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Pediatric brain death

Ruchi Kaushik, Isabelle M Krisch, Darrell R Schroeder, Randall Flick, Michael E Nemergut
BACKGROUND: Head injuries are the leading cause of death among cyclists, 85 % of which can be prevented by wearing a bicycle helmet. This study aims to estimate the incidence of pediatric bicycle-related injuries in Olmsted County and assess differences in injuries between those wearing helmets vs. not. METHODS: Olmsted County, Minnesota residents 5 to 18 years of age with a diagnostic code consistent with an injury associated with the use of a bicycle between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2011, were identified...
December 2015: Injury Epidemiology
Ashley Blanchard, Keven I Cabrera, Nathan Kuppermann, Peter S Dayan
OBJECTIVES: We aimed to determine the prevalence of and adverse outcomes caused by pneumocephali in children with minor blunt head trauma who had no other intracranial injuries (ie, isolated pneumocephali). METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis of a public use dataset from a multicenter prospective study of pediatric minor head trauma. We included children younger than 18 years with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 14 or 15 and non-trivial mechanisms of injury who had cranial computed tomographies obtained...
October 6, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Ursula I Tuor, Min Qiao, Manasi Sule, Melissa Morgunov, Tadeusz Foniok
Stroke is a major cause of disability in adults and children. Recently, we have developed an adult rat model of minor stroke containing a peri-infarct region with a modest T2 increase and mild ischemic damage. We hypothesized that a neonatal minor stroke with mild peri-ischemic changes could also be produced, but with potential ontogenic differences. Using our minor photothrombosis method, we produced a range of severities of ischemic lesions (mini, minor, moderate and severe) within magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slices of adult and neonatal rats...
October 12, 2016: NMR in Biomedicine
Jeremy S Francis, Ireneusz Wojtas, Vladimir Markov, Steven J Gray, Thomas J McCown, R Jude Samulski, Larissa T Bilaniuk, Dah-Jyuu Wang, Darryl C De Vivo, Christopher G Janson, Paola Leone
Breakdown of neuro-glial N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) metabolism results in the failure of developmental myelination, manifest in the congenital pediatric leukodystrophy Canavan disease caused by mutations to the sole NAA catabolizing enzyme aspartoacylase. Canavan disease is a major point of focus for efforts to define NAA function, with available evidence suggesting NAA serves as an acetyl donor for fatty acid synthesis during myelination. Elevated NAA is a diagnostic hallmark of Canavan disease, which contrasts with a broad spectrum of alternative neurodegenerative contexts in which levels of NAA are inversely proportional to pathological progression...
October 4, 2016: Neurobiology of Disease
Shanghao Li, Daniel Amat, Zhili Peng, Steven Vanni, Scott Raskin, Guillermo De Angulo, Abdelhameed M Othman, Regina M Graham, Roger M Leblanc
Among various cancers, pediatric brain tumors represent the most common cancer type in children and the second most common cause of cancer related deaths. Anticancer drugs and therapies, such as doxorubicin (Dox), have severe side effects on patients during chemotherapy, especially for children as their bodies are still under development. These side effects are believed to be due to the lack of a delivery system with high efficacy and targeting selectivity, resulting in serious damages of normal cells. To improve the efficacy and selectivity, the transferrin (Trans) receptor mediated endocytosis can be utilized for drug delivery system design, as transferrin receptors are expressed on the blood brain barrier (BBB) and often over expressed in brain tumor cells...
September 22, 2016: Nanoscale
J Alex Strahan, William H Walker, Taylor R Montgomery, Nancy G Forger
Minocycline, an antibiotic of the tetracycline family, inhibits microglia in many paradigms and is among the most commonly used tools for examining the role of microglia in physiological processes. Microglia may play an active role in triggering developmental neuronal cell death, although findings have been contradictory. To determine whether microglia influence developmental cell death, we treated perinatal mice with minocycline (45 mg/kg) and quantified effects on dying cells and microglial labeling using immunohistochemistry for activated caspase-3 (AC3) and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1), respectively...
October 5, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
Ciaran S Hill, Aaron L McLean, Mark H Wilson
OBJECTIVE: Pediatric traumatic brain injury is the most common cause of death and a major cause of morbidity in children and young adults worldwide. Despite this, our understanding of epidemiological factors relating to this type of injury is incomplete. The objective of this study was to explore a variety of factors relating to these injuries including mechanism, timing of emergency response, prehospital management, radiological diagnosis, neurosurgical care, and final outcomes. METHODS: A retrospective review of all pediatric traumas attending a single large, densely populated urban area within a 2-year period was undertaken, and all cases with significant pediatric traumatic brain injury, as defined by a computed tomography scan showing an intracranial injury, were included for further analysis...
September 9, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Raffaella Moretti, Vibol Chhor, Donatella Bettati, Elena Banino, Silvana De Lucia, Tifenn Le Charpentier, Sophie Lebon, Leslie Schwendimann, Julien Pansiot, Sowmyalakshmi Rasika, Vincent Degos, Luigi Titomanlio, Pierre Gressens, Bobbi Fleiss
The cognitive and behavioral deficits caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI) to the immature brain are more severe and persistent than injuries to the adult brain. Understanding this developmental sensitivity is critical because children under 4 years of age of sustain TBI more frequently than any other age group. One of the first events after TBI is the infiltration and degranulation of mast cells (MCs) in the brain, releasing a range of immunomodulatory substances; inhibition of these cells is neuroprotective in other types of neonatal brain injury...
December 2016: Journal of Neuroscience Research
Emilyn Banfield, Austin L Brown, Erin C Peckham, Surya P Rednam, Jeffrey Murray, M Fatih Okcu, Laura E Mitchell, Murali M Chintagumpala, Ching C Lau, Michael E Scheurer, Philip J Lupo
AIM: Medulloblastoma is the most frequent malignant pediatric brain tumor. While survival rates have improved due to multimodal treatment including cisplatin-based chemotherapy, there are few prognostic factors for adverse treatment outcomes. Notably, genes involved in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, including ERCC2, have been implicated in cisplatin sensitivity in other cancers. Therefore, this study evaluated the role of ERCC2 DNA methylation profiles on pediatric medulloblastoma survival...
October 2016: Cancer Epidemiology
Samantha L Schoell, Ashley A Weaver, Jennifer W Talton, Gretchen Baker, Andrea N Doud, Ryan T Barnard, Joel D Stitzel, Mark R Zonfrillo
OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to develop a disability-based metric for motor vehicle crash (MVC) injuries, with a focus on head injuries, and compare the functional outcomes between the pediatric and adult populations. METHODS: Disability risk (DR) was quantified using Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scores within the National Trauma Data Bank-Research Data System (NTDB-RDS) for the top 95% most frequently occurring Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) 3, 4, and 5 head injuries in NASS-CDS 2000-2011...
September 2016: Traffic Injury Prevention
Adam M H Young, Mathew R Guilfoyle, Helen Fernandes, Matthew R Garnett, Shruti Agrawal, Peter J Hutchinson
OBJECTIVE There is increasing interest in the use of predictive models of outcome in adult head injury. Two international models have been identified to be reliable modalities for predicting outcome: the Corticosteroid Randomisation After Significant Head Injury (CRASH) model, and the International Mission on Prognosis and Analysis of randomized Controlled Trials in TBI (IMPACT) model. However, these models are designed only to identify outcomes in adult populations. METHODS A retrospective analysis was performed on pediatric patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of Addenbrooke's Hospital between January 2009 and December 2013...
August 26, 2016: Journal of Neurosurgery. Pediatrics
Zeljko J Bosnjak, Sarah Logan, Yanan Liu, Xiaowen Bai
Mounting evidence has demonstrated that general anesthetics could induce developmental neurotoxicity, including acute widespread neuronal cell death, followed by long-term memory and learning abnormalities. Propofol is a commonly used intravenous anesthetic agent for the induction and maintenance of anesthesia and procedural and critical care sedation in children. Compared with other anesthetic drugs, little information is available on its potential contributions to neurotoxicity. Growing evidence from multiple experimental models showed a similar neurotoxic effect of propofol as observed in other anesthetic drugs, raising serious concerns regarding pediatric propofol anesthesia...
August 22, 2016: Anesthesia and Analgesia
Rebecca L Holt, Eric Arehart, Arsen Hunanyan, Nina A Fainberg, Mohamad A Mikati
Several factors, such as epilepsy syndrome, poor compliance, and increased seizure frequency increase the risks of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Animal models have revealed that the mechanisms of SUDEP involve initially a primary event, often a seizure of sufficient type and severity, that occurs in a brain, which is vulnerable to SUDEP due to either genetic or antecedent factors. This primary event initiates a cascade of secondary events starting, as some models indicate, with cortical spreading depolarization that propagates to the brainstem where it results in autonomic dysfunction...
May 2016: Seminars in Pediatric Neurology
Catherine E Creeley
The fetal and neonatal periods are critical and sensitive periods for neurodevelopment, and involve rapid brain growth in addition to natural programmed cell death (i.e., apoptosis) and synaptic pruning. Apoptosis is an important process for neurodevelopment, preventing redundant, faulty, or unused neurons from cluttering the developing brain. However, animal studies have shown massive neuronal cell death by apoptosis can also be caused by exposure to several classes of drugs, namely gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonists and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists that are commonly used in pediatric anesthesia...
August 16, 2016: Brain Sciences
Heather Smith, AmiLyn Taplin, Sohail Syed, Matthew A Adamo
OBJECTIVE Malignant disease of the CNS is the primary etiology for deaths resulting from cancer in the pediatric population. It has been well documented that outcomes of pediatric neurosurgery rely on the extent of tumor resection. Therefore, techniques that improve surgical results have significant clinical implications. Intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS) offers real-time surgical guidance and a more accurate means for detecting residual tumor that is inconspicuous to the naked eye. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation of extent of resection between IOUS and postoperative MRI...
July 29, 2016: Journal of Neurosurgery. Pediatrics
Thierry A G M Huisman, Andrea Poretti
Traumatic brain and spine injury (TBI/TSI) is a leading cause of death and lifelong disability in children. The biomechanical properties of the child's brain, skull, and spine, the size of the child, the age-specific activity pattern, and variance in trauma mechanisms result in a wide range of age-specific traumas and patterns of brain and spine injuries. A detailed knowledge about the various types of primary and secondary pediatric head and spine injuries is essential to better identify and understand pediatric TBI/TSI, which enhances sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis, will guide therapy, and may give important information about the prognosis...
2016: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
Andre D Furtado, Ashok Panigrahy, Charles R Fitz
Primary CNS tumors consist of a diverse group of neoplasms originating from various cell types in the CNS. Brain tumors are the most common solid malignancy in children under the age of 15 years and the second leading cause of cancer death after leukemia. The most common brain neoplasms in children differ consistently from those in older age groups. Pediatric brain tumors demonstrate distinct patterns of occurrence and biologic behavior according to sex, age, and race. This chapter highlights the imaging features of the most common tumors that affect the child's CNS (brain and spinal cord)...
2016: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
Scott Boop, Mary Axente, Blakely Weatherford, Paul Klimo
OBJECTIVE Research on pediatric abusive head trauma (AHT) has largely focused on clinical presentation and management. The authors sought to review a single-institution experience from a public health perspective to gain a better understanding of the local population affected, determine overall incidence and seasonal trends, and provide details on the initial hospitalization, including extent of injuries, neurosurgical interventions, and hospital charges. METHODS All cases of AHT involving patients who presented to Le Bonheur Children's Hospital (LBCH) from 2009 through 2014 were identified...
July 12, 2016: Journal of Neurosurgery. Pediatrics
Magdalena Zakrzewska, Wojciech Fendler, Krzysztof Zakrzewski, Beata Sikorska, Wiesława Grajkowska, Bożenna Dembowska-Bagińska, Iwona Filipek, Łukasz Stefańczyk, Paweł P Liberski
BACKGROUND: Ependymal tumors are the third most common group of brain tumors in children, accounting for about 10% of all primary brain neoplasms. According to the current WHO classification, they comprise four entities with the most frequent ependymoma and anaplastic ependymoma. The most of pediatric tumors are located within the posterior fossa, with a tendency to infiltrate the vital brain structures. This limits surgical resection and poses a considerable clinical problem. Moreover, there are no appropriate outcome prognostic factors besides the extent of surgical resection...
2016: PloS One
Megan M Marlow, Sumedh S Shah, Eduardo A Véliz, Michael E Ivan, Regina M Graham
Resistance mechanisms employed by high-grade gliomas allow them to successfully evade current standard treatment of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Withaferin A (WA), utilized in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries, is attracting attention for its antitumor capabilities. Here we review pertinent literature on WA as a high-grade glioma treatment, and discuss the cancerous mechanisms it affects. WA is relatively nontoxic and has shown potential in crossing the blood-brain barrier. WA prevents p53 alterations and inactivates overexpressed MDM2 through ARF and ROS production...
July 2, 2016: Journal of Natural Medicines
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