Read by QxMD icon Read

Alzheimer Spinal cord

Woo Suk Tae, Byung Joo Ham, Sung Bom Pyun, Shin Hyuk Kang, Byung Jo Kim
Diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) is a noninvasive medical imaging tool used to investigate the structure of white matter. The signal contrast in DTI is generated by differences in the Brownian motion of the water molecules in brain tissue. Postprocessed DTI scalars can be used to evaluate changes in the brain tissue caused by disease, disease progression, and treatment responses, which has led to an enormous amount of interest in DTI in clinical research. This review article provides insights into DTI scalars and the biological background of DTI as a relatively new neuroimaging modality...
February 28, 2018: Journal of Clinical Neurology
Kartik T Nakhate, Ashish P Bharne, Vinay Sagar Verma, Deepali N Aru, Dadasaheb M Kokare
Although plumbagin (5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) protects against cerebral ischemia and spinal cord injury-induced oxidative stress and inflammation by activating the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 /antioxidant response element (Nrf2/ARE) pathway, its role in the amelioration of neurodegenerative diseases remains unexplored. In the present study, we investigated the effect of plumbagin on Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like condition in mice. The animals were treated intracerebroventricularly with streptozotocin (STZ; 3 mg/kg) twice, on day 1 and 3, to induce AD-like condition, and the symptoms were evaluated after 14 days...
February 28, 2018: Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy, Biomédecine & Pharmacothérapie
Maja Vulovic, Nevena Divac, Igor Jakovcevski
The nervous system is a notable exception to the rule that the cell is the structural and functional unit of tissue systems and organs. The functional unit of the nervous system is the synapse, the contact between two nerve cells. As such, synapses are the foci of investigations of nervous system organization and function, as well as a potential readout for the progression of various disorders of the nervous system. In the past decade the development of antibodies specific to presynaptic terminals has enabled us to assess, at the optical, laser scanning microscopy level, these subcellular structures, and has provided a simple method for the quantification of various synapses...
2018: Frontiers in Neuroanatomy
Adebimpe O Obembe, Charlie H Goldsmith, Lisa A Simpson, Brodie M Sakakibara, Janice J Eng
BACKGROUND: Social support can help to deal with the consequences of neurological conditions and promote functional independence and quality of life. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of neurological conditions on the use of support and health-care services in a population-based sample of community-dwelling adults with neurological conditions. METHODS: Data were from the Survey of Living with Neurological Conditions in Canada, which was derived from a representative sample of household residents...
2018: PloS One
Charlotte Veyrat-Durebex, Pascal Reynier, Vincent Procaccio, Rudolf Hergesheimer, Philippe Corcia, Christian R Andres, Hélène Blasco
A ketogenic diet (KD) is a normocaloric diet composed by high fat (80-90%), low carbohydrate, and low protein consumption that induces fasting-like effects. KD increases ketone body (KBs) production and its concentration in the blood, providing the brain an alternative energy supply that enhances oxidative mitochondrial metabolism. In addition to its profound impact on neuro-metabolism and bioenergetics, the neuroprotective effect of specific polyunsaturated fatty acids and KBs involves pleiotropic mechanisms, such as the modulation of neuronal membrane excitability, inflammation, or reactive oxygen species production...
2018: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Federico Verde, Kelly Del Tredici, Heiko Braak, Albert Ludolph
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is traditionally considered a disease affecting exclusively motor neurons. However, much evidence points towards additional involvement of brain systems other than the motor. As much as half of ALS patients display cognitive-behavioral disturbances. ALS shares with a considerable proportion of FTD cases the same neuropathological substrate, namely, inclusions of abnormally phosphorylated protein TDP-43 (pTDP-43). In analogy with pathological staging systems elaborated in the past decades for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), a model of staging of pTDP-43 pathology in sporadic ALS (sALS) has been recently proposed...
December 1, 2017: Archives Italiennes de Biologie
Amaly Nokkari, Hadi Abou-El-Hassan, Yehia Mechref, Stefania Mondello, Mark S Kindy, Ayad A Jaffa, Firas Kobeissy
Neurological disorders represent major health concerns in terms of comorbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite a tremendous increase in our understanding of the pathophysiological processes involved in disease progression and prevention, the accumulated knowledge so far resulted in relatively moderate translational benefits in terms of therapeutic interventions and enhanced clinical outcomes. Aiming at specific neural molecular pathways, different strategies have been geared to target the development and progression of such disorders...
January 16, 2018: Progress in Neurobiology
Luisa Aring, Simone Steinbach, Katrin Marcus, Caroline May
Humans age and the ageing process affects cells in all areas of the human body, including nerve cells within the brain. With advancing age there is also a rise in the probability of developing a neurodegenerative disorder such as, e.g., amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, or Alzheimer's disease. In all these age-related neurodegenerative disorders, distinct neuron populations within specific brain regions are primarily affected. For example, Parkinson's disease is characterized by a slowly progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra whereas the entorhinal cortex is first affected in Alzheimer's disease...
2018: Methods in Molecular Biology
Dongao Zhang, Gang Lv
GLP-1 signaling pathway has been well studied for its role in regulating glucose homeostasis, as well as its beneficial effects in energy and nutrient metabolism. A number of drugs based on GLP-1 have been used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. GLP-1R is expressed in multiple organs and numerous experimental studies have demonstrated that GLP-1 signaling pathway exhibits pro-survival functions in various disorders. In the central nervous system, stimulation of GLP-1R produces neuroprotective effects in specific neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease...
January 9, 2018: Peptides
Laura Louise Scott, Timothy Grant Downing
Although cyanobacterial β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been implicated in the development of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), Parkinson's Disease (PD) and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), no BMAA animal model has reproduced all the neuropathology typically associated with these neurodegenerative diseases. We present here a neonatal BMAA model that causes β-amyloid deposition, neurofibrillary tangles of hyper-phosphorylated tau, TDP-43 inclusions, Lewy bodies, microbleeds and microgliosis as well as severe neuronal loss in the hippocampus, striatum, substantia nigra pars compacta, and ventral horn of the spinal cord in rats following a single BMAA exposure...
December 29, 2017: Toxins
Laura Louise Scott, Timothy Grant Downing
Cyanobacterial β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been suggested as a causative or contributory factor in the development of several neurodegenerative diseases. However, no BMAA animal model has adequately shown clinical or behavioral symptoms that correspond to those seen in either Alzheimer's Disease (AD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) or Parkinson's Disease (PD). We present here the first data that show that when neonatal rats were exposed to BMAA on postnatal days 3, 4 and 5, but not on gestational day 14 or postnatally on days 7 or 10, several AD and/or PD-related behavioral, locomotor and cognitive deficits developed...
December 27, 2017: Toxins
Qiuju Yuan, Jian Yang, Wutian Wu, Zhi-Xiu Lin
There have been an increasing number of reports of non-cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Some symptoms are associated with the loss of motor functions, e.g. gait disturbances, disturbed activity level and balance. Consistent with clinical findings, several AD mouse models harboring amyloid pathology develop motor impairment. Although the factors that contribute to the motor deficits have not yet been determined, it has been suggested that axonopathy is one of the key factors that may contribute to this particular feature of the disease...
November 17, 2017: Oncotarget
Fatemeh Seifar, Mohammad Khalili, Habib Khaledyan, Shirin Amiri Moghadam, Azimeh Izadi, Amirreza Azimi, Seied Kazem Shakouri
OBJECTIVES: α-lipoic acid (ALA) is a natural antioxidant which acts as a cofactor of bioenergetic mitochondrial enzymes. Along with its mitochondrial action, ALA and its reduced form have many biological functions resulting in a wide variety of actions such as anti-inflammation and antioxidant protection, scavenging reactive oxygen species, regenerating other antioxidant agents, such as vitamins C and E, and cytosolic glutathione, chelating the transitional metal ions (e.g. iron and copper), and modulating the signal transduction of nuclear factor...
November 29, 2017: Nutritional Neuroscience
Tak-Ho Chu, Karen Cummins, Joseph S Sparling, Shigeki Tsutsui, Craig Brideau, K Peter R Nilsson, Jeffrey T Joseph, Peter K Stys
As an extension of the brain, the spinal cord has unique properties which could allow us to gain a better understanding of CNS pathology. The brain and cord share the same cellular components, yet the latter is simpler in cytoarchitecture and connectivity. In Alzheimer's research, virtually all focus is on brain pathology, however it has been shown that transgenic Alzheimer's mouse models accumulate beta amyloid plaques in spinal cord, suggesting that the cord possesses the same molecular machinery and conditions for plaque formation...
2017: PloS One
Petra Steinacker, Federico Verde, Lubin Fang, Emily Feneberg, Patrick Oeckl, Sigrun Roeber, Sarah Anderl-Straub, Adrian Danek, Janine Diehl-Schmid, Klaus Fassbender, Klaus Fliessbach, Hans Foerstl, Armin Giese, Holger Jahn, Jan Kassubek, Johannes Kornhuber, G Bernhard Landwehrmeyer, Martin Lauer, Elmar Hans Pinkhardt, Johannes Prudlo, Angela Rosenbohm, Anja Schneider, Matthias L Schroeter, Hayrettin Tumani, Christine A F von Arnim, Jochen Weishaupt, Patrick Weydt, Albert C Ludolph, Deniz Yilmazer Hanke, Markus Otto
OBJECTIVES: Neurochemical markers of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) that reflect underlying disease mechanisms might help in diagnosis, staging and prediction of outcome. We aimed at determining the origin and differential diagnostic and prognostic potential of the putative marker of microglial activation chitotriosidase (CHIT1). METHODS: Altogether 316 patients were included, comprising patients with sporadic ALS, ALS mimics (disease controls (DCo)), frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and healthy controls (Con)...
November 15, 2017: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry
Agnieszka Wnuk, Małgorzata Kajta
Apoptosis and autophagy are involved in neural development and in the response of the nervous system to a variety of insults. Apoptosis is responsible for cell elimination, whereas autophagy can eliminate the cells or keep them alive, even in conditions lacking trophic factors. Therefore, both processes may function synergistically or antagonistically. Steroid and xenobiotic receptors are regulators of apoptosis and autophagy; however, their actions in various pathologies are complex. In general, the estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and mineralocorticoid (MR) receptors mediate anti-apoptotic signalling, whereas the androgen (AR) and glucocorticoid (GR) receptors participate in pro-apoptotic pathways...
November 11, 2017: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Tian-Shin Yeh, Yu-Chun Ho, Cherng-Lan Hsu, Shin-Liang Pan
STUDY DESIGN: Propensity score-matched, retrospective cohort study. OBJECTIVES: To determine the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). SETTING: The present study used Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. METHODS: A total of 9257 patients who had ⩾2 ambulatory visits with a diagnosis of SCI in 2001 were included in the SCI group. The non-SCI group consisted of 37,028 propensity score-matched patients without a diagnosis of SCI...
October 23, 2017: Spinal Cord
Hong Joo Kim, J Paul Taylor
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. The hallmark pathological feature in most cases of ALS is nuclear depletion and cytoplasmic accumulation of the protein TDP-43 in degenerating neurons. Consistent with this pattern of intracellular protein redistribution, impaired nucleocytoplasmic trafficking has emerged as a mechanism contributing to ALS pathology. Dysfunction in nucleocytoplasmic transport is also an emerging theme in physiological aging and other related neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases...
October 11, 2017: Neuron
Josue D Ordaz, Wei Wu, Xiao-Ming Xu
Neural degeneration and regeneration are important topics in neurological diseases. There are limited options for therapeutic interventions in neurological diseases that provide simultaneous spatial and temporal control of neurons. This drawback increases side effects due to non-specific targeting. Optogenetics is a technology that allows precise spatial and temporal control of cells. Therefore, this technique has high potential as a therapeutic strategy for neurological diseases. Even though the application of optogenetics in understanding brain functional organization and complex behaviour states have been elaborated, reviews of its therapeutic potential especially in neurodegeneration and regeneration are still limited...
August 2017: Neural Regeneration Research
Francesca Longhena, PierFranco Spano, Arianna Bellucci
The formation of protein aggregates and inclusions in the brain and spinal cord is a common neuropathological feature of a number of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and many others. These are commonly referred as neurodegenerative proteinopathies or protein-misfolding diseases. The main characteristic of protein aggregates in these disorders is the fact that they are enriched in amyloid fibrils. Since protein aggregation is considered to play a central role for the onset of neurodegenerative proteinopathies, research is ongoing to develop strategies aimed at preventing or removing protein aggregation in the brain of affected patients...
October 1, 2017: Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"