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imperial college London

Fabrice Caudron, Smita Yadav
Septins are enigmatic proteins; they bind GTP and assemble together like molecular Lego blocks to form intracellular structures of varied shapes such as filaments, rings and gauzes. To shine light on the biological mysteries of septin proteins, leading experts in the field came together for the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) workshop held from 8-11 October 2017 in Berlin. Organized by Helge Ewers (Freie Universit├Ąt, Berlin, Germany) and Serge Mostowy (Imperial College, London, UK), the workshop convened at the Harnack-Haus, a historic hub of scientific discourse run by the Max Planck Society...
January 8, 2018: Journal of Cell Science
Rik Berkelmans, Billy Woods
The functional electrical stimulation (FES) bicycle race was an event at the Cybathlon, held in Zurich October 2016. BerkelBike BV (The Netherlands) in collaboration with Imperial College London entered a spinal cord injury pilot who had tetraplegia to compete in this event. The BerkelBike Pro is a commercially available FES capable recumbent which is normally driven by the arm- and leg power. The arm cranking part was disabled. Now the tricycle must be driven using the pilots own lower limb muscles through stimulation in accordance with race rules...
December 5, 2017: European Journal of Translational Myology
Gordon Mcouat
In 1957, John Burdon Sanderson (JBS) Haldane (1892-1964), the world's leading population geneticist, committed political radical and one of the three 'founders' of neo-Darwinian 'Modern Synthesis' of twentieth century biology (Sarkar 1995; Haldane 1932; Cain 2009; Smocovitis 1996), ostentatiously renounced both his British citizenship and his prestigious chair at University College London. In a decisively and very public anti-imperial gesture, ostensibly played out as a reaction to the Suez crisis (although his discontent was simmering for quite some time), Haldane, and his partner, geneticistHelen Spurway (1917-1977), turned their backs on Britain and set off to India to offer their considerable scientific prestige, their inexhaustible organisational abilities, along with their leading Journal of Genetics, behind the efforts to build a 'modern', democratic India emerging out of the ashes of colonial rule...
November 2017: Journal of Genetics
L A Owens, A Abbara, A Lerner, S O'floinn, G Christopoulos, S Khanjani, R Islam, K Hardy, A C Hanyaloglu, S A Lavery, W S Dhillo, S Franks
STUDY QUESTION: What are the in vivo and in vitro actions of kisspeptin-54 on the expression of genes involved in ovarian reproductive function, steroidogenesis and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) in granulosa lutein (GL) cells when compared with traditional triggers of oocyte maturation? SUMMARY ANSWER: The use of kisspeptin-54 as an oocyte maturation trigger augmented expression of genes involved in ovarian steroidogenesis in human GL cells including, FSH receptor (FSHR), LH/hCG receptor (LHCGR), steroid acute regulatory protein (STAR), aromatase, estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ESR1, ESR2), 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (3BHSD2) and inhibin A (INHBA), when compared to traditional maturation triggers, but did not alter markers of OHSS...
February 1, 2018: Human Reproduction
Carlo Palmieri, Rob C Stein, Xinxue Liu, Emma Hudson, Hanna Nicholas, Hironobu Sasano, Fouzia Guestini, Chris Holcombe, Sophie Barrett, Laura Kenny, Sadie Reed, Adrian Lim, Larry Hayward, Sacha Howell, R Charles Coombes
In the original publication of the article, a part of acknowledgement section was missed out. The omitted acknowledgement is given below: 'The study was coordinated by the Imperial Clinical Trials Unit-Cancer, Imperial College London and Sponsored by Imperial College London. The Imperial Clinical Trials Unit receives funding from the National Institute for Health (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre based at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust and Imperial College London. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health...
October 25, 2017: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
Sian Harding, Dorian Haskard, Kim Fox
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 14, 2017: European Heart Journal
Xu Tian, Wei-Qing Chen, Jie-Li Huang, Lan-Ying He, Bang-Lun Liu, Xi Liu, Hang Zhou, Bing-Rong Liu
INTRODUCTION: Colonoscopy has been regarded as a standard method of detecting and removing gastrointestinal lesions early, while adequate bowel preparation is the prerequisite of determining the diagnostic accuracy and treatment safety of this process. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) based bowel preparation regimens remain the first recommendation, but the optimal option is still uncertain. The aim of this systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is to determine the optimal PEG based bowel preparation regimen before colonoscopy...
October 16, 2017: BMJ Open
Agra Dilshani Hunukumbure, Susan F Smith, Saroj Das
BACKGROUND: High quality feedback is vital to learning in medical education but many students and teachers have expressed dissatisfaction on current feedback practices. Lack of teachers' insight into students' feedback requirements may be a key, which might be addressed by giving control to the students with student led feedback practices. The conceptual framework was built on three dimensions of learning theory by Illeris and Vygotsky's zone of proximal development and scaffolding. We introduced a feedback session with self-reflection and peer feedback in the form of open discussion on video-recorded student performances under teacher's guidance...
September 29, 2017: BMC Medical Education
Jose D Herazo-Maya, Jiehuan Sun, Philip L Molyneaux, Qin Li, Julian A Villalba, Argyrios Tzouvelekis, Heather Lynn, Brenda M Juan-Guardela, Cristobal Risquez, Juan C Osorio, Xiting Yan, George Michel, Nachelle Aurelien, Kathleen O Lindell, Melinda J Klesen, Miriam F Moffatt, William O Cookson, Yingze Zhang, Joe G N Garcia, Imre Noth, Antje Prasse, Ziv Bar-Joseph, Kevin F Gibson, Hongyu Zhao, Erica L Herzog, Ivan O Rosas, Toby M Maher, Naftali Kaminski
BACKGROUND: The clinical course of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is unpredictable. Clinical prediction tools are not accurate enough to predict disease outcomes. METHODS: We enrolled patients with IPF diagnosis in a six-cohort study at Yale University (New Haven, CT, USA), Imperial College London (London, UK), University of Chicago (Chicago, IL, USA), University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA, USA), University of Freiburg (Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany), and Brigham and Women's Hospital-Harvard Medical School (Boston, MA, USA)...
November 2017: Lancet Respiratory Medicine
Ann M Carracher, Payal H Marathe, Kelly L Close
More than 31,000 attendeesfrom around the world gathered in Barcelona, Spain for the 2017 European Society of Cardiology conference. In presentinga post-hoc analysis of the Liraglutide and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetes(LEADER)(1) trial, Dr Neil Poulter (Imperial College London, UK) showedthat results are still positive, indicating cardioprotection, after adjusting for baseline history of stroke or myocardial infarction (MI), which had no mediating effect on the significant association between Novo Nordisk's (Copenhagen, Denmark) glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist Victoza (liraglutide) and cardiovascular risk reduction...
September 15, 2017: Journal of Diabetes
Joanna James
After qualifying as a nurse at St Mary's Hospital in London in 1988, Joanna James spent 20 years working in emergency departments. She co-developed and ran a successful education programme around the needs of refugees and survivors of torture. In 2008 she changed direction and started working on improving services for people with dementia in hospital. She is now lead nurse for dementia at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust in London.
August 2, 2017: Nursing Standard
Benjamin P Jones, Srdjan Saso, Jessica Farren, Mona El-Bahrawy, Sadaf Ghaem-Maghami, J Richard Smith, Joseph Yazbek
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to demonstrate the use of intraoperative ultrasound-guided ovarian wedge resection in the treatment of recurrent serous borderline ovarian tumors (sBOTs) that are too small to be visualized laparoscopically. METHODS: This was a prospective analysis of all women with recurrent sBOTs that were not visible laparoscopically, who underwent intraoperative ultrasound-guided ovarian wedge resection between January 2015 and December 2016 at the West London Gynaecological Cancer Centre, Imperial College NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom...
November 2017: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 1, 2017: Science Progress
Justin Davies, Andrew Tochterman
Justin Davies and Andrew Tochterman speak to Adam Price-Evans, Commissioning Editor of Future Cardiology: Justin Davies is a Senior Research Fellow and Honorary Consultant Cardiologist at the National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London (UK). His main research interests include the development and application of pioneering technologies in engineering to aid understanding of disease mechanisms, and in the diagnosis of pathological disease states. After completing his undergraduate training at Imperial College, he was awarded a prestigious British Heart Foundation research fellowship to undertake his PhD at Imperial College...
July 2017: Future Cardiology
Sarim Siddiqui, Samee Siddiqui, Qamar Mustafa, Abeer F Rizvi, Ibtesham T Hossain
BACKGROUND: Peer-assisted learning (PAL) and mock examinations have been credited as effective teaching tools; however, there is a lack of research into their effectiveness in PACES (practical assessment of clinical examination skills). This study demonstrates an effective model and the benefits of PAL after its implementation in a mock PACES at Imperial College London. There is a lack of research into the effectiveness of PAL and mock examinations in PACES METHODS: A mock PACES was designed for fifth-year medical students...
June 14, 2017: Clinical Teacher
Jose Salvador Marcano Belisario, Kevin Doherty, John O'Donoghue, Paul Ramchandani, Azeem Majeed, Gavin Doherty, Cecily Morrison, Josip Car
INTRODUCTION: Depression is a common mental health disorder during pregnancy, with important consequences for mothers and their children. Despite this, it goes undiagnosed and untreated in many women attending antenatal care. Smartphones could help support the prompt identification of antenatal depression in this setting. In addition, these devices enable the implementation of ecological momentary assessment techniques, which could be used to assess how mood is experienced during pregnancy...
May 29, 2017: BMJ Open
William H Brock
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 19, 2017: Ambix
Thomas Menter, Pritesh Trivedi, Raida Ahmad, Rashpal Flora, Stephan Dirnhofer, Alexandar Tzankov, Kikkeri N Naresh
Objectives: Recent studies have shown that lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1 (LEF1) is a useful marker for chronic lymphocytic B-cell leukemia (CLL)/small lymphocytic lymphoma. Yet, it is not still being widely used in a diagnostic setting. In this study, we document the experience with LEF1 immunohistochemistry during routine diagnostics. Methods: In total, 191 B-cell lymphoma cases from Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College NHS Healthcare Trust (London, UK) were investigated by immunohistochemistry for LEF1 during routine diagnostic workup...
March 1, 2017: American Journal of Clinical Pathology
Keith Peters, Jim Smith
The Francis Crick Institute Laboratory, opened in 2016, is supported by the Medical Research Council, Cancer Research UK, the Wellcome Trust, and University College London, King's College London and Imperial College London. The emphasis on research training and early independence of gifted scientists in a multidisciplinary environment provides unique opportunities for UK medical science, including clinical and translational research.
April 2017: Clinical Medicine: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of London
F L Foo, A Collins, C M McEniery, P R Bennett, I B Wilkinson, C C Lees
STUDY QUESTION: Are there differences in preconception cardiovascular function between women who have a viable pregnancy and those who have a first trimester miscarriage? SUMMARY ANSWER: Preconception cardiovascular function of central haemodynamics and arterial function are similar between women who have a viable pregnancy and those who have a first trimester miscarriage. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Miscarriages have been associated with increased long-term cardiovascular disease risk, and arterial and cardiovascular dysfunction has been hypothesised as the common link...
May 1, 2017: Human Reproduction
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