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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29154624/task-demands-determine-comparison-strategy-in-whole-probe-change-detection
#1
Rob Udale, Simon Farrell, Chris Kent
Detecting a change in our visual world requires a process that compares the external environment (test display) with the contents of memory (study display). We addressed the question of whether people strategically adapt the comparison process in response to different decision loads. Study displays of 3 colored items were presented, followed by 'whole-display' probes containing 3 colored shapes. Participants were asked to decide whether any probed items contained a new feature. In Experiments 1-4, irrelevant changes to the probed item's locations or feature bindings influenced memory performance, suggesting that participants employed a comparison process that relied on spatial locations...
November 20, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29154622/how-does-not-left-become-right-electrophysiological-evidence-for-a-dynamic-conflict-bound-negation-processing-account
#2
Carolin Dudschig, Barbara Kaup
Human thought and language is traditionally considered as abstract, amodal, and symbolic. However, recent theories propose that high-level human cognition is directly linked to basic, modal biological systems such as sensorimotor areas. Despite this influential representational debate very little is known regarding whether the mechanisms involved in sensorimotor control are also shared with higher-level cognitive processes, such as language comprehension. We investigated negation as a universal of human language, addressing two key questions: (a) Does negation result in a conflict-like representation? (b) Does negation trigger executive control adjustments in a similar manner as standard information processing conflicts do (e...
November 20, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29154033/measuring-preschool-learning-engagement-in-the-laboratory
#3
Simone E Halliday, Susan D Calkins, Esther M Leerkes
Learning engagement is a critical factor for academic achievement and successful school transitioning. However, current methods of assessing learning engagement in young children are limited to teacher report or classroom observation, which may limit the types of research questions one could assess about this construct. The current study investigated the validity of a novel assessment designed to measure behavioral learning engagement among young children in a standardized laboratory setting and examined how learning engagement in the laboratory relates to future classroom adjustment...
November 16, 2017: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29151803/cognitive-consequences-of-trilingualism
#4
Scott R Schroeder, Viorica Marian
Aims and Objectives: The objectives of the present research were to examine the cognitive consequences of trilingualism and explain them relative to the cognitive consequences of bilingualism. Approach: A comparison of cognitive abilities in trilinguals and bilinguals was conducted. In addition, we proposed a cognitive plasticity framework to account for cognitive differences and similarities between trilinguals and bilinguals. Data and Analysis: Three aspects of cognition were analyzed: (1) cognitive reserve in older adults, as measured by age of onset of Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment; (2) inhibitory control in children and younger adults, as measured by response times on behavioral Simon and flanker tasks; and (3) memory generalization in infants and toddlers, as measured by accuracy on behavioral deferred imitation tasks...
2017: International Journal of Bilingualism: Cross-disciplinary, Cross-linguistic Studies of Language Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29150311/functional-connectivity-of-the-vigilant-attention-network-in-children-and-adolescents-with-attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder
#5
Florian D Zepf, Sarah Bubenzer-Busch, Kevin C Runions, Pradeep Rao, Janice W Y Wong, Simone Mahfouda, Hugo A E Morandini, Richard M Stewart, Julia K Moore, Caroline S Biskup, Simon B Eickhoff, Gereon R Fink, Robert Langner
The ability to maintain attention to simple tasks (i.e., vigilant attention, VA) is often impaired in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms at the brain network level are not clear yet. We therefore investigated ADHD-related differences in resting-state functional connectivity within a meta-analytically defined brain network of 14 distinct regions subserving VA (comprising 91 connections in total), as well as the association of connectivity with markers of behavioural dysfunction in 17 children (age range: 9-14 years) with a diagnosis of ADHD and 21 age-matched neurotypical controls...
November 14, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149632/brain-structural-differences-between-73-and-92-year-olds-matched-for-childhood-intelligence-social-background-and-intracranial-volume
#6
Stuart J Ritchie, David Alexander Dickie, Simon R Cox, Maria Del C Valdés Hernández, Ruth Sibbett, Alison Pattie, Devasuda Anblagan, Paul Redmond, Natalie A Royle, Janie Corley, Susana Muñoz Maniega, Adele M Taylor, Sherif Karama, Tom Booth, Alan J Gow, John M Starr, Mark E Bastin, Joanna M Wardlaw, Ian J Deary
Fully characterizing age differences in the brain is a key task for combating aging-related cognitive decline. Using propensity score matching on 2 independent, narrow-age cohorts, we used data on childhood cognitive ability, socioeconomic background, and intracranial volume to match participants at mean age of 92 years (n = 42) to very similar participants at mean age of 73 years (n = 126). Examining a variety of global and regional structural neuroimaging variables, there were large differences in gray and white matter volumes, cortical surface area, cortical thickness, and white matter hyperintensity volume and spatial extent...
October 16, 2017: Neurobiology of Aging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29148566/factors-that-influence-the-provision-of-intrapartum-and-postnatal-care-by-skilled-birth-attendants-in-low-and-middle-income-countries-a-qualitative-evidence-synthesis
#7
REVIEW
Susan Munabi-Babigumira, Claire Glenton, Simon Lewin, Atle Fretheim, Harriet Nabudere
BACKGROUND: In many low- and middle-income countries women are encouraged to give birth in clinics and hospitals so that they can receive care from skilled birth attendants. A skilled birth attendant (SBA) is a health worker such as a midwife, doctor, or nurse who is trained to manage normal pregnancy and childbirth. (S)he is also trained to identify, manage, and refer any health problems that arise for mother and baby. The skills, attitudes and behaviour of SBAs, and the extent to which they work in an enabling working environment, impact on the quality of care provided...
November 17, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29142279/modifying-response-times-in-the-simon-task-with-transcranial-random-noise-stimulation
#8
James Robert McIntosh, Carsten Mehring
Perceptual decisions pervade our every-day lives, and can align or conflict with inbuilt biases. We investigated these conflicting biases by applying transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) while subjects took part in a visual Simon task - a paradigm where irrelevant spatial cues influence the response times of subjects to relevant colour cues. We found that tRNS reduces the response time of subjects independent of the congruence between spatial and colour cues, but dependent on the baseline response time, both between subjects and across conditions within subjects...
November 15, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29132600/an-overview-of-peer-tutor-training-strategies-at-german-medical-schools
#9
Simone Alvarez, Kathrin Dethleffsen, Tobias Esper, Astrid Horneffer, Kirsten Reschke, Jobst-Hendrik Schultz
BACKGROUND: An increased popularity of peer-assisted learning in medical schools all over the globe has caused a growing interest in taking a closer look into how student tutors are trained to handle the task. This article provides an overview of the tutor training strategies at five medical faculties in Germany. METHODS: Nine German medical faculties with an evident tutor training strategy were contacted by phone or e-mail. Ultimately, five of the nine contacted faculties responded and provided a detailed overview of their individual tutor training...
October 2017: Zeitschrift Für Evidenz, Fortbildung und Qualität Im Gesundheitswesen
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29131760/deep-learning-a-primer-for-radiologists
#10
Gabriel Chartrand, Phillip M Cheng, Eugene Vorontsov, Michal Drozdzal, Simon Turcotte, Christopher J Pal, Samuel Kadoury, An Tang
Deep learning is a class of machine learning methods that are gaining success and attracting interest in many domains, including computer vision, speech recognition, natural language processing, and playing games. Deep learning methods produce a mapping from raw inputs to desired outputs (eg, image classes). Unlike traditional machine learning methods, which require hand-engineered feature extraction from inputs, deep learning methods learn these features directly from data. With the advent of large datasets and increased computing power, these methods can produce models with exceptional performance...
November 2017: Radiographics: a Review Publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29131743/integration-and-temporal-processing-of-asynchronous-audiovisual-speech
#11
David M Simon, Mark T Wallace
Multisensory integration of visual mouth movements with auditory speech is known to offer substantial perceptual benefits, particularly under challenging (i.e., noisy) acoustic conditions. Previous work characterizing this process has found that ERPs to auditory speech are of shorter latency and smaller magnitude in the presence of visual speech. We sought to determine the dependency of these effects on the temporal relationship between the auditory and visual speech streams using EEG. We found that reductions in ERP latency and suppression of ERP amplitude are maximal when the visual signal precedes the auditory signal by a small interval and that increasing amounts of asynchrony reduce these effects in a continuous manner...
November 13, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29129610/the-effect-of-rat-strain-and-stress-exposure-on-performance-in-touchscreen-tasks
#12
Lena-Sophie Martis, Simone Krog, Thao Phuong Tran, Elena Bouzinova, Sofie L Christiansen, Arne Møller, Megan C Holmes, Ove Wiborg
Patients suffering from depression-associated cognitive impairments often recover incompletely after remission from the core symptoms of depression (lack of energy, depressed mood and anhedonia). This study aimed to set the basis for clinically relevant testing of cognitive impairments in a preclinical model of depression. Hence, we used the chronic mild stress (CMS) model of depression, which provokes the core symptom of anhedonia in a fraction of the stress exposed animals, while others remain resilient, and assessed the entire CMS groups' cognitive performance on the touchscreen operant platform...
November 10, 2017: Physiology & Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29124241/us-preventive-services-task-force-prostate-specific-antigen-screening-guidelines-result-in-higher-gleason-score-diagnoses
#13
Glen Gejerman, Patrick Ciccone, Martin Goldstein, Vincent Lanteri, Burton Schlecker, John Sanzone, Michael Esposito, Sergey Rome, Michael Ciccone, Eric Margolis, Robert Simon, Yijun Guo, Sri-Ram Pentakota, Hossein Sadhegi-Nejad
Purpose: To evaluate the impact that the 2012 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening guidelines have had on the diagnosis of prostate cancer, we compared the incidence and distribution of new cases diagnosed in 2011-before the USPSTF PSA screening recommendations versus 2014 at which time the guidelines were widely adopted. Materials and Methods: We identified all prostate biopsies performed by a large urology group practice utilizing a centralized pathology lab...
November 2017: Investigative and Clinical Urology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29123499/gait-and-cognition-in-parkinson-s-disease-cognitive-impairment-is-inadequately-reflected-by-gait-performance-during-dual-task
#14
Heiko Gaßner, Franz Marxreiter, Simon Steib, Zacharias Kohl, Johannes C M Schlachetzki, Werner Adler, Bjoern M Eskofier, Klaus Pfeifer, Jürgen Winkler, Jochen Klucken
Introduction: Cognitive and gait deficits are common symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Motor-cognitive dual tasks (DTs) are used to explore the interplay between gait and cognition. However, it is unclear if DT gait performance is indicative for cognitive impairment. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if cognitive deficits are reflected by DT costs of spatiotemporal gait parameters. Methods: Cognitive function, single task (ST) and DT gait performance were investigated in 67 PD patients...
2017: Frontiers in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29122405/theory-of-mind-impairment-and-its-clinical-correlates-in-patients-with-schizophrenia-major-depressive-disorder-and-bipolar-disorder
#15
Yan-Yu Wang, Yi Wang, Ying-Min Zou, Ke Ni, Xue Tian, Hong-Wei Sun, Simon S Y Lui, Eric F C Cheung, John Suckling, Raymond C K Chan
BACKGROUND: Although Theory of Mind (ToM) impairment has been observed in patients with a wide range of mental disorders, the similarity and uniqueness of these deficits across diagnostic groups has not been thoroughly investigated. METHODS: We recruited 35 participants with schizophrenia (SCZ), 35 with bipolar disorder (BD), 35 with major depressive disorder (MDD), and 35 healthy controls in this study. All participants were matched in age, gender proportion and IQ estimates...
November 6, 2017: Schizophrenia Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29119257/risky-decision-making-and-affective-features-of-impulse-control-disorders-in-parkinson-s-disease
#16
Alice Martini, Simon J Ellis, James A Grange, Stefano Tamburin, Denise Dal Lago, Greta Vianello, Nicola M J Edelstyn
Impulse control disorders (ICDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD) are considered dopaminergic treatment side effects. Cognitive and affective factors may increase the risk of ICD in PD. The aim is to investigate risky decision-making and associated cognitive processes in PD patients with ICDs within a four-stage conceptual framework. Relationship between ICDs and affective factors was explored. Thirteen PD patients with ICD (ICD+), 12 PD patients without ICD (ICD-), and 17 healthy controls were recruited. Overall risky decision-making and negative feedback effect were examined with the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART)...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29118212/delineating-the-diversity-of-spinal-interneurons-in-locomotor-circuits
#17
Simon Gosgnach, Jay B Bikoff, Kimberly J Dougherty, Abdeljabbar El Manira, Guillermo M Lanuza, Ying Zhang
Locomotion is common to all animals and is essential for survival. Neural circuits located in the spinal cord have been shown to be necessary and sufficient for the generation and control of the basic locomotor rhythm by activating muscles on either side of the body in a specific sequence. Activity in these neural circuits determines the speed, gait pattern, and direction of movement, so the specific locomotor pattern generated relies on the diversity of the neurons within spinal locomotor circuits. Here, we review findings demonstrating that developmental genetics can be used to identify populations of neurons that comprise these circuits and focus on recent work indicating that many of these populations can be further subdivided into distinct subtypes, with each likely to play complementary functions during locomotion...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29115023/secondary-queens-in-the-parthenogenetic-termite-cavitermes-tuberosus-develop-through-a-transitional-helper-stage
#18
Simon Hellemans, Denis Fournier, Robert Hanus, Yves Roisin
In termite species with asexual queen succession (AQS), parthenogenetically produced immatures mostly differentiate into secondary queens, called "neotenics." In order to elucidate the ontogenetic origin of neotenics in Cavitermes tuberosus (Termitidae: Termitinae), a neotropical termite with AQS, we investigated developmental pathways of offspring according to their sex and genetic origin using both morphometric and genetic tools. The caste system of C. tuberosus follows the classical pathway of Termitidae...
November 2017: Evolution & Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29114852/a-longitudinal-functional-magnetic-resonance-imaging-study-of-task-control-circuits-and-bulimic-symptoms-over-adolescence
#19
Marilyn Cyr, Martine Fontaine, Mihaela Stefan, Kate Terranova, Daniel C Kopala-Sibley, Evelyn Attia, Rachel Marsh
BACKGROUND: Previous cross-sectional findings from adolescents and adults with Bulimia Nervosa (BN) suggest disturbances in fronto-striatal and cingulo-opercular task control circuits that support self-regulatory processes, including the resolution of cognitive conflict. Herein, we used longitudinal data to examine the developmental trajectories of such disturbances and how the functioning of these circuits relates to changes in BN symptoms over adolescence. METHODS: Thirty-two adolescent females with BN symptoms and 28 healthy control (HC) adolescents participated in the study...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29107547/camkii%C3%AE-expression-defines-two-functionally-distinct-populations-of-granule-cells-involved-in-different-types-of-odor-behavior
#20
Sarah Malvaut, Simona Gribaudo, Delphine Hardy, Linda Suzanne David, Laura Daroles, Simon Labrecque, Marie-Anne Lebel-Cormier, Zayna Chaker, Daniel Coté, Paul De Koninck, Martin Holzenberger, Alain Trembleau, Isabelle Caille, Armen Saghatelyan
Granule cells (GCs) in the olfactory bulb (OB) play an important role in odor information processing. Although they have been classified into various neurochemical subtypes, the functional roles of these subtypes remain unknown. We used in vivo two-photon Ca(2+) imaging combined with cell-type-specific identification of GCs in the mouse OB to examine whether functionally distinct GC subtypes exist in the bulbar network. We showed that half of GCs express Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα(+)) and that these neurons are preferentially activated by olfactory stimulation...
November 6, 2017: Current Biology: CB
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