A Moser, Christian Seiser
Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play crucial roles during mammalian development and for cellular homeostasis. In addition, these enzymes are promising targets for small molecule inhibitors in the treatment of cancer and neurological diseases. Conditional HDAC knock-out mice are excellent tools for defining the functions of individual HDACs in vivo and for identifying the molecular targets of HDAC inhibitors in disease. Here, we describe the generation of tissue-specific HDAC knock-out mice and delineate a strategy for the generation of conditional HDAC knock-in mice...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
A A H Bressers, N A Goto, S Piepers, J C Regelink
BACKGROUND: Autoimmune encephalitis is a rare condition characterized by subacute development of cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. A paraneoplastic syndrome involves autoimmune encephalitis caused by classic antibodies. Although this condition is often associated with cancer, no malignancy has yet been found in 70-90% of patients at the time of diagnosis. CASE DESCRIPTION: We saw a 58-year-old male patient with fatigue, diarrhoea and weight loss. He was also experiencing hyperekplexia, personality changes and an instable gait...
2016: Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Geneeskunde
Angel R de Lera, A Ganesan
The modern drug discovery process has largely focused its attention in the so-called magic bullets, single chemical entities that exhibit high selectivity and potency for a particular target. This approach was based on the assumption that the deregulation of a protein was causally linked to a disease state, and the pharmacological intervention through inhibition of the deregulated target was able to restore normal cell function. However, the use of cocktails or multicomponent drugs to address several targets simultaneously is also popular to treat multifactorial diseases such as cancer and neurological disorders...
2016: Clinical Epigenetics
Silvia Gangemi, Edoardo Miozzi, Michele Teodoro, Giusi Briguglio, Annamaria De Luca, Carmela Alibrando, Irene Polito, Massimo Libra
It is well known that pesticides are widely used compounds. In fact, their use in agriculture, forestry, fishery and the food industry has granted a huge improvement in terms of productive efficiency. However, a great number of epidemiological surveys have demonstrated that these toxic compounds can interact and exert negative effects not only with their targets (pests, herbs and fungi), but also with the rest of the environment, including humans. This is particularly relevant in the case of workers involved in the production, transportation, preparation and application of these toxicants...
October 10, 2016: Molecular Medicine Reports
Nadia Gildeh, Panagis Drakatos, Sean Higgins, Ivana Rosenzweig, Brian D Kent
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) causes daytime fatigue and sleepiness, and has an established relationship with cardiovascular and metabolic disease. Recent years have seen the emergence of an evidence base linking OSA with an increased risk of degenerative neurological disease and associated cognitive impairment, an accelerated rate of decline in kidney function with an increased risk of clinically significant chronic kidney disease (CKD), and with a significantly higher rate of cancer incidence and death. This review evaluates the evidence base linking OSA with these seemingly unrelated co-morbidities, and explores potential mechanistic links underpinning their development in patients with OSA, including intermittent hypoxia (IH), sleep fragmentation, sympathetic excitation, and immune dysregulation...
September 2016: Journal of Thoracic Disease
Yik Weng Yew, Cerrene N Giordano, Graciela Spivak, Henry W Lim
Photodermatoses associated with defective DNA repair are a group of photosensitive hereditary skin disorders. In this review, we focus on diseases and syndromes with defective nucleotide excision repair that are not accompanied by an increased risk of cutaneous malignancies despite having photosensitivity. Specifically, the gene mutations and transcription defects, epidemiology, and clinical features of Cockayne syndrome, cerebro-oculo-facial-skeletal syndrome, ultraviolet-sensitive syndrome, and trichothiodystrophy will be discussed...
November 2016: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Hui-Chuan Huang, Chien-Hung Chang, Chaur-Jong Hu, Meei-Ling Shyu, Chin-I Chen, Chih-Shan Huang, Hsiu-Ting Tsai, Hsiu-Ju Chang
OBJECTIVE: To explore the temporal effects of psychological distress on the functional recovery among stroke survivors. DESIGN: A longitudinal follow-up study. All participants were interviewed at 5 days after stroke onset, and at 1, 2, 3, and 6 months after discharge from acute care hospitals. SETTING: Neurology inpatient and outpatient departments and rehabilitation clinics. PARTICIPANTS: First-time stroke participants (N=62) without cognitive impairment, psychiatric disorders, or cancer were recruited...
October 12, 2016: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Pierre R Bourque, Gabrielle Bourque, William Miller, John Woulfe, Jodi Warman Chardon
Perineural invasion is a targeted cellular proliferation guided by neurotrophins, rather than a simple diffusion of tumor in a path of least resistance. Invasion of cranial nerves by squamous cell carcinoma can represent an important diagnostic dilemma. It commonly presents as a distinct clinical neurological syndrome of combined isolated trigeminal and facial neuropathies. The focal cancer source may have been overlooked or remain occult. This case series illustrates diverse clinical presentations and neuroimaging challenges in four patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cranial nerves...
October 11, 2016: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience: Official Journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
Heather Marion Ames, Ming Yuan, Maria Adelita Vizcaíno, Wayne Yu, Fausto J Rodriguez
Low-grade (WHO I-II) gliomas and glioneuronal tumors represent the most frequent primary tumors of the central nervous system in children. They often have a good prognosis following total resection, however they can create many neurological complications due to mass effect, and may be difficult to resect depending on anatomic location. MicroRNAs have been identified as molecular regulators of protein expression/translation that can repress multiple mRNAs concurrently through base pairing, and have an important role in cancer, including brain tumors...
October 14, 2016: Modern Pathology: An Official Journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc
Preeti Vyas, Divya Vohora
Recent findings have publicized phosphoinositide-3-kinases (PI3Ks) as novel therapeutic targets, which are also purported to be involved in the complex pathophysiology of inflammatory and various other diseases. They are recognized to participate in the inflammatory cellular responses by modulating the growth, development and proliferation of various immune cells and hence, affect the release of various cytokines and other inflammatory mediators involved in these manifestations. The review presents a brief synopsis of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signalling pathway along with the current and future prospects of targeting PI3Ks for various diseases, like malignant, autoimmune, inflammatory, cardiovascular, neurological disorders etc...
October 13, 2016: Current Drug Targets
Christos Panayi, Nagui Antoun, Richard Sandford
A 44-year-old woman with a history of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease, a rare inherited neoplasia syndrome, presented acutely to hospital with a productive cough, symptoms of respiratory tract infection and odynophagia (painful swallowing). A chest X-ray confirmed right-sided pneumonia. Investigation of the persistent odynophagia using barium swallow revealed aspiration of the contrast into the lungs and suggested a neurological cause for her chest infection. Clinical assessment and speech and language therapy confirmed a pseudobulbar palsy...
October 13, 2016: BMJ Case Reports
Egle Ramelyte, Sabrina A Schindler, Reinhard Dummer
Introduction The introduction of immunotherapies into clinical practice has substantially improved the prognosis of metastatic melanoma patients as well as patients suffering from other cancers. The two FDA-approved checkpoint inhibitors against PD-1 (nivolumab and pembrolizumab) have been shown to significantly improve patient survival while being less toxic than previous treatment options. Areas covered The current scientific literature on safety and adverse events (AEs) related to anti-PD-1 therapies has been investigated with special attention to case reports and to the latest results announced at the major clinical cancer and melanoma meetings, including ASCO (American Society of Clinical Oncology), ESMO (European Society of medical Oncology) and EADO (European Association of Dermato-Oncology) annual meetings...
October 13, 2016: Expert Opinion on Drug Safety
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