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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29161567/the-biology-of-rem-sleep
#1
REVIEW
John Peever, Patrick M Fuller
Considerable advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and functions of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep have occurred over the past decade. Much of this progress can be attributed to the development of new neuroscience tools that have enabled high-precision interrogation of brain circuitry linked with REM sleep control, in turn revealing how REM sleep mechanisms themselves impact processes such as sensorimotor function. This review is intended to update the general scientific community about the recent mechanistic, functional and conceptual developments in our current understanding of REM sleep biology and pathobiology...
November 20, 2017: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29158072/test-retest-reliability-of-longitudinal-task-based-fmri-implications-for-developmental-studies
#2
REVIEW
Megan M Herting, Prapti Gautam, Zhanghua Chen, Adam Mezher, Nora C Vetter
Great advances have been made in functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies, including the use of longitudinal design to more accurately identify changes in brain development across childhood and adolescence. While longitudinal fMRI studies are necessary for our understanding of typical and atypical patterns of brain development, the variability observed in fMRI blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal and its test-retest reliability in developing populations remain a concern. Here we review the current state of test-retest reliability for child and adolescent fMRI studies (ages 5-18 years) as indexed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC)...
July 13, 2017: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29155296/optogenetic-manipulation-of-ens-the-brain-in-the-gut
#3
REVIEW
Wei Wang
Optogenetics has emerged as an important tool in neuroscience, especially in central nervous system research. It allows for the study of the brain's highly complex network with high temporal and spatial resolution. The enteric nervous system (ENS), the brain in the gut, plays critical roles for life. Although advanced progress has been made, the neural circuits of the ENS remain only partly understood because the appropriate research tools are lacking. In this review, I highlight the potential application of optogenetics in ENS research...
November 16, 2017: Life Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29152894/toward-a-comprehensive-theoretical-model-of-compassion-fatigue-an-integrative-literature-review
#4
REVIEW
Siedine K Coetzee, Heather K S Laschinger
This study was an integrative literature review in relation to compassion fatigue models, appraising these models, and developing a comprehensive theoretical model of compassion fatigue. A systematic search on PubMed, EbscoHost (Academic Search Premier, E-Journals, Medline, PsycINFO, Health Source Nursing/Academic Edition, CINAHL, MasterFILE Premier and Health Source Consumer Edition), gray literature, and manual searches of included reference lists was conducted in 2016. The studies (n = 11) were analyzed, and the strengths and limitations of the compassion fatigue models identified...
November 20, 2017: Nursing & Health Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29151590/microglia-and-macrophages-in-brain-homeostasis-and-disease
#5
REVIEW
Qingyun Li, Ben A Barres
Microglia and non-parenchymal macrophages in the brain are mononuclear phagocytes that are increasingly recognized to be essential players in the development, homeostasis and diseases of the central nervous system. With the availability of new genetic, molecular and pharmacological tools, considerable advances have been made towards our understanding of the embryonic origins, developmental programmes and functions of these cells. These exciting discoveries, some of which are still controversial, also raise many new questions, which makes brain macrophage biology a fast-growing field at the intersection of neuroscience and immunology...
November 20, 2017: Nature Reviews. Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149018/please-wait-processing-a-selective-literature-review-of-the-neurological-understanding-of-emotional-processing-in-asd-and-its-potential-contribution-to-neuroeducation
#6
REVIEW
Eric Shyman
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and its corresponding conditions have been investigated from a multitude of perspectives resulting in varying understandings of its origin, its outplay, its prognosis, and potential methods of intervention and education for individuals with the disorder. One area that has contributed significantly to providing a different type of understanding is that of neuroscience, and specifically neuroimaging. This paper will offer a selective literature review of research that investigates the role of emotional processing in ASD, and how a deepening of this line of understanding can be used to inform more comprehensive educational practices...
November 17, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29144411/nucleic-acid-aptamers-emerging-applications-in-medical-imaging-nanotechnology-neurosciences-and-drug-delivery
#7
REVIEW
Pascal Röthlisberger, Cécile Gasse, Marcel Hollenstein
Recent progresses in organic chemistry and molecular biology have allowed the emergence of numerous new applications of nucleic acids that markedly deviate from their natural functions. Particularly, DNA and RNA molecules-coined aptamers-can be brought to bind to specific targets with high affinity and selectivity. While aptamers are mainly applied as biosensors, diagnostic agents, tools in proteomics and biotechnology, and as targeted therapeutics, these chemical antibodies slowly begin to be used in other fields...
November 16, 2017: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29143053/recent-advances-in-microfluidic-technologies-for-cell-to-cell-interaction-studies
#8
REVIEW
Mario Rothbauer, Helene Zirath, Peter Ertl
Microfluidic cell cultures are ideally positioned to become the next generation of in vitro diagnostic tools for biomedical research, where key biological processes such as cell signalling and dynamic cell-to-cell interactions can be reliably analysed under reproducible physiological cell culture conditions. In the last decade, a large number of microfluidic cell analysis systems have been developed for a variety of applications including drug target optimization, drug screening and toxicological testing. More recently, advanced in vitro microfluidic cell culture systems have emerged that are capable of replicating the complex three-dimensional architectures of tissues and organs and thus represent valid biological models for investigating the mechanism and function of human tissue structures, as well as studying the onset and progression of diseases such as cancer...
November 16, 2017: Lab on a Chip
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29136236/basic-neuroscience-illuminates-causal-relationship-between-sleep-and-memory-translating-to-schizophrenia
#9
Ana Pocivavsek, Laura M Rowland
Patients with schizophrenia are often plagued by sleep disturbances that can exacerbate the illness, including potentiating psychosis and cognitive impairments. Cognitive dysfunction is a core feature of schizophrenia with learning and memory being particularly impaired. Sleep disruptions often accompanying the illness and may be key mechanism that contribute to these core dysfunctions. In this special translational neuroscience feature, we highlight the role of sleep in mediating cognitive function, with a special focus on learning and memory...
November 9, 2017: Schizophrenia Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29134267/complement-in-the-pathogenesis-of-alzheimer-s-disease
#10
REVIEW
B Paul Morgan
The emergence of complement as an important player in normal brain development and pathological remodelling has come as a major surprise to most scientists working in neuroscience and almost all those working in complement. That a system, evolved to protect the host against infection, should have these unanticipated roles has forced a rethink about what complement might be doing in the brain in health and disease, where it is coming from, and whether we can, or indeed should, manipulate complement in the brain to improve function or restore homeostasis...
November 13, 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29132408/using-semantics-for-representing-experimental-protocols
#11
Olga Giraldo, Alexander García, Federico López, Oscar Corcho
BACKGROUND: An experimental protocol is a sequence of tasks and operations executed to perform experimental research in biological and biomedical areas, e.g. biology, genetics, immunology, neurosciences, virology. Protocols often include references to equipment, reagents, descriptions of critical steps, troubleshooting and tips, as well as any other information that researchers deem important for facilitating the reusability of the protocol. Although experimental protocols are central to reproducibility, the descriptions are often cursory...
November 13, 2017: Journal of Biomedical Semantics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29130838/the-psychology-of-rituals-an-integrative-review-and-process-based-framework
#12
Nicholas M Hobson, Juliana Schroeder, Jane L Risen, Dimitris Xygalatas, Michael Inzlicht
Traditionally, ritual has been studied from broad sociocultural perspectives, with little consideration of the psychological processes at play. Recently, however, psychologists have begun turning their attention to the study of ritual, uncovering the causal mechanisms driving this universal aspect of human behavior. With growing interest in the psychology of ritual, this article provides an organizing framework to understand recent empirical work from social psychology, cognitive science, anthropology, behavioral economics, and neuroscience...
November 1, 2017: Personality and Social Psychology Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29125959/proximity-labeling-spatially-resolved-proteomic-mapping-for-neurobiology
#13
REVIEW
Shuo Han, Jiefu Li, Alice Y Ting
Understanding signaling pathways in neuroscience requires high-resolution maps of the underlying protein networks. Proximity-dependent biotinylation with engineered enzymes, in combination with mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics, has emerged as a powerful method to dissect molecular interactions and the localizations of endogenous proteins. Recent applications to neuroscience have provided insights into the composition of sub-synaptic structures, including the synaptic cleft and inhibitory post-synaptic density...
November 7, 2017: Current Opinion in Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29123945/the-anatomical-basis-for-dystonia-the-motor-network-model
#14
REVIEW
H A Jinnah, Vladimir Neychev, Ellen J Hess
Background: The dystonias include a clinically and etiologically very diverse group of disorders. There are both degenerative and non-degenerative subtypes resulting from genetic or acquired causes. Traditionally, all dystonias have been viewed as disorders of the basal ganglia. However, there has been increasing appreciation for involvement of other brain regions including the cerebellum, thalamus, midbrain, and cortex. Much of the early evidence for these other brain regions has come from studies of animals, but multiple recent studies have been done with humans, in an effort to confirm or refute involvement of these other regions...
2017: Tremor and Other Hyperkinetic Movements
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29122592/new-perspectives-on-the-brain-lesion-approach-implications-for-theoretical-models-of-human-memory
#15
Muireann Irish, Marlieke T R van Kesteren
Human lesion studies represent the cornerstone of modern day neuropsychology and provide an important adjunct to functional neuroimaging methods. The study of human lesion groups with damage to distinct regions of the brain permits the identification of underlying mechanisms and structures not only associated with, but essential for, complex cognitive processes. Here, we consider a recent review by McCormick et al. in which the power of the lesion model approach is elegantly presented with respect to a host of sophisticated cognitive endeavors, including autobiographical memory, future thinking, spatial navigation, and decision-making...
November 6, 2017: Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29119634/the-cerebral-basis-of-parkinsonian-tremor-a-network-perspective
#16
Rick C Helmich
Tremor in Parkinson's disease is a poorly understood sign. Although it is one of the clinical hallmarks of the disease, its pathophysiology remains unclear. It is clear that tremor involves different neural mechanisms than bradykinesia and rigidity, the other core motor signs of Parkinson's disease. In particular, the role of dopamine in tremor has been heavily debated given clinical observations that tremor has a variable response to dopaminergic medication. From a neuroscience perspective, tremor is also a special sign; unlike other motor signs, it has a clear electrophysiological signature (frequency, phase, and power)...
November 9, 2017: Movement Disorders: Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29118218/consciousness-regained-disentangling-mechanisms-brain-systems-and-behavioral-responses
#17
Johan F Storm, Mélanie Boly, Adenauer G Casali, Marcello Massimini, Umberto Olcese, Cyriel M A Pennartz, Melanie Wilke
How consciousness (experience) arises from and relates to material brain processes (the "mind-body problem") has been pondered by thinkers for centuries, and is regarded as among the deepest unsolved problems in science, with wide-ranging theoretical, clinical, and ethical implications. Until the last few decades, this was largely seen as a philosophical topic, but not widely accepted in mainstream neuroscience. Since the 1980s, however, novel methods and theoretical advances have yielded remarkable results, opening up the field for scientific and clinical progress...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29118216/circuit-and-synaptic-plasticity-mechanisms-of-drug-relapse
#18
Yan Dong, Jane R Taylor, Marina E Wolf, Yavin Shaham
High rates of relapse to drug use during abstinence is a defining feature of human drug addiction. This clinical scenario has been studied at the preclinical level using different animal models in which relapse to drug seeking is assessed after cessation of operant drug self-administration in rodents and monkeys. In our Society for Neuroscience (SFN) session entitled "Circuit and Synaptic Plasticity Mechanisms of Drug Relapse," we will discuss new developments of our understanding of circuits and synaptic plasticity mechanisms of drug relapse from studies combining established and novel animal models with state-of-the-art cellular, electrophysiology, anatomical, chemogenetic, and optogenetic methods...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29118213/volition-and-action-in-the-human-brain-processes-pathologies-and-reasons
#19
Itzhak Fried, Patrick Haggard, Biyu J He, Aaron Schurger
Humans seem to decide for themselves what to do, and when to do it. This distinctive capacity may emerge from an ability, shared with other animals, to make decisions for action that are related to future goals, or at least free from the constraints of immediate environmental inputs. Studying such volitional acts proves a major challenge for neuroscience. This review highlights key mechanisms in the generation of voluntary, as opposed to stimulus-driven actions, and highlights three issues. The first part focuses on the apparent spontaneity of voluntary action...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29117032/a-preliminary-observational-study-of-anovulatory-uterine-bleeding-after-aneurysmal-subarachnoid-hemorrhage
#20
Suzanne M Brown, Susan W Fifield, Michael A Pizzi, David Alejos, Alexa N Richie, Tri A Dinh, William P Cheshire, Shon E Meek, William D Freeman
INTRODUCTION: It was observed that women with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) tended to have earlier menses than a typical 21- to 28-day cycle. The goal was to determine whether there is an association between aSAH and early onset of menses. METHODS: All cases of aSAH in women aged 18 to 55 years who were admitted to our facility's neuroscience intensive care unit from June 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, were reviewed. The electronic healthcare record for each of these patients was examined for documentation of menses onset, computed tomography of the head, brain aneurysm characteristics, modified Fisher score and Glasgow Coma Scale on admission, presence/absence of vasospasm, medical/surgical history, and use of medications that affect the menstrual cycle...
December 2017: Journal of Neuroscience Nursing: Journal of the American Association of Neuroscience Nurses
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